Beyond The Gates SLAYS Another Episode With Unveiling of Jurassic World: Dominion Dreadnoughtus!

With Jurassic World Dominion now available on demand (and still playing in theatres!), the Beyond The Gates team are here to debut one of Mattel’s new dinosaurs featured in the movie… the long, lumbering Dreadnoughtus!

Last month we debuted the Epic Battle Pack which featured three electrifying slashing dinosaurs featured in the movie, but this month we’re slowing things down and taking a look at one of the (Jurassic) World’s most majestic creatures…

In this exciting episode your Jurassic host Chris is joined by the almighty Rafael Bencosme from Mattel’s design team, who walks us through the process of developing such a ginormous toy! He also discusses the other sauropods Mattel have made and shares insights into the design process.

Chris is also joined by lead visual effects supervisor from ILM David Vickery who talks us through the story of designing this dinosaur for Dominion, the development process with director Colin Trevorrow, and we see some never-before-seen renders of this dinosaur in the full!

This episode truly is not one to miss and we wanted to thank the team at Universal and Mattel, and of course the team at ILM for working with us to create this exciting behind the scenes look at one of Dominion’s new dinosaurs!

Watch the full episode for a deeper look at the making of this wonderful toy and if you haven’t already, head to Target.com to pre-order now!

There’s more very exciting items coming to Beyond The Gates in the coming months, stay tuned!

‘Jurassic Park’ Soundtrack By John Williams Gets A New 2-CD Release!

‘Jurassic Park’ has an earth-shattering music score that every fan of the films has always been blown away by. The memorable themes and cues expertly crafted by composer/conductor John Williams are filled with wonder, action, and intense horror that are forever engrained in our ears. Now, nearly 30 years after it was heard by the world, the music score to the classic film gets a definitive release in a brand-new 2-CD set from La-La Land Records. But how definitive is it, and what sets it apart? To learn that, let’s have a little “history lesson.”

In 1993, the soundtrack was released on CD in the form of a 70-minute album via MCA records (also available on cassette and LP). This 1-CD release was assembled by John Williams himself, combining some cues together to form certain tracks, and arranging it all in his own personal sequence. For example, the actual “End Credits” from the film happen in the middle of this album, titled as “Welcome To Jurassic Park.” Then at the end of the album the track titled “End Credits” is actually just the second half of the same cue. Why? We shall perhaps never know, but it is a very curious choice.

While the 1993 album featured a large chunk of the score it did leave off several cues, including the “T-Rex Chase” when our favorite Rex goes after Ellie and the others in the Jeep; the “History Lesson” Tim gives Grant as they attempt to decide which tour car they want to go in; and Mr. DNA’s whimsical music as he is “Stalling Around” in his cartoon while explaining how they obtained dino-DNA. Thankfully, in 2013 these cues, combined with a few more, were introduced as bonus tracks for a digital-only 20th Anniversary Release by Geffen Records. Not only was this an expanded release, but it also featured a brand-new remaster. (Note: Mondo also did a limited-edition LP release of this remaster, sans the bonus tracks.) Several of the previously unreleased cues were combined (despite chronologically being from different scenes), and in some cases omitted the tail end of some of the music. One of the most interesting additions was actually “Hungry Raptor,” which was the original version of the music for when Ellie is attacked by a raptor in the shed; followed by Muldoon’s death. In the film, only the middle portion of this cue is used, with the rest using music “tracked” from other scenes. Amusingly enough, the opening of the cue was first publicly heard during the end credits of the original ‘The Making Of ‘Jurassic Park” documentary that was narrated by James Earl Jones.

The 2013 release was a godsend for fans of the music score at the time. But just three years later, in 2016, La-La Land Records released a 2-CD expanded edition that was part of a 4-CD collection that had included John Williams’ score to ‘The Lost World: Jurassic Park’ (also expanded and remastered for the first time). Using the source from the 2013 remaster, they did further mastering of their own (producing even better sound quality) while also going back to the original elements and providing every cue of the score for the very first time. This included Grant’s realization of “You Bred Raptors?”, Dennis Nedry’s “Race to the Dock” after the T-Rex gets out, and even a cue that was not heard in the film at all known as “The Saboteur.” That cue was meant to score the scene where Nedry is left at his messy workstation as the camera pans over to his inconspicuous Barbasol can. In presenting the complete score, the set also separates the unnaturally combined cues of both previous releases so they can be heard on their own for the first time, and without a single note being cut off or faded out. It also featured an extensive booklet detailing the making of both films and scores.

While many units of the 2016 set were produced, it did eventually go out of print. This led to second-hand sellers taking over the reins of offering this presentation of the score to people online, often selling for well over $100. While the 1993 Album remains in print and the 2013 digital-only expansion remains online, neither offer the perfect sound quality or the complete score that the 2016 release contains.

Now six years later, La-La Land Records returns with a brand-new 2022 re-release. Only this time, it is focusing on just ‘Jurassic Park,’ with some additional improvements to truly make this be the definitive release of the first score for the series:

La-La Land Records, Universal Studios and Amblin Entertainment, Universal Music Group and Geffen Records present JURASSIC PARK, a limited 2-CD re-issue presentation of maestro John Williams’ (JAWS, STAR WARS, SCHINDLER’S LIST) original motion picture scores to the 1993 blockbuster JURASSIC PARK starring Sam Neill, Laura Dern and Jeff Goldblum and directed by Steven Spielberg. Williams’ monumental JURASSIC PARK score teems with thematic orchestral wonder and is celebrated as one of the composer’s most accomplished works. Produced, edited and mastered by Mike Matessino, (with fresh outputs of the 192k/24 bit master files utilized in our 2016 collection) this re-issue utilizes that material to re-create the original 1993 soundtrack album. This is featured on Disc 2 and is followed by the source music track “Stalling Around” (the composer’s homage to classic Warner Bros. cartoon music for Jurassic’s “Mr. DNA” sequence). Disc 1 showcases the entire main Score Presentation, which now includes, for the first time, the performances and mixes of “Journey To the Island” and “Dennis Steals The Embryo” as heard in the film. The 28-page CD booklet features liner notes by Matessino (adapted from our 2016 collection) and the new art design is by Jim Titus. This is a limited edition of 5000 Units.

As mentioned, having the film-version performances and mixes of both “Journey To The Island” and “Dennis Steals The Embryo” are quite special. Sometimes, the film performance or “version” of a cue can be different than what is presented on the released albums. In this case, neither had ever been heard before, apart from the film itself. In the film, and now on this new release, “Journey To The Island” features a bit of a faster and more timed tempo of the adventurous “Island Theme,” most notably a snappier pace when it transitions to the park visitors beginning their ride in the Jeeps. The moment for when the Brachiosaur appears is also now properly timed to how it is in the film, as well as later when the Jeeps begin their ride to the Visitor Center. “Dennis Steals The Embryo” fixes a mixing issue that has somehow always been present on every single release: the orchestra had been improperly mixed against the synth. Now it can be heard properly mixed, as it is in the film, for the very first time.

The inclusion of a rebuilt/remastered version of the 1993 Album is a nice addition on the second disc (where the Mr. DNA “source music” was decidedly put since it couldn’t fit on the first CD). Whatever qualms anyone may have had (such as myself) with that initial release, for many it is a bit nostalgic to hear the takes/mixes/editorial choices John Williams had created for it. In fact, for some fans of the score, the takes John Williams preferred for the album of certain cues are preferable to them as well! With this release, you get the best of both worlds by having it all together, and all sounding the best it ever has.

The booklet included in this release is very much the same as the one from the 2016 release, but of course only focuses on ‘Jurassic Park’ this time. The artwork and layout is a bit different this time, making it unique enough to be different from the former release. There are some additional credits this time as well, including a special thanks to yours truly due to years of nerdy insight made on old forum posts (as well as Jurassic Outpost friend Bernard Kyer).

By far the most important aspect of this release isn’t what is new, but simply the fact that it is available again. Generations of old and new film score fans, and even those who would like to study such a masterful score as this, should have a comprehensive presentation that is accessible. As good as the previous releases were for their time, having every single cue available, and now different variations of them, is integral for preserving this important milestone of music.

If you have never purchased the music score to ‘Jurassic Park’ before, this release is a massive no-brainer. It is the definitive release, finally back in print and with some great new inclusions that bests every release that came before it. If you only have the 1993 Album or the digital 2013 release, I can promise you that this is still worth getting. It’s presented in a much better way, and with much better sound. For those that have the 2016 CD set paired with ‘The Lost World: Jurassic Park’… I can understand skipping this. There may not be enough to fully justify shelling out more money for it again, but that will just depend on who you are.

Since this is my favorite music score of all time, to my favorite film of all time… the choice was pretty easy. This new edition is a must-have. And who knows, perhaps ‘The Lost World: Jurassic Park’ will be similarly visited down the line? Maybe even ‘Jurassic Park 3’? We can only hope!

But don’t just take my word for it. Listen to some of the clips for yourself below! Then, be sure to order your copy today from La-La Land Records!

TRACK LISTING (with select sound clips):

CD 1

SCORE PRESENTATION

1 Opening Titles :37

2 Incident at Isla Nublar (Film Version) 2:23

3 The Encased Mosquito 1:16

4 Entrance of Mr. Hammond 1:09

5 Journey to the Island (Film Version) 8:54

6 Hatching Baby Raptor (Film Version) 2:04

7 You Bred Raptors? :40

8 The History Lesson (Film Version) 1:33

9 Jurassic Park Gate 2:05

10 Goat Bait 2:26

11 The Saboteur :47

12 Ailing Triceratops 2:37

13 The Coming Storm (Film Version) 1:26

14 Dennis Steals the Embryo (Film Version) 5:04

15 Race to the Dock 1:18

16 The Falling Car and The T-Rex Chase 4:59

17 A Tree for My Bed 2:13

18 Remembering Petticoat Lane 2:49

19 My Friend, the Brachiosaurus(Film Version) 1:51

20 Life Finds a Way 1:27

21 System Ready :50

22 To the Maintenance Shed 4:13

23 High Wire Stunts 4:10

24 Hungry Raptor 2:10

25 The Raptor Attack 2:50

26 T-Rex Rescue and Finale 7:43

27 Welcome to Jurassic Park (Film Version) 7:58

Total Time Disc 1: 77:44

CD 2

1993 ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACK

1 Opening Titles :36

2 Theme From Jurassic Park 3:27

3 Incident at Isla Nublar 5:22

4 Journey to the Island 8:55

5 The Raptor Attack 2:50

6 Hatching Baby Raptor 3:22

7 Welcome to Jurassic Park 7:57

8 My Friend, the Brachiosaurus 4:18

9 Dennis Steals the Embryo 5:03

10 A Tree for My Bed 2:13

11 High Wire Stunts 4:10

12 Remembering Petticoat Lane 2:49

13 Jurassic Park Gate 2:05

14 Eye to Eye 6:35

15 T-Rex Rescue and Finale 7:43

16 End Credits 3:27

BONUS

17 Stalling Around 2:41

Total Time Disc 2: 73:35


Are you going to get this new release? What’s your favorite cue from this soundtrack? Share your thoughts in the comments below, and as always stay tuned to Jurassic Outpost for the latest!

An Extensive Fan Review Of ‘Jurassic World: Dominion’

The following review was submitted to us by Neelis/Dinosaur Habitat.


Dinosaurs rule the world once more in ‘Jurassic World: Dominion’. Is it epic? Is it the conclusion to the ‘Jurassic Park’ and ‘Jurassic World’ franchises, as promised by the tagline? Does Giganotosaurus truly want to watch the world burn? And what does a gig at BioSyn pay when you are a swashbuckling mathematician?   

Originally slated for a June 2021 release, but postponed by a year due to the Covid-19 pandemic, ‘Jurassic World: Dominion’ has been making its way into cinemas across the globe ahead of the US premiere on June 10, 2022.

Reception by audiences and critics has been mixed so far, though the early release has been a financial success; however, monetary profits do not equal quality, so how does ‘Jurassic World: Dominion’ hold up?

‘Jurassic World: Dominion’ – the story

Picking up four years after ‘Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom’ (2018), Claire Dearing (Bryce Dallas Howard) is still haunted by the past; trying to atone for her mistakes and feeling a deep sense of duty towards the dinosaurs, she has moved on from rallying the public and politicians to more radical measures, raiding illegal dinosaur breeding facilities to expose them and have authorities shut down the awful practices conducted there.

Despite their earlier romantic struggles, Claire and former Velociraptor-trainer Owen Grady (Chris Pratt) have made a pretty nice home for themselves and rebellious Maisie Lockwood (Isabella Sermon), who they’ve taken under their wings after her grandfather’s death.

It isn’t long before their peaceful life is disturbed; Velociraptor Blue turns up at their cabin in the woods. And Blue is not alone; she has a baby, whose origins are a mystery.

Both the baby Velociraptor and Maisie are kidnapped by a bunch of nameless poachers, led by over-the-top bad guy Rainn Delacourt (Scott Haze).

Owen and Claire give chase; with the help of Franklin Webb (Justice Smith) they learn Maisie is headed to Malta, where illegal dinosaur fights are being held by more anonymous, unpleasant people, and dinosaurs are sold for excessive amounts of money, the trades conducted by delightfully devious, and criminally underused, Soyona Santos (Dichen Lachman).

Owen and Claire briefly reunite with Barry (Omar Sy) and find an unexpected ally in veteran pilot Kayla Watts (DeWanda Wise), who agrees to fly them to Biosyn Valley, a sanctuary for recaptured dinosaurs and other resurrected prehistoric creatures.

Parallel to Claire and Owen’s story runs another tale; the one of Dr. Ellie Sattler (Laura Dern) investigating the mysterious appearance of swarms of gigantic locusts, feeding on crops throughout the United States, destroying harvests as they swoop down and gorge on anything the farmlands offer.

Believing Biosyn is responsible, she asks her former love-interest and old friend Dr. Alan Grant (Sam Neill) for help with her quest for evidence; invited by a familiar acquaintance, Sattler and Grant journey to the dinosaur sanctuary located deep in the Italian Dolomites. 

Touring Biosyn’s facility under the guidance of Ramsay Cole (Mamoudou Athie), Grant and Sattler are welcomed by Dr. Lewis Dodgson (Campbell Scott), who seems more aloof than an evil genius. Alas, do not judge a book by its cover; as with ‘Jurassic World’ (2015) and ‘Fallen Kingdom’, shady stuff is going on right under everyone’s noses, including Dr. Ian Malcolm’s (Jeff Goldblum) who lectures at Biosyn for a handsome stipend, and who extended the invitation to Dr. Sattler.

Will the familiar trio manage to expose Dodgson before everything goes pear-shaped?

Through a series of high-adrenaline adventures, the two groups eventually come together in Biosyn Valley and must not only fight for their own survival, but for the chance to reveal the truth.

‘Jurassic World: Dominion’ – the verdict

The story of ‘Jurassic World: Dominion’ begins, of course, in 1993; Steven Spielberg’s ‘Jurassic Park’, based on Michael Crichton’s novel of the same name, enthralled audiences of all ages and demographics. Never before had dinosaurs been so realistically and dynamically depicted on screen.

At the time, critics lauded the visual effects but quite a few were less complimentary when it came to the human characters; they were seen as somewhat two-dimensional, entirely in service of the spectacular animatronics and CGI.

‘Jurassic Park’’s success spawned two sequels; ‘The Lost World: Jurassic Park’ (1997), based on another Michael Crichton novel, and ‘Jurassic Park III’ (2001).

After the third film, the franchise seemed to have been given up on by Universal. Rumors about a possible fourth film, and even a few announcements of it having entered active pre-production, swirled, but it would take fourteen years before the dinosaurs made a successful return in ‘Jurassic World’ (2015) and ‘Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom’ (2018).  

What has endured most amongst fans, almost ironically, is a deeply rooted love for the original characters; Dr. Grant, Dr. Sattler and Dr. Malcolm inspired generations to seek out careers in palaeontology and science.

Dr. Ian Malcolm in particular remains incredibly popular amongst film enthusiasts; and Jeff Goldblum delights in the character’s popularity, having reprised the role not just in sequel films, but a car commercial and the various ‘Jurassic World: Evolution‘ games.

This popularity only made it a matter of time before Grant, Sattler and Malcolm would return to the world of dinosaur escapades. But with five returning leading characters, three returning supporting characters (though two are really cameos), four newcomers, one renewed villain, and Maisie’s story continuing too, do they get a chance to truly shine?

Unfortunately, the answer is no. ‘Jurassic World: Dominion’ tries to squeeze in so much everyone’s individual stories are bogged down, even with the gargantuan runtime of two-and-a-half hours.

Most of the time it feels more as if the entire film’s a comedic approach rather than a serious continuation of the series and a re-introduction of beloved characters; Dr. Malcolm talks, but his words, unlike his dire warnings and razor-sharp analysis in both ‘Jurassic Park’ and ‘The Lost World’, are hollow, meaningless; even his rivalry with Dodgson can’t reach the heights of the adversarial quips traded with Peter Ludlow (Arliss Howard) in ‘The Lost World’.

And so it goes on; Dr. Sattler and Dr. Grant have surprisingly little to add, aside from their own little mystery-espionage adventure, and are written rather abysmally.

A completely  ridiculous subplot is introduced, erasing things we learned (or thought we’d learned) in ