Jurassic World: The Ride To Re-open April 16th with new update!

Universal Studios Hollywood announced today that the theme park, which closed in March of 2020 due to the Covid-19 pandemic, will officially re-open to the public on Friday April 16th!

With the re-opening of the park that means that Jurassic World: The Ride will also be re-opening. But the ride will look a little bit different than it did the last time guests experienced it. Added to the ride is a new animatronic Indominus Rex!

The grand reopening of Universal Studios Hollywood also brings guests face-to-face with “Jurassic World—The Ride’s” all-new, extraordinarily realistic dinosaur, the Indominus rex, who stakes her claim at the ride’s finale in a forceful battle with her arch-rival, the Tyrannosaurus rex.”

“Breaking new ground with highly complex innovations, this fully-articulated lifelike Indominus injects intense new thrills, excitement and intrigue to the already dynamic ride. Spanning nearly 55 feet horizontally from head to tail and over 22 feet vertically, the Indominus’ imposing presence will be amplified by the fluidity of her motions and synchronized movements that deliver an unprecedented level of authenticity. From the subtle blinking of her eyes, the flexing of her arms and claws and clenching of her jaw as she bears her razor-sharp teeth, the colossal Indominus rex will lunge from her hillside setting, stalking guests just before they descend the giant waterfall drop to escape her grasp.”

Included with the press release of the ride updates is a new advertisement poster showing the Indominus Rex squaring off with the Tyrannosaurus Rex as a ride boat is about to plummet down a waterfall.

What are your thoughts on Universal Studios Hollywood re-opening and the addition of the Indominus Rex to the Jurassic World ride? Please let us know your thoughts in the comments section down below!

New World: A Jurassic World Fan Film – Watch It Today!

Filmmaker Dillon Brown and Horror Nerd Productions are releasing a new fan film set in the Jurassic World franchise, and you can watch it now! New World: A Jurassic World Fan Film centers around the dinosaur and human chaos that could follow the events of Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. The logline is as follows:

“After the events at Lockwood Manor in Northern California, the genetically engineered dinosaurs captured from Isla Nublar are now roaming the world, many of them freely. Adjusting to this new life is difficult, as most places have issued strict guidelines on interacting with the animals, and many communities have even gone on lockdown as a safety precaution. Presented as a series of found-footage smartphone clips, and telling a wraparound story about a rogue videographer who sells dinosaur footage to news outlets, New World: A Jurassic World Fan Film presents a unique look at what our world has become.”

The film features original dinosaur effects as well as cameos and contributions from members of the Jurassic fan community. It was originally slated to release on April 16, 2021 but was finished early and is available now!

A note from director Dillon Brown:

“This entire film was shot using smart phones, and almost all of the effects you see were used by combining free apps on an iPhone. The entire film cost under $40 to make and was done as an experiment in pandemic filmmaking, allowing friends to get together virtually and create a film from a safe distance. Every VFX shot started out on a phone and utilizing free assets online, we were able to create our film. This was an exercise in bringing together the Jurassic Community and is in no way affiliated with the Jurassic World brand beyond a not-for-profit fan film.”

You can watch the film right now at the link below!

You can find more of Dillon and Horror Nerd Productions‘ short films and other work here.

What do you think will happen in the world following the events of Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom? Check out New World: A Jurassic World Fan Film and let us know what you think below!

Take a Look at the Brand New Nedry’s Getaway Pack Featured in ‘Beyond The Gates’ Episode 2!

Last month we were excited to debut an all-new collectors focused web-series Beyond The Gates, revealing brand new Jurassic products! The debut episode featured two items – The Lost World Male Velociraptor, and the Jurassic Park 3 Pteranodon.

This month we’re excited to launch episode two and debut the Jurassic World Legacy Collection Dennis Nedry Escape Pack:

Along with speaking to Mattel toy designer Rafael Bencosme, we got to go hands-on with the bundle and see up close the detail put into Dennis Nedry, the Staff Jeep, and the Dilophosaurus.

Relive the exciting big-screen action with this Jurassic World Legacy Collection Nedry Getaway Pack! Play out the famous scene from the original Jurassic Park film when Dennis Nedry encounters the spitting Dilophosaurus and attempts to flee in his vehicle. Set includes the fan favourite figure of villain Dennis Nedry, the spitting Dilophosaurus and the Jurassic Park vehicle with park logo and rolling wheels.

Take home the excitement of the Jurassic Park film with this collectible Nedry Getaway Pack! Makes a great gift for fans of the Jurassic World franchise, dinosaurs and action play!

We’re thrilled to be able to debut more exciting Jurassic items in Beyond The Gates and the next episode will focus on an exclusive item from the Camp Cretaceous collection. Stay tuned for more!

Never-Before-Seen Early Concept Video Of The “Raptors In The Kitchen” Sequence From ‘Jurassic Park’!

Ever since ‘Jurassic World’ put a spotlight back on the ‘Jurassic Park’ franchise, things from the productions of the original films that were long buried in the depths of files, folders, and boxes have been unearthed. Scripts, storyboards, original artwork, and now a previously unseen concept video presented by Jurassic Time!

One of the scenes from ‘Jurassic Park’ that the production spent a lot of pre-planning was the famous “Raptors In The Kitchen” sequence near the climax of the film. It went through many variations as evidenced in the scripts, storyboards, and animatics. However, this newly-revealed concept video shows yet another variation on the entire sequence with a key difference that sets it apart from anything previously known.

The concept video (which Jurassic Time has enhanced with resources and added music from the ‘Rick Carter’s Jurassic Park’ score to make it more watchable) begins with a series of storyboards that depict Dr. Alan Grant, Tim, and Lex entering the Visitor Center after they have trekked through the park. And unlike every known version of the sequence, Grant leaves them in the restaurant with a park worker who just happens to still be in there. After Grant leaves to find the others, the worker goes into the kitchen to prepare a meal for the hungry kids.

Previously unseen storyboard of a park worker meeting with Grant and the kids in the Visitor Center.

Shortly after, a raptor’s shadow grazes over a mural against a restaurant wall that features its likeness. The kids retreat into the kitchen to hide. As the raptor approaches the door to the kitchen and opens it, the storyboards change into actual video footage of an unfinished raptor suit worn by John Rosengrant from Stan Winston Studios. He walks into a makeshift version of the kitchen set, using a collection of tables, real items, and even some hand-drawn representations. But he isn’t alone; he is quickly joined by another raptor represented by a life-size cardboard cutout! Together, the two “raptors” stalk Tim and Lex; played by the production’s Art Director John Bell and Art Department Coordinator Caroline Quinn. From here, video footage becomes intermixed with additional storyboards.

Carboard cutout raptor in foreground with raptor suit in background.

Head of the raptor suit looking toward the camera.

Lex (Caroline Quinn) and Tim (John Bell) crawling and hiding from the raptors.

Together, the two “kids” avoid the raptors by crawling around the kitchen floor between the long tables, similar to the final version of the film. However, in this version both kids climb into the cubby that is reflected against the shiny cabinetry (or in this video’s case, an actual mirror is used to sell the idea) as a raptor charges into it instead of them. The kids crawl away once again, but before the raptors can make another move, the park worker enters the kitchen from the pantry where he had been preparing the kids’ meal. The park worker, played by set designer John Berger, sees the raptors and drops the meal.

The park worker (John Berger) emerges from the pantry with the kids’ meal in tow, surprised by the sight of the raptors.

To protect himself and the children from the raptors, the park worker grabs a pair of knives that are nearby. Unfortunately, he is no match for the teeth and claws of the raptors as they both leap on top of him! The kids watch as the park worker is maimed by the vicious dinosaurs, but then take advantage of the distraction to escape from the kitchen. Of course, the raptors spot their exit… and it is only a matter of time before they catch up to them. (It is interesting to note that the freezer is not featured at all in this concept, despite it being used in some form in all the other versions.)

Knives can’t stop the raptors as the park worker meets his demise.

This storyboard/video hybrid was created by the film’s art department for director Steven Spielberg to see. It is unclear exactly when in the production this was made, but a good portion of the storyboards used were from later incarnations of the sequence (while also including some that have never been seen before). The raptor suit used is also unfinished, so this may have also been a concept to show off how it looked in the sequence for feedback on any desired tweaks. It’s also interesting that the pantry was once part of the set, as evidenced by blueprints that have been finding their way online; and this concept of the sequence shows why it was once included.

Section of blueprint featuring where the pantry was, beside the freezer.

Just when a fan, such as I, thinks they know all the production’s ideas that were brought to the table… something like this is found! Whether one agrees with the ideas in this concept or not, it is thrilling to see yet another variation of what could have been in the film. ‘Jurassic Park’ had a monumental production team, and this video proves once again just how free their ideas were allowed to shape the classic film we have today.

Be sure to also check out Jurassic Time‘s illustrated audio drama series, Rick Carter’s Jurassic Park, that explores an entirely different version of the film as envisioned by its production designer!

What do you think of this concept video? Do you think this would have been a better version of the sequence? Just who was this park worker? Share your comments down below!

See An Early Version Of ‘Jurassic Park’ With Concept Art & Storyboards In An EPIC Audio Drama

Experience an early version of ‘JURASSIC PARK’ through production designer Rick Carter’s adaptation of Michael Crichton’s final draft screenplay, brought to life in an entertaining audio drama with visual enhancements!

Watch the entire illustrated audio drama series, plus its introduction and teaser trailer, below.

RICK CARTER’S ‘JURASSIC PARK’ was an epic project born out of the dire 2020 pandemic lockdown. Author Derrick Davis, the creator of JURASSIC TIME and writer at JURASSIC OUTPOST, had acquired many rare and previously unseen selections of concept art, storyboards, scripts, and other materials related to the original ‘Jurassic Park’. One of the most interesting items he acquired was a unique script that had many elements that would eventually be scrapped, but would also shape the final film, and beyond.

The official history behind Jurassic Park’s screenwriting process had always included Michael Crichton, Malia Scotch Marmo, and David Koepp. During this time, the film’s production designer, Rick Carter, took on a bigger role than normal.

“I was brought onto ‘Jurassic Park’ about two years before we finally started shooting […] On most shows, the production designer is brought in and handed a script and asked to visualize it. Not so on this one. I was in on many early meetings with Steven where we would break down the scenes in the book and discuss which ones would work best for the film.”

-Rick Carter

In the beginning, Michael Crichton had provided several drafts of the screenplay for his novel before passing the pen to whoever would take a crack at future drafts. Director Steven Spielberg went on to film ‘HOOK’, as Jurassic Park’s production team continued to work.

“While Spielberg was doing ‘HOOK’, I would go to him with all these different ideas of how to make things work. It was a very managed production.”

-Rick Carter

One of the ways Rick Carter displayed his ideas was by crafting an entirely new script using much of Crichton’s as the backbone.

“After our last script meetings, I began collecting together my notes. I realized that the only way for me to see how the ideas might actually play out in the story was for me to “collage” them into Michael’s latest script. Well, one thing led to another and I found myself going through the entire story.”

-Rick Carter

Out of all the scripts written for ‘Jurassic Park’, Carter’s version is perhaps the most interesting. It includes the early process of making John Hammond a more sympathetic character, the sick triceratops replacing the sick stegosaurus, and other changes from Crichton that will feel more familiar to how the film ended up. At the same time, the script introduces some interesting changes that would not carry over. This includes using the opening of the novel at the Costa Rican clinic, a condensed version of the river sequence, the removal of Donald Gennaro, Hammond’s idea of recruiting Grant and Sattler to work at the park, the discovery of a raptor den secretly nestled far beyond their pen, trees that are deforested by the giant dinosaurs, and the inclusion of lava fields. There’s even an umbrella designed to look like a “spitter” that is used as a distraction against a velociraptor; an idea similarly used in ‘Jurassic World’.

A “spitter” umbrella from the gift shop, used in defense against a velociraptor.

It’s not every day that a production designer writes a screenplay to get his ideas across in order to make the film a success. But Rick Carter was a special production designer. While his version of the script would not end up being used for the film, it wasn’t his intent anyway. He simply wanted the best way to further continue the production progress of ‘Jurassic Park’, and he felt altering the script was the best way to do it.

But what if it had been made? What would it have been like? Would it have felt just as grand, just engaging, and just as memorable? Or would it have had its own unique flavor that no one else could have concocted?

Lava fields that Grant and the kids must traverse through.

After nearly 30 years since it had been written, Derrick Davis had discovered the script and wanted to know the answers to all of those questions. He decided the best way to experience this early version of the film was to bring it to life. This led to him teaming up with another fan of the franchise, music composer Bernard A. Kyer. Derrick presented him with the idea of creating an audio drama experience from the script. He would do this by using concept art, storyboards, and other official artwork to illustrate it; many of which had never been seen before. Bernard took the script and adjusted it to flow in this format, while Derrick went to several fans of ‘Jurassic Park’ that could perform various roles, including himself as Tim Murphy and John Hammond.

One of those fans suggested by Bernard was artist, filmmaker, and actor Joshua Malone; the voice of Ed Regis, Dr. Alan Grant, and Lex Murphy. He also provided the narration for the program’s teaser trailer and further consultation throughout. Other cast members include Jurassic Outpost’s Samantha Endres as Dr. Ellie Sattler, and Caleb Burnett as Dr. Ian Malcolm; as well as designer Casey Wayne Cook, Jr. as Dr. Henry Wu and others.

Within almost a year’s time, Bernard assembled all the character performances while providing the script narration and additional voices, such as Dennis Nedry. The process included mixing a vast library of sound effects, many obtained from the film itself to instill further authenticity. Once that was completed, he composed a fantastic music score to bring it all to life; inspired not only by John Williams but other composers like Jerry Goldsmith, James Horner, and Danny Elfman.

After the audio was completed, Derrick assembled all the artwork he could find to match what was described, while enhancing it for high definition. Despite obtaining rare materials for years, including an entire binder of storyboards from ‘Dinosaur Supervisor’ Phil Tippett‘s collection, there was still much more that he needed. One of the people he had been in contact with over the years that had a great source for artwork and storyboards from the film was fellow collector and fan Astríd Vega of The Jurassic Park Collection and its YouTube channel. Derrick had shared and discussed the Rick Carter script with her long ago, and had even offered her various voice roles in an earlier-proposed version of the audio drama. Tragically, Astríd passed away in May of 2019… almost a year since Derrick had finally met her in-person at Universal Studios Hollywood’s Jurassic Park 25th Anniversary Event in May of 2018. Without her collection that she had shared, large portions of the video for this audio drama would not have been possible. The production is dedicated in her memory.

From Jurassic Park’s 25th Anniversary Event at Universal Studios Hollywood, 2018. From left to right: Roberto Díaz, Matthew Danczak, Derrick Davis, Astríd Vega, & Brian Belukha.

Despite amassing quite a collection of original and official materials, there was still a need for additional artwork. This task was completed by fellow fan and artist Felipe Humboldt. Felipe created several character sketches and scenic paintings based on descriptions in the script, which sometimes differed greatly from how they ended up in the final film. It should also be noted that character appearances changed even during the process of the original production itself, creating unavoidable inconsistencies throughout. Felipe also illustrated some additional moments from the script where no official artwork existed or could be found.

Felipe Humboldt’s depiction of Dr. Alan Grant wearing a makeshift papoose with a baby raptor; Lex and Tim at his side.

The end result is a one-of-a-kind experience that was an ultimate labor of love from everyone involved. While the debate can rage forever if this early version of the film would have been better than what we got, it is still fascinating to see it performed in such a dramatic way. It is also great to finally have an engaging way of presenting the art from those who worked on the film, such as Art Director John Bell, instead of having it locked away or forgotten forever.

Derrick Davis thanks everyone in the production for bringing his dream to life and realizing the imaginations of those who worked so hard to create our cherished, classic film: ‘JURASSIC PARK’.

An early “raptor pen” concept by John Bell, which was also seen briefly in the background of Jurassic Park in the film; during the lunch scene, projected on a wall.

Learn more about Bernard’s process of crafting the sound design and music score for the illustrated audio drama by checking out each of his four in-depth articles from his site. Be sure to also hear Bernard’s album release of his music score for the project!

Be sure to watch the entire series for the ultimate experience of this early version of ‘JURASSIC PARK’! Also check out everything else available at JURASSIC TIME, including the John Hammond Memoir!

Poster Created by Casey Wayne Cook Jr.

Would this earlier version of the film have been better, or are you glad we ended up with the final film we got? Share your thoughts in the comments below!

This article includes quotes and information from ‘The Making Of Jurassic Park’ book, ‘Starlog’ and ‘Cinefantastique’ magazines, and additional public and private collections.

New ‘Jurassic World: Camp Cretaceous’ Season Three Teaser and Poster – Comes May 21!

You’ll be heading back to Isla Nublar sooner than you thought – all 10 episodes of season three of Jurassic World: Camp Cretaceous will hit Netflix on May 21!

Along with this announcement came a brand new poster and teaser trailer, giving us our first look at the new mystery dino: E750. Check out our breakdown of both below:

We got our first glimpse at this creature’s location towards the end of season two, and now our first close-up look at the creature itself:

“A sinister threat emerges on Isla Nublar” and we can’t wait for it! The poster shows where the creature was once housed, and the damage it did to escape:

You can check out the full gallery below showing screenshots from the teaser itself:

How excited are you for the upcoming season of Jurassic World: Camp Cretaceous? Will you be watching all 10 episodes on May 21st? Leave a comment down below to join the discussion!

New Look at iconic Jurassic Park prop in Youtube documentary

It may have been almost 28 years since the release of Jurassic Park, but it seems like we still get a fresh look at everyone’s favourite classic every year. And that is exactly what the new Youtube docs-series ‘Art of the Prop‘ will be doing tomorrow with their premiere episode featuring the iconic artwork from the Visitors’ Center mural.

Originally painted by artist Douglas Henderson, the massive glass mural depicted a prehistoric jungle scene, complete with a family of Parasaurs, a pair of Brachiosaurs, a Gallimimus and a Velociraptor, most notable for it’s terrifying shadow play in the film’s climax! It was briefly revisited in 2015’s Jurassic World, and even inspired a training room in its sequel Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom.

The documentary will showcase never before seen concept art, including a rare glimpse at all three sections of the mural and features an exclusive interview with Douglas Henderson.

Art of the Prop: Jurassic Park, Evolution of a Mural premieres March 7th at 7pm EST on YouTube.

Excited to get a close up glimpse of this piece of Jurassic-history? What other iconic props would you like to get up close and personal with? Sound off below!

Explore ‘Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis’ Through The Genesis Archives

After much anticipation, The Genesis Archives is now live! ‘Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis’ lovers across the ‘Jurassic’ fandom will be thrilled to find a plethora of JPOG content on this new site! Lucca (Lucca2951 on Twitter) posted the reveal earlier this week on Twitter:

The Genesis Archives site is the complete database for everything related to the fan favorite game.

The Genesis Archives is a non-official / fan encyclopedia for the 2003 game “Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis”.

The objective with this site is to hold most, if not all information ever given related to the game since the beginning of development to release. That includes the released content that comes in the multiple versions of the game, as well as cut content, development notes, and other type of stuff.


We hope to bring these archives in a clean-looking way to help immortalize this wonderful game and its legacy, we plan on adding all the content possible over time to get this site as complete as it can be!

You can spend hours exploring the different areas of The Genesis Archives, which include:

Operation Genesis: a detailed introduction to ‘Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis’

Characters: the characters that you’ll meet during the game, including movie established characters and original characters created for the game, and trivia about them

Dig Sites: maps and tips that will help you with fossil hunting

Dinosaurs: lists and details about the various carnivores and herbivores you’ll encounter, and how to care and feed them

Research: types of research you’ll need to build your park

Exercises: details the various tutorials and scenarios that help you learn the game

Missions: should you choose to accept them… missions you can complete in addition to the Campaign and Exercises

Timeline: dates relating to the development of ‘Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis’

Soundtrack: listen to tracks from the game soundtrack

Videos: game intros and trailers

Cut Content: all the various elements that were cut from the game

It’s very exciting to see JPOG get some recognition and a site dedicated to the best ‘Jurassic’ game! Thanks to Lucca for sharing the site with the fandom!

What is your favorite about Operation Genesis? Let us know in the comments!