Raw HD Gallery of the Prehistoric ‘Jurassic World Dominion’ Prologue

The ‘Jurassic World Dominion’ Prologue dropped this morning on YouTube, and while it certainly was beautiful, there is no denying YouTubes compression crushed the details. Thankfully, we have the raw ProRes HD file, and have created a gallery for your viewing pleasure.

Enjoy!

The Prologue to Jurassic World Dominion Is Here – Watch Now!

Hold on to your butts – the first footage from Jurassic World Dominion has hit the internet!

This original 5 min prologue to Jurassic World Dominion, directed by Colin Trevorrow, rockets audiences back 65 million years into the past to experience the world before humans existed—and offers a glimpse of a world in which dinosaurs are living among us.

The story will continue in theaters this Summer.

Stay tuned for our gallery of pro-res HD screenshots, and our breakdown of the footage coming soon!

Jurassic World Dominion Prologue to Air on NBC Tuesday November 23rd

After many – too many – months of waiting, the ‘Jurassic World Dominion‘ prologue that premiered in front of IMAX screenings of Fast 9 will make its way to home audiences. This upcoming Tuesday November 23rd the preview of next summers Jurassic Park sequel will debut on NBC at roughly 8:56pm EST, after ‘The Voice‘.

“A preview of the Jurassic World saga revealing the origins of the dino DNA that started it all.”

For those unfamiliar, the prologue opens during the cretaceous period showing dinosaurs before extinction, later cutting to show some brief glimpses into Dominions present day action 65 million years later. While the prologue is not entirely new, this will be the first time it’s been officially been made available outside of IMAX which is something fans have been asking for globally.

This of course may come as a small disappointment to fans who’ve already seen the very preview months ago and would like to finally see Alan Grant, Ellie Sattler, Claire Dearing, Owen Grady and Ian Malcolm in a proper trailer – however it seems than will not come until February of 2022.

If you want to learn more about the upcoming prologue, be sure to check out our breakdown from over the Summer and stay tuned for more coverage once it releases!

Note: this article has been updated to reflect the final official airtime should be 8:56 PM, and not 9 PM as previously reported.

Jurassic World Evolution 2 Review

The Park is Open – again

It’s been over 3 years since the original Jurassic World Evolution released on consoles and PC, and the anticipated sequel delivers on the promise of Fallen Kingdom: we’re not on an island anymore (except when we are, but more on that later).

Jurassic World Evolution 2 offers some new updates to the established gameplay from the first title, but will also be immediately familiar to players of the first – perhaps too familiar at times. However, for those unfamiliar with Evolution, it is a park building and management game where you’re tasked with creating your very own Jurassic worlds.

The core gameplay loop in Jurassic World Evolution 2 is all about building park attractions with key operation and exhibition facilities, seeing to guest and animal comfort, all while making sure you remain profitable and don’t run out of money. As you may expect, things don’t always go to plan, and chaos will come into play – from natural disasters like tornadoes and blizzards, dinosaurs growing distressed by their health and needs, and occasionally, dinosaurs breaking free and eating your guests (which is a very quick way to run out of funds).

You can help avoid unhappy dinosaurs trying to escape by making sure you’ve crafted an enclosure meeting their environmental needs, such as making sure you’ve grown the correct prehistoric flora for herbivores to feed upon, have enough water, open space, and other factors such as making sure species cohabitating a particular enclosure actually like one another.

If your dinosaurs break free you’ll need to send in ranger teams to round up the ramping threats before they cause too much mayhem, so it’s important to have them placed close by. While this may be easy in the early stages of your park, it becomes more of a challenge as your park grows and is something that will greatly affect your ability to mitigate the collapse of your park – especially as some maps are quite restrictive in size (but fret not, others are quite large).

Likewise, you’ll want to make sure you’ve researched the best facilities to contain and care for your dinos – such as the new medical center for taking care of sick and injured dinosaurs. As sick dinosaurs can die or spread illness, you’ll want to make sure your mobile veterinary teams can access the species as quickly as possible.

Research is integral to keeping your park well managed and profitable, and will also provide you the means to train your scientists whomst are integral to the core game mechanics. Scientists are hired staff required to be assigned to all management tasks such as aforementioned research, expeditions for fossils and dinosaurs, DNA synthesis, and egg incubation. 

Each scientist has three skill categories with associated levels: logistics, genetics, and welfare. The various management tasks, such as sending out a team to look for fossils, have required skills in the category or categories, therefore making sure your various staff are properly leveraged for the tasks ahead is crucial. Likewise, each scientist has a specific perk. Some simply have a higher stamina rate, meaning you can assign them more tasks in a row without them needing a break from overworking, while others may allow for things such as 50% cheaper DNA synthesis or 30% faster egg incubation. You’ll have to make hard choices to make sure you’re saving as much money and time as possible while having enough skill points for the tasks your park requires, and this staff system brings a lot of strategy into the game.

As I mentioned before, the staff can get overworked and require rest. If you’re not careful, the scientists may become disgruntled, causing setbacks in your park such as sabotage. These new functionalities make the gameplay more dynamic as you expand your park, requiring more strategy in your choices as opposed to only arbitrary wait times while tasks complete.

The way you edit the environment is far more dynamic than the first game. For example, herbivores no longer have feeders and rather require the proper plant life to support their diets. While some may feed off of ground fiber and nuts, others will feed off tall leaves. With limited space in each paddock for what you can grow, you need to be mindful about the species you place together so their dietary and general comfort needs (which include things like open space, the amount of rocks, and more) can sync up.

Then, of course, there are the park guests – the people you want to keep happy to fund your dino-park escapades. Their comfort in the park boils down to amenities such as food, shopping, and restrooms, the placement of emergency bunkers, transportation, and of course attractions. Your star attractions are the dinosaurs, and you want to make sure you have the other desired amenities in close proximity to them. Viewing galleries are a primary way for guests to see dinosaurs, and the placement of the galleries is key to make sure the guests actually have sight-lines on the various species. Guests also don’t like to travel too much by foot, so researching and placing structures such as hotels and monorail stations around your focal dino-hubs really helps maximize the success of your park.

Each level features different environmental locations with different sizes and shapes, sometimes including narrow choke points where building and movement will be restricted. Making smart use of that space to fit all the needed structures, pathways, and dinosaur paddocks is crucial. If you’re not careful, you can easily build yourself into a corner where the needed facilities cannot fit. This will affect profit, guest comfort, and your ability to properly care for the dinosaurs – this can become even worse if disaster strikes.

Another great feature is the ability to pause time and assess a situation while assigning tasks within the park or choosing building placements. When a park is large, a lot can happen at once, and this feature allows you to manage many occurrences simultaneously before resuming the action and letting your choices play out. Likewise, you can speed up time by 2 and 3 times, allowing for tasks to complete in a blink of an eye. Be careful though – if things start going wrong, every second counts.

While many of these elements existed in the first Jurassic World Evolution, there are many small quality of life adjustments across the board which make the gameplay more dynamic, and in theory, more fun.

Unlike the first game, Evolution 2 offers 4 different modes of play: Campaign, Chaos Theory, Challenge Mode, and Sandbox.

Campaign mode picks up after the events of Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom, with dinosaurs now free in the mainland across various wilds in the US and elsewhere. The story picks up with Owen Grady and Claire Dearing now employed by the United States Department of Fish and Wildlife (DFW) working to help humans and dinosaurs successfully co-exist. The United States Government is concerned by the potential threat dinosaurs pose, and have set up many departments to help keep a close eye on the dinos. These include the DFW and another key player: the newly formed Dangerous Species Division (DSD) of the CIA. While the DFW and DSD cooperate together, there is some tension and distrust between the government agencies, particularly as the CIA isn’t the most forthcoming about their activities with dinosaurs outside of those the DFW directly assist with.

The single player mode marks the largest departure from Jurassic World Evolution and frankly even Evolution 2’s core gameplay mechanics. Rather than building parks, worrying about guest comfort, and profits, you’re simply tasked with tracking down nuisance dinosaurs and containing, observing, and relocating them – just as normal, non-prehistoric nuisance animals are often dealt with.

As such, the levels are divided into distinct playspaces within each map: the “buildable area” for creating and maintaining the DFW’s facilities and the “wild area”. The wild area consists of large expanses of wilderness where you cannot build but can take direct control of ranger teams to drive and fly across, tracking down dinosaurs, capturing them, and bringing them back to your containment facility that you build. Primarily you will build simple operation facilities such as paleo veterinary centers, paddocks, and observation platforms for the DFW to study the dinosaurs. Essentially, you want to make sure you have the right size paddock with the right terrain inside for the dinosaurs’ comfort, and once you’ve done that, you’ve got nothing else to worry about.

As such, you wont utilize most of the game’s core gameplay features and building options in the single player which, quite frankly, is a bizarre choice in a park building and management game. In fact, the the entire single player feels like a short, snappy narrative driven tutorial for a larger game that Frontier forgot to include. The story ends abruptly, only running a few hours, with a narrative that feels like it’s just setting up the first act. While the campaign of the first Jurassic World Evolution admittedly could drag, it was much larger and felt more content complete. The sequel’s main story can be beat faster than it takes to achieve a 5-star rating on some of the challenge mode locations.

It truly feels like rather than adjust the story to account for the fact that Jurassic World Dominion was delayed, they kept the initial set up and cut the rest of campaign that would intersect too closely with the upcoming film. The story makes mention of a third party and unknown location (seemingly alluding to BioSyn), and it seems like things are just getting ready to explore that thread when the credits role unceremoniously.

If you’re a player more interested in the narrative single player campaign be warned: campaign feels more like a small expansion to the first game rather than a standalone sequel experience. While the new environments are gorgeous, you won’t spend much time in them within the context of campaign. Some levels, such as Pennsylvania’s beautiful Appalachians, aren’t even featured in the various sandbox and challenge modes.

Chaos Theory mode feels like a secondary campaign, only smaller in story scope. It does offer some expanded narrative “what if” situations which are introduced with absolutely stunning intro cut-scenes narrated by Jeff Goldblum, reprising his role of Ian Malcolm (though he sometimes sounds less like Malcolm and goes into his weird and whimsical Goldblum voice). Each level is its own standalone story with simple premises attributed to the five films: build and open Jurassic Park successfully for the first film, Build and open Jurassic Park San Diego successfully for The Lost World, Create Jurassic World and successfully remain open with the Indominus Rex for the fourth movie. However, all of those quickly become repetitive gameplay with less narrative threads as your task is simply to achieve a 5-star rating with certain arbitrary chore-like challenges thrown at you along the way. This mode is hit and miss, particularly as it limits player freedom and can quickly become a little too chaotic if you make one wrong move. Personally, I found the San Diego level to be more engaging than the other two which just felt like they dragged on too long. I’m pretty sure I spent more time on Jurassic World’s Chaos Theory level than I did the main campaign – most of my star dinosaurs dying of old age before I cleared the level.

The issue in Chaos Theory mode is that it mostly assumes you understand the intricacies of park building and management. While it does introduce you to some basics, they’re not enough to realize the long road you have ahead to reach 5-stars. The mode may have felt like less of a chore had the main campaign done more introductory legwork work to introduce the player to the expanded core park management mechanics, but as it stands, the average player may find the experience overwhelming. Spending hours on a simple ‘what if’ scenario shouldn’t be a trial by fire to learn the games core mechanics – because if you make too many mistakes, you may be forced to start from scratch.

Jurassic Park 3 and Fallen Kingdom’s Chaos Theory modes shake up the formula, and while the other three levels may last too long, these two feel too short. Fallen Kingdom’s plot essentially boils down to returning to Nublar sans a volcanic threat, scanning a few dinosaurs, and then using the removal tool to destroy the pre-built park. It’s weird – and not fun.

Jurassic Park 3 stands out, as it seems to be an actual lore expansion set between the events of Jurassic Park 3 and Jurassic World rather than a “what if”, returning to Isla Sorna to capture dinosaurs and relocate them to Isla Nublar for Jurassic World. This level plays more like the single player where you capture wild dinosaurs and create basic paddocks for their comfort only. As such, it is short, but it is also a fun break with some curious lore implications.

Challenge mode is where the game really shines and seems to find better balance between pacing, mission structure, and player expression. It features entire suite of gameplay mechanics all with the goal of reaching a 5-star rating in various locations, while contending different challenge modifiers (for example, a level where dinosaurs are more prone to sickness). While this may sound similar to the Chaos Theory mode, you have more freedom and less arbitrary requirements, allowing you to build and respond to the various challenges in the way you personally wish. Likewise, this mode offers the full suite of ways to obtain dinosaurs for your park, including finding them within the map, sending expeditions to find fossils, and occasionally expeditions to capture wild dinosaurs transporting them directly to your park. It’s a shame the game’s more narrative-driven campaigns don’t embrace this wider sandbox of gameplay, as it offers a sense of freedom and diversity critically lacking in the campaign and Chaos Theory.

That said, much like the first Jurassic World Evolution, the game still lacks a sense of personal freedom to entirely craft a park as you wish with the many facilities and attractions you would come to expect from the films. While the Gyrosphere tour returns, as does a Jurassic Park and World themed vehicle tour, no new rides or dinosaur themed attractions are present – such as the river tour, Pachy arena, or T. rex kingdom. While some of these additions may seem arbitrary, the idea of this game very much revolves around building your own park – and when each park has the same limited suite of options, it quickly becomes repetitive.

This is an issue the first game suffered from, and by result, it often times felt boring when compared to other park management titles. While this game has some new additions, and thus can be more engaging, many of the changes feel more like lateral moves. This is especially because most of the buildings, features, and dinosaurs are straight out of the first game. In fact, some species featured in the first didn’t even make the cut for the sequel.

A fun albeit small addition is the ability to customize some buildings, choosing from a few presets like Jurassic Park or Jurassic World styled walls, entrances, and decorative displays – while also being allowed to customize portions of the colors and lights. While this doesn’t effect gameplay, it does give the player more forms of expression. Although most of it is hard to notice while properly playing the game in its birds eye view.

Some of the buildings you would expect to have alternative models and skins from various eras – such as the aviary or paddock fencing – sadly do not. And while you can choose skins for your vehicles, including the pre-order and deluxe addition bonuses, in sandbox mode you cannot freely choose any skin. If you want Jurassic World-themed ranger teams, you have to choose that building style for the ranger station, and vice versa for Jurassic Park, only allowing for the bonus skins to be freely swapped in. Curiously, the DFW vehicles from campaign seem to be absent.

The ability to genetically modify your dinosaur returns allows you to adjust things like their temperament, lifespan, and of course, how they look. Each species has a variety of skins – imagine them as basic color presets and patterns. You can apply a pattern to a skin to bring out more complexity, usually resulting more contrasting colors and striping. Sadly, like the first game, you cannot actually preview the skins to know what they create and there is no proper database for all the varieties of species designs in-game.

Some of the legacy dinosaur designs also appear as skins, and they also can result in model changes. These include the Tyrannosaurs with skins from all 3 Jurassic Park films, Parasaurolophus from the two sequels, Velociraptors from all three films, the Brachiosaurs from both Jurassic Park and JP3, Stegosaurs, Triceratops, and more. Some legacy species don’t have skin that directly calls out the film its from – such as Spinosaurus, Dilophosaurus or Pachycephalosaurs – yet they do have film accurate colors achievable by choosing the correct generic skin/pattern combos. Just good luck figuring that out on your first try.

While some dinosaurs are incredibly accurate and offer a fantastic look at their film counterparts, others are lacking or have issues. For instance, Jurassic Park 3 female raptors have great colors, yet sport the quills of the males. The Allosaurus retains its look from the first game, which predates Battle at Big Rock and does not reflect Fallen Kingdom either. This means it’s an entirely canon on-screen species with entirely fictional in-game design. The Pteranodons do not have their Lost World or JP3 skin/models, and sadly the Mamenchisaurus does not reflect its design from the The Lost World which was recently shown in better detail for the first time.

The aviaries are engaging and the flying reptiles can escape from them wreaking havoc on your park – however they don’t offer much in the terms of customization, theming, or shape. The species list is on the small side, but does include the Jurassic World Pteranodons and Dimorphodons. Sadly the Dimorphodons lack the fuzzy filaments called pycnofibres that they sport in the films.

The ability to build lagoons and breed marine reptiles also makes its debut, but these facilities have even fewer customizations and gameplay options.

Despite the various frustrating inaccuracies, when the game looks good, it looks fantastic. However, it’s not always firing on all cylinders in the art department or engine performance. While some levels look gorgeous, with the environments looking rich, realistic, and detailed, others have a decidedly dated and lower detailed look which effects visual readability. The same could be said for the dinosaurs. While some species are so detailed you can see each scale and bump in crisp detail up close, others look waxy with muddier textures. That said, as the game is often played at distance from the dinosaurs, the animation, lighting and environments are what really make or breaks the visual experience.

The game suffers from some noticeable draw distance pop-in, especially with shadows which just blip in and out of existence – which can be very distracting. Likewise, lighting effects turn off and on at various distances, and while that may not be obvious when hovering in one location, as you pan across your park it jumps out more and more. This is very obvious while in “capture mode” which turns off the hud and gives you more cinematic control over the camera.

I played the game on the Xbox Series X, one of the most powerful home consoles out there, and these issues were immediately obvious. While I didn’t play the game on the less powerful Xbox One or PS4, I imagine they’re even more notable. Which brings me to the other, more important point: performance.

When things really get going this game struggles, with huge frame hitches as you zoom in and out or pan over particularly complex areas. Again, I can only guess how it runs on the less powerful machines, but it feels like a certain layer of optimization and polish is missing – further illustrated by the numerous crashes I experienced while playing. Thankfully, autosave meant not much progress was lost, although I do recommend saving frequently.

The game also suffers from frequent bugs, and while most are minor and don’t impact the game some can lead to frustrating results. Sometimes dinosaurs can become stuck in place – they attempt to move, making flying or walking motions, but they go nowhere. This leads to them slowly dying from starvation and dehydration. At the very least, that can sometimes be fixed by tranquilizing the dinosaur and relocating them. However, it’s not always that easy in an aviary as you can’t exact direct control over the task. You have to let the AI do it by deploying a drone into the aviary, and guess what: the drone can become stuck. There is no easy fix for that – I found myself destroying aviary hatcheries and rebuilding them simply to allow for a new drone that hopefully doesn’t get stuck. Unfortunately this issue popped up frequently, enough to deter me from flying reptiles in the more difficult challenge modes if possible.

With so few changes from the first game, a shockingly short and simple campaign mode, and the various performance issues I can’t help but feel this game was rushed and surely could have benefited from a delay to release alongside Jurassic World Dominion – if not further out. I also have no doubt content was removed from the game due to the films delay – I suspect it will be released next June alongside the upcoming sequel – but this sadly contributes to what feels like an incomplete package.

Don’t get me wrong, the game can be fun, but much like the first it has the foundations of a decent park management simulation without the much needed finer level of control, freedom, and variety. The gameplay can be repetitive and oftentimes doesn’t feel rewarding. While the dinosaurs do have more behaviors this time, such as pack hunting, they’re essentially just pretty looking props to challenge you that you can’t really appreciate outside of sandbox mode – where you can turn off disasters, have unlimited cash, and can get up close taking your time without concern of park collapse. Even there, there’s not much to do with the dinos if you’re not interested in building environments and then using capture mode to grab cinematic footage of them. I just can’t help but feel there is some core gameplay element lacking here that would make it all more worth it.

While this game isn’t bad – it’s also not great. I suspect it will find its real home with modders and content creators, but the average player likely won’t entirely get what they’re looking for. Likewise, park management fans may find the gameplay more shallow than they’re used to. This was easier to forgive with the first Jurassic World Evolution, but it’s doubly frustrating with the sequel, which seems more interested in re-skinning the first game than offering a proper evolution and improvement. While I do believe Jurassic-fans will find something they enjoy in this game, if you don’t mind waiting a little, I recommend waiting for it to go on sale. 

I can’t imagine it will take too long.

Exclusive Jurassic World CAPTIVZ Clash Edition Mega Egg Available for Pre-order Now!

Get ready to expand your collections with the all-new CAPTIVZ Clash Edition, first available exclusively here at Jurassic Outpost! We’ve partnered with Toy Monster International to offer 250 Mega Surprise Eggs for pre-sale directly through our store, which is the only place to acquire these collectible Jurassic World minfigs in the US for some months.

CAPTIVZ are ‘pop-n-lock’ dinosaur minifigures packaged within ‘Surprise Egg’ capsules (which retail at $5 MSRP) that include battle tokens and slime. They launched with a Fallen Kingdom lineup, and over the summer had a range dedicated to Camp Cretaceous. Each figure is roughly 3-inches long in size, and offer unparalleled accuracy, detail, and paint at their size and price.

The Mega Egg (MSRP $20) is larger deluxe item, including multiple standard egg capsules inside – and much more! Check out our unboxing of one of the Mega Surprise Eggs below!

MELBOURNE, Australia, Sept. 23, 2021 /PRNewswire/ — ToyMonster, the Australia-based toy manufacturer bringing the hottest collectibles to Jurassic World fans across the globe, announces the U.S. launch of the Jurassic World CAPTIVZ Clash Edition. The new line of Jurassic World dinosaur Pop N’ Lock collectible toys will hit shelves in November, just in time for dinosaur-loving holiday wishes to come true.

“We’ve been blown away by the massive fan response to our CAPTIVZ line,” said Claire Carroll, Global Head of Brand & Marketing at ToyMonster. “Now, we’re excited to roll-out the new Clash Edition for the holiday season. Jurassic World fans will go crazy for the epic detail and the most sought-after dinosaur figures!” 

Following the wildly successful launch of CAPTIVZ Jurassic World: Camp Cretaceous over the summer, the CAPTIVZ Clash Edition range gives Jurassic World fans more of what they love. Each Jurassic World CAPTIVZ: Clash Edition Slime Egg includes one Pop N’ Lock dinosaur, slime, battle token and collector battle guide.

The new line features: 

– 30 all-time favorite species from across the Jurassic World franchise (double the quantity from the first season), chosen specifically based on fan feedback 

– New paint detail features battle wounds from epic Clash movie moments 

– Six rare dinosaurs with metallic finishes 

– Stretchy lava-like, red slime 

– Expanded battle play options

To battle, just unwrap, crack and ooze through lava-like slime to reveal the mystery Jurassic World dinosaur Pop N’ Lock figure, identify the species and then challenge friends to battle rounds based on aggression or intelligence powers, height or weight stats – the bigger your dinosaur army, the better chances of defeating your opponent – then tally up battle points to become the ultimate CAPTIVZ champion!

To kick-off the CAPTIVZ Clash Edition launch, ToyMonster has formed an exclusive partnership with Jurassic Outpost, a leading Jurassic World fan site founded and led by Jack De La Mare and Chris Pugh. With a nod to the dedicated Jurassic World fans, ToyMonster and Jurassic Outpost will host exclusive promotions including: 

Mega Egg Presale – On October 8th, Jurassic Outpost will launch the presale of the Jurassic World CAPTIVZ: Mega Egg, giving fans early access before it becomes widely available. Packed with mega surprises, the Mega Egg is nearly one foot tall and includes three Pop N’ Lock dinosaurs, two eggs, two stretchy lava slimes, one Jurassic World pull back car, three battle tokens, game playmat and die, backpack clip, 10 stickers and collector guide. Priced at $20, the Mega Egg presale will be available in limited quantity, while supplies last. 

Fans First Dino Stampede – Stomping into the holiday spirit, ToyMonster is gifting Jurassic World fans with FREE Jurassic World CAPTIVZ: Clash Edition Slime Eggs (U.S. residents only; while supplies last). For fans that just can’t wait for the retail launch in late-November, Jurassic Outpost will host the Fans First Dino Stampede, offering one (1) free Clash Edition Slime Egg per household, to the first 250 fans that register at Jurassic Outpost starting November 1st at 9am PST.  

“The detail and accuracy of the CAPTIVZ dinosaurs are unrivaled at their scale and price, and ToyMonster’s continued engagement with fans has led to many exciting additions and updates as each new wave hits shelves,” said Chris Pugh, Jurassic Outpost. “We’ve been a fan of the Jurassic World CAPTIVZ lineup since launch, and are incredibly excited to team up with ToyMonster to help even more fans discover these collectibles!”

Available at Walmart, 5 Below and Meijer, starting in late-November, the line is priced starting at MSRP $4.99 for a single egg. The full CAPTIVZ line will evolve over coming seasons to include never before seen dinosaur species and new innovation in the line, leading up to the highly anticipated theatrical release of Jurassic World: Dominion in June 2022.

About ToyMonster

ToyMonster is a Global toy manufacturer, headquartered in Melbourne Australia – where you’ll find a team of Monsters dedicated to producing innovative concepts designed to spark kids’ imaginations through play, put smiles on faces & ultimately disrupt the toy aisle with new ideas. ToyMonster was successful in securing a Global license in 2019 with NBC Universal to manufacture and distribute Jurassic World products; the start of a pipeline of new development yet to come. For more information, please visit https://toymonster.net/

About Jurassic World

From Universal Pictures and Amblin Entertainment, Jurassic World immerses audiences of all ages in a new era of wonder and thrills where dinosaurs and humankind must learn to coexist. Jurassic World is more than a film franchise. At every turn, this $5 billion film series delivers a larger-than-life destination for exploration, discovery, and epic adventure. Dinosaurs live again and they live in Jurassic WorldJurassic World: Dominion debuts in theaters June 2022.

About Jurassic Outpost

Initially founded in 2007 by Jack De La Mare as a fan newsfeed titled JurassicParkIV.org, the site has continued to evolve into a unique platform over the years, becoming what is now Jurassic Outpost. Now hosting millions of unique viewers, Jack, Chris, and the ‘Outpost’ team celebrate everything Jurassic on their website, social channels, and ‘InGeneral Podcast’ while also creating their own original content – often in collaboration with Universal Pictures, including the ‘Beyond the Gates’ web-series for Target.com and Jurassic World’s YouTube channel. Visit the Outpost at: https://www.jurassicoutpost.com 

PRE-ORDER NOW

The Jurassic World CAPTIVZ Collection Expands With All-New CLASH Edition!

Today at TTPM Toy Monster International has unveiled the all-new Jurassic World ‘Clash Edition’ of their CAPTIVZ surprise-egg mini-figures. The Clash lineup includes over 30 dinosaurs from the Jurassic Park trilogy, Jurassic World films, and Camp Cretaceous across two waves and multiple skus, due to hit store shelves this November.

CAPTIVZ are ‘pop-n-lock’ dinosaur minifigures packaged within ‘Surprise Egg’ capsules (which retail at $5 MSRP) that include battle tokens and slime. They launched with a Fallen Kingdom lineup, and over the summer had a range dedicated to Camp Cretaceous. Each figure is roughly 3-inches long in size, and offer unparalleled accuracy, detail, and paint at their size and price.

The Clash Edition lineup will also bring some new items to the range, including the ‘MEGA EGG Surprise’! As the name suggests, the Mega Egg is a fantastic surprise egg collectors gift set which features numerous Jurassic World items inside of it and will retail at $20 USD. We’ve partnered with Toy Monster International to offer 250 Mega Eggs first, exclusively through the Jurassic Outpost store starting October 4th. Stay tuned for more details about this set, & read the full press release below!

MELBOURNE, Australia, Sept. 23, 2021 /PRNewswire/ — ToyMonster, the Australia-based toy manufacturer bringing the hottest collectibles to Jurassic World fans across the globe, announces the U.S. launch of the Jurassic World CAPTIVZ Clash Edition. The new line of Jurassic World dinosaur Pop N’ Lock collectible toys will hit shelves in November, just in time for dinosaur-loving holiday wishes to come true.

“We’ve been blown away by the massive fan response to our CAPTIVZ line,” said Claire Carroll, Global Head of Brand & Marketing at ToyMonster. “Now, we’re excited to roll-out the new Clash Edition for the holiday season. Jurassic World fans will go crazy for the epic detail and the most sought-after dinosaur figures!” 

Following the wildly successful launch of CAPTIVZ Jurassic World: Camp Cretaceous over the summer, the CAPTIVZ Clash Edition range gives Jurassic World fans more of what they love. Each Jurassic World CAPTIVZ: Clash Edition Slime Egg includes one Pop N’ Lock dinosaur, slime, battle token and collector battle guide.

The new line features: 

– 30 all-time favorite species from across the Jurassic World franchise (double the quantity from the first season), chosen specifically based on fan feedback 

– New paint detail features battle wounds from epic Clash movie moments 

– Six rare dinosaurs with metallic finishes 

– Stretchy lava-like, red slime 

– Expanded battle play options

To battle, just unwrap, crack and ooze through lava-like slime to reveal the mystery Jurassic World dinosaur Pop N’ Lock figure, identify the species and then challenge friends to battle rounds based on aggression or intelligence powers, height or weight stats – the bigger your dinosaur army, the better chances of defeating your opponent – then tally up battle points to become the ultimate CAPTIVZ champion!

To kick-off the CAPTIVZ Clash Edition launch, ToyMonster has formed an exclusive partnership with Jurassic Outpost, a leading Jurassic World fan site founded and led by Jack De La Mare and Chris Pugh. With a nod to the dedicated Jurassic World fans, ToyMonster and Jurassic Outpost will host exclusive promotions including: 

Mega Egg Presale – On October 4, Jurassic Outpost will launch the presale of the Jurassic World CAPTIVZ: Mega Egg, giving fans early access before it becomes widely available. Packed with mega surprises, the Mega Egg is nearly one foot tall and includes three Pop N’ Lock dinosaurs, two eggs, two stretchy lava slimes, one Jurassic World pull back car, three battle tokens, game playmat and die, backpack clip, 10 stickers and collector guide. Priced at $20, the Mega Egg presale will be available in limited quantity, while supplies last. 

Fans First Dino Stampede – Stomping into the holiday spirit, ToyMonster is gifting Jurassic World fans with FREE Jurassic World CAPTIVZ: Clash Edition Slime Eggs (U.S. residents only; while supplies last). For fans that just can’t wait for the retail launch in late-November, Jurassic Outpost will host the Fans First Dino Stampede, offering one (1) free Clash Edition Slime Egg per household, to the first 250 fans that register at Jurassic Outpost starting November 1st at 9am PST.  

“The detail and accuracy of the CAPTIVZ dinosaurs are unrivaled at their scale and price, and ToyMonster’s continued engagement with fans has led to many exciting additions and updates as each new wave hits shelves,” said Chris Pugh, Jurassic Outpost. “We’ve been a fan of the Jurassic World CAPTIVZ lineup since launch, and are incredibly excited to team up with ToyMonster to help even more fans discover these collectibles!”

Available at Walmart, 5 Below and Meijer, starting in late-November, the line is priced starting at MSRP $4.99 for a single egg. The full CAPTIVZ line will evolve over coming seasons to include never before seen dinosaur species and new innovation in the line, leading up to the highly anticipated theatrical release of Jurassic World: Dominion in June 2022.

About ToyMonster

ToyMonster is a Global toy manufacturer, headquartered in Melbourne Australia – where you’ll find a team of Monsters dedicated to producing innovative concepts designed to spark kids’ imaginations through play, put smiles on faces & ultimately disrupt the toy aisle with new ideas. ToyMonster was successful in securing a Global license in 2019 with NBC Universal to manufacture and distribute Jurassic World products; the start of a pipeline of new development yet to come. For more information, please visit https://toymonster.net/

About Jurassic World

From Universal Pictures and Amblin Entertainment, Jurassic World immerses audiences of all ages in a new era of wonder and thrills where dinosaurs and humankind must learn to coexist. Jurassic World is more than a film franchise. At every turn, this $5 billion film series delivers a larger-than-life destination for exploration, discovery, and epic adventure. Dinosaurs live again and they live in Jurassic WorldJurassic World: Dominion debuts in theaters June 2022.

About Jurassic Outpost

Initially founded in 2007 by Jack De La Mare as a fan newsfeed titled JurassicParkIV.org, the site has continued to evolve into a unique platform over the years, becoming what is now Jurassic Outpost. Now hosting millions of unique viewers, Jack, Chris, and the ‘Outpost’ team celebrate everything Jurassic on their website, social channels, and ‘InGeneral Podcast’ while also creating their own original content – often in collaboration with Universal Pictures, including the ‘Beyond the Gates’ web-series for Target.com and Jurassic World’s YouTube channel. Visit the Outpost at: https://www.jurassicoutpost.com 

What dinosaur are you most excited for from the Clash Edition range? Be sure to let us know, and stay tuned for all the latest Jurassic news!

‘Jurassic World Camp Cretaceous’ Season 4 Coming This December

The third season of Jurassic World: Camp Cretaceous made its debut on Netflix in May of this year, continuing the story of six campers stranded on the ill-fated Isla Nublar. The season opens 6 months after the campers were left behind after the fall of Jurassic World, eventually aligning with Fallen Kingdom’s opening moments. After numerous trials and tribulations for the gregarious gang, the season closed with the kids finally sailing away from Isla Nublar…

But the number one question has been what comes next – and when?

We’ve known a 4th season is coming: Jurassic World Director Colin Trevorrow has said his favorite moments from the show will take place in it — not to mention last we saw of the campers they were unaware of something else lurking in the lower cabins of the yacht they’re now adrift upon. For our speculation on what the season will entail, I strongly suggest checking out the video below where we outline the evidence pointing to the return of Isla Sorna:

As for the release date of Camp Cretaceous Season 4, we’ve been long reporting that it would be a longer wait than normal to better align with the ‘Jurassic World Dominion’ debut. Since early this year we had been hearing Season 4 would release this December, with the fifth season dropping after Dominion in July of 2022 – and newly revealed tie-in books for the fourth season support this.

Season 4 tie-in novels Camp Cretaceous, Volume Four: The Deluxe Junior Novelization and Rescue Mission! (Jurassic World: Camp Cretaceous)have been revealed by the publisher and made available for Pre-Order, each sporting a January 4th release date.

Given the January 4th, 2022 release date for the books, we suspect the season will release December 24th or 17th, 2021. For some added context, every season of Camp Cretaceous has landed on Netflix on a Friday, and each season had multiple tie-in books that would release roughly 4 – 10 days later. If Season 4 adheres to the same schedule, December 24th is the most probable date.

We go into more detail about all of this in our YouTube video, including what the ‘Rescue Mission’ title may mean – so check it out!

When you take past marketing schedules for Camp Cretaceous into consideration, this means the first trailer will most likely hit in October. However, given the longer time between seasons we’re still hopeful to see something this month – perhaps on September 18th, the one year anniversary of the Camp Cretaceous premiere!

Are you looking forward to the fourth season of Camp Cretaceous, and what do you hope to see happen? Let us know in the comments, and stay tuned to Jurassic Outpost for the latest news!

TRANSFORMERS X JURASSIC PARK: ‘TYRANNOCON REX’ vs ‘AUTOBOT JP93’ NOW AVAILABLE TO PRE-ORDER!

Hold on to your butts – months of rumors about a potential Jurassic World and Transformers crossover have come true! Today Hasbro has announced an all new set based upon an iconic moment from the very first Jurassic Park: Tyrannocon Rex vs Autobot JP93!

Hasbro, Inc. (NASDAQ: HAS), Universal Brand Development and Amblin Entertainment today revealed the first-ever TRANSFORMERS X Jurassic Park collaboration. The iconic T.Rex and Ford Explorer from the blockbuster 1993 film, Jurassic Park, are now TRANSFORMERS robots – TYRANNOCON REX and AUTOBOT JP93. The new TRANSFORMERS X Jurassic Park figure and vehicle pack celebrates the groundbreaking, ultimate thrill ride, Jurassic Park, which brought audiences to an island theme park populated by dinosaurs created from prehistoric DNA… and we all know what happened next!

 

Welcome…to Jurassic Park. TYRANNOCON REX is on the loose, and it’s up to AUTOBOT JP93 to track her down and stop her from wreaking havoc. Both figures feature a combined 260 unique decos and details inspired by fan-favorite moments from Jurassic Park. The TYRANNOCON REX figure converts into T.rex mode in 27 steps and features detailed molded dino texture. The figure features an all-new head mold and stands at 7 inches.

 

Fans will also enjoy a nostalgic interpretation of one of the iconic vehicles from the film, as the AUTOBOT JP93 figure converts into licensed Ford Explorer mode in 18 steps. The figure stands at 5.5 inches and comes with a blaster accessory that can attach to the figure in both modes. Dr. Alan Grant and the Game Warden inspired both the JP93 hat in bot mode and the JP93 blaster accessory.

 

Both figures are contained within packaging inspired by the unforgettable scene in Jurassic Park when the T. rex gets loose from her enclosure and crushes the Ford Explorer. The packaging also includes a cardboard backdrop illustration of the T. rex’s cage, so that fans can recreate the iconic scene, in addition to T. rex footprint graphics on the back of the pack.

 

TRANSFORMERS robots have always been… More than Meets the Eye, but now, through the TRANSFORMERS Collaborative, fans can experience these larger-than-life characters as they team up, mash up, and meet up with other characters, teams and people who share this same special quality. It is a world of constant change where things are not what they seem.

 

The TYRANNOCON REX figure and AUTOBOT JP93 vehicle pack are available now at $104.99 for pre-order on Amazon.com. A second release of the figure and vehicle pack will be available starting December 1, 2021, via HasbroPulse.com and select retailers worldwide.

This is a set I personally never expected, but would have killed for as a kid, and I fully expect it to be highly sought after by collectors. The Tyrannosaurus Rex in the set is inspired Megatron’s Tyrannosaurus form from Beast Wars (which the latest live-action Transformers movie ‘Rise of the Beasts’ is based upon), while ‘Autobot JP93’ is an all-new character with a more typical Transformers theme.

Pre-Order now at Amazon.com!

What do you think of this Transformers and Jurassic Park collaboration, and will you be picking up the set? Let us know in the comments below, and stay tuned for more Jurassic news!

‘Jurassic World Dominion’ Opening to Take Place 65 Million Years in the Past & Features Seven New Species (plus Feathers)!

Hot off the heels of learning we’ll get our first look at ‘Jurassic World Dominion’ exclusively during IMAX screenings of ‘Fast and the Furious 9’, we now have details about what the exclusive preview entails!

Opening up 65 million years in the past, we will see the dinosaurs as they originally were, in their natural prehistoric environments. This includes newcomer Moros intrepidus, a small Tyrannosaurid which can be seen sporting full coat of feathery plumage in the below image. As for the larger species, sans feathers? That’s none-other than the much anticpated Giganatosaurus.

The IMAX® exclusive allows fans to see the biggest, boldest chapter in the Jurassic series yet on the biggest screen and in the most thrilling way possible. “As part of our celebration welcoming moviegoers back into theaters this summer, we couldn’t think of a more perfect way to say, ‘thank you’ to the hundreds of millions of Jurassic and Fast fans around the world,” said Jim Orr, President of Domestic Theatrical Distribution for Universal Pictures. “This first look at Jurassic World: Dominion that Colin and his team put together is like nothing you’ve ever seen before. Even better, there’s simply no more perfect place to experience both the Dominion Preview and F9 than on a massive IMAX® screen. This really is the ultimate movie-fan experience.” 

The five-minute Special Extended Preview of Jurassic World: Dominion, which audiences will be able to experience in full-screen 1:90:1 IMAX® aspect ratio,includes a prologue to the film’s narrative and is set 65 million years ago, during the Cretaceous period, when dinosaurs roamed the entire Earth. The breathtaking, action-packed scenes, featuring Oscar® winner Michael Giacchino’s iconic score, reveal what Earth looked like long before humans existed and tell the origin story of how dinosaur DNA first came to be carried by a mythic mosquito. The Preview features seven new species of dinosaurs, created by the legendary Industrial Light & Magic, that have never been seen in any Jurassic film before. But the Preview doesn’t end there and holds some real trademark Jurassic surprises with dinosaurs later roaming an Earth that is decidedly less theirs alone. 

“Ever since I was a kid, I have wanted to see dinosaurs in their natural habitat,” director Colin Trevorrow says. “It may have taken a few decades, but with a little help from ILM, Universal and Amblin, it has finally happened. This Preview is just a glimpse of the film we’ve made. It’s an epic celebration of everything Steven Spielberg and Michael Crichton created, and I can’t wait to share it with the world next summer.”

The Preview will be available at IMAX® screenings of F9 in more than 40 countries and territories including Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, Central America, Chile, Colombia, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Ecuador, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Indonesia, India, Israel, Italy, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Mongolia, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Romania, Serbia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, Thailand, Trinidad, United Kingdom, Ukraine, United States and Vietnam. (In countries where F9 is opening earlier than June 25, the Preview will be available on opening day on IMAX® screens in those markets.)

“This sequence was made to be seen on the biggest screen possible. Luckily, IMAX theaters are back, and all over the world we’re returning to theaters because movies bring us closer together,” Trevorrow says. “I think we need that shared experience right now … maybe more than we ever have.”

This is a big day for Jurassic World, Park, and Paleontology (with a major caveat) fans alike. The appearance of feathered dinosaurs in the Jurassic franchise has been long requested, and it seems Dominion has spared no expense in giving them their much anticipated exciting debut.

As for what else the preview will showcase? We hear there will be lots of exciting T. rex action, modern day (and perhaps prehistoric), which will steal the show. Likewise, Dreadnoughtus, Quetzalcoatlus, Oviraptor, Nasutoceratops, and Iguanodon will showcase in the opening – all being entirely new, other than Nasutoceratops which featured in Battle at Big Rock.

As for the paleontological caveat — it seems Giganatosaurus and Tyrannosaurus rex will cross paths, which is well, quite absurdly fictional. Not only were they from two separate continents, they were separated by more time than when man evolved from primates. In an age of misinformation, that’s frustrating to hear, as this will greatly misinform the public about these animals, and be a huge hinderance for proper paleo-science education.

That rant aside, it is incredibly exciting to hear so many new species will feature, and we cannot wait to see their paleo-accurate depictions. We can’t help but wonder how much the prehistoric Tyrannosaurus Rex design, featured on the poster with small hair-like feathers, will vary from its de-extinct Jurassic Park iteration. Likewise, will Mattel or other merch manufactures bring these designs to life? It certainly would make a great display with them next to one another!

Be sure to check out our breakdown of the footage here:

Tickets for ‘F9’ are on sale now — be sure to pick up your IMAX screening today!

First Look at Mattel’s Scorpios Rex and Eco-Friendly Mosasaurus From Camp Cretaceous!

Spoiler warning: If you’ve not seen Season 3 of Camp Cretaceous, this article goes into detail about numerous story elements. So if you haven’t seen it yet, go watch it. Seriously, it’s the best season yet.

Now that we’ve gotten that out of the way, we have some exciting new reveals from Matel’s Jurassic World toy line that will be hitting stores this Summer! The third Season of Camp Cretaceous made its debut on Friday, following the story of six teenage campers stranded on Isla Nublar after the demise of the park. As they struggle to survive and find a way to escape the dino-infested island, they encounter numerous species of dinosaurs during thrilling sequences.

With the third season of the Jurassic Netflix series, Mattel has brought even more dinosaurs from the show to life. Take a look at the all-new toys, and then learn more about the terrifying hybrid Scorpios Rex from showrunner Scott Kreamer below!

JURASSIC WORLD OCEAN PROTECTOR MOSASAURUS™ 

SRP:  $34.99 | 4Y+ 

  • Be a part of the thrilling action and adventure with Jurassic World Ocean Protector Mosasaurus, the colossal swimming dinosaur which makes a big splash as a fan favorite in the blockbuster Jurassic World franchise. 
  • This Mosasaurus action figure is inspired by the movie and comes in a massive size that will thrill fans at 8.5 inches (21.6 cm) high and 17 inches (43.2 cm) wide. 
  • Realistic sculpting, moveable joints and articulation help this colossal creature come to life, including a wide-opening jaw. 
  • The figure is made from 1 pound (454 g) of ocean-bound plastic; plastic that is sourced within 31 miles (50 km) of waterways in areas lacking formal waste collection systems.

The third season of Camp Cretaceous takes part roughly six-months after the fall of Jurassic World, which means the Mosasaurus is hungrier than ever, and will soon escape into the ocean (as seen during the opening of Fallen Kingdom – which also takes place about 6 months after Jurassic World). This of course leads to some must-see moments with the prehistoric marine reptile, making the aquatic terror a must-have toy for fans of the show and collectors alike.

However, this huge Mosasaur toy is more than just a series tie-in: it’s part of a new eco-friendly initiative Mattel has been launching on multiple fronts. The Mosasaurus toy is created from 1-pound of “Ocean-Bound” plastic, truly living up to its “Ocean Protector” title.

We’re excited to see Mattel finding news ways to reduce their ecological footprint and become more ‘green’, and hope to see more items boast similar programs in the future.

JURASSIC WORLD: CAMP CRETACEOUS SLASH ‘N BATTLE SCORPIOS REX

SRP: $24.99 | 4Y+ 

  • Get ready for more thrills and adventure with Jurassic World: Camp Cretaceous! The all-new hybrid dinosaur revealed in season 3 (which premiered globally on May 21 on Netflix), Scorpios Rex, is extremely fast, dangerous and unpredictable—and unleashes terror with its poisonous quills. 
  • Kids can relive all the action from the popular animated series with this larger-sized Slash ‘N Battle Scorpios Rex action figure featuring a dynamic claw slashing feature, a chomp and roar, plus a mighty tail whip attack. 
  • To start the claw slashing action, push the button for a full-on arm extending slash and grab attack. Push the other button to activate a big chomp and roar, and pull the Scorpios Rex’s tail back to activate the spring-loaded motion for a surprise tail whip attack, too. 

After months of speculation, the mysterious “E750” has been revealed: the Scorpios Rex. This hybrid dinosaur might be the scariest creature to appear in the larger Jurassic-universe, and is truly an abomination in the best possible ways. This was one of Dr. Wu’s earliest attempts at creating a hybrid, before the Indominus Rex and Indoraptor – it was deemed a failure and ordered to be destroyed by Simon Masrani. However, Dr. Wu decided to cryo-freeze the dangerous dino, which unfortunately thawed out in Season 2, pitting it against the campers in Season 3.

To learn more about the ‘S. rex’ we talked to showrunner Scott Kreamer to shed some light on this exciting new addition to Jurassic World lore:

“Predating the Indominus Rex and Indoraptor, the Scorpios Rex (or “E-750 project”) was Dr. Wu’s first foray into creating a hybrid dinosaur. As in many first attempts at creation, mistakes were made. We started hypothesizing in the writers’ room that the Indominus Rex couldn’t have possibly been Wu’s first shot at making a hybrid, which got us to thinking about what came before, and why was it unsuccessful.”

Scott went on to explain how the Scorpios not only filled a role within the backstory of hybrid dinosaurs, but also presented an opportunity to push the story of the campers forward in exciting new ways:

“At this point in the story, the campers have learned to survive amongst the dinosaurs on Isla Nublar. Not to the point of complacency, but still, they know the lay of the land. We wanted to shake things up and have them face something new and overwhelming, something that not even Darius’s dino knowledge, Sammy’s big animal expertise, nor their experiences on the island could possibly prepare them for.”

If you’ve seen the new season, you know how true that is. The Scorpios Rex is a bizarrely terrifying animal which feels unnatural and unpredictable. It’s not only a new challenge for the campers to face, it’s a new experience for the viewers, pushing into territory that the films had not yet ventured.

The Scorpios truly is the franchises first monster, perhaps reminding some fans of the scrapped attempts at dino-human hybrids which Jurassic Park 4 once considered. In fact, in some moments the Scorpios almost feels reminiscent of that now infamous art by Carlos Huante. To dig deeper into the DNA and design philosophy behind the proto-indominus, Scott went on to say the following:

“Since the Scorpios was the first step in creating the Indominus and Indoraptor, we definitely hoped fans would notice the family resemblance of the trio.  Sort of like when you see those drawings detailing the evolution of man, we wanted to be able to visually see the evolution from the chaotic failed medical experiment that is the Scorpios, all the way to the sleek killer that is the Indoraptor. 


We have taken great pains in the series to portray the dinosaurs as animals, not monsters.  In the case of the Scorpios Rex, we wanted a monster.  Aaron Hammersley and I had some initial thoughts, and then our design team took it and ran, playing a lot with proportions: the overly long arms, the thinner than usual torso, the poisonous quills.  In addition, we tasked our animation team with making the Scorpios’s movements feel off, almost zombie-like, as if it wasn’t totally in control of its body and limbs.  Top that off with some top-notch (and horrifying) sound design and amazing effects & lighting, and we had ourselves a monster.


Given that the Scorpios was Dr. Wu’s first shot at creating a hybrid dinosaur, we figured he’d throw the kitchen sink at it, genetically-speaking.  Along with his go-to tree frog DNA and Scorpion fish DNA, the Scorpios also shares genetic make-up with (amongst others) T rex, velociraptor and carnotaurus.”

The Scorpios Rex may not be beautiful, but it is certainly stunning to look at, and is a deadly addition to Jurassic World. As someone who prefers to keep dinosaurs as animals, and the Jurassic films as dinosaur movies, I’m surprised to admit how much I enjoyed the Scorpios in season 3. From the design to its erratic behavior, it just clicked for me – and it felt just grounded enough, especially when juxtaposed against the other dinosaurs which seemed to look and act more like real animals than ever before in the modern-era of the franchise.

I wouldn’t want to see hybrids go any further into monster territory, but I feel the Scorpios found the perfect balance and really created a unique presence on screen. With that in mind, I can’t wait to get my hands on the latest toy from Mattel, which is due to hit shelves soon.

Are you a fan of the Scorpios Rex, and will you pick up its toy counterpart? Let us know in the comments below, and as always, stay tuned to Jurassic Outpost for more!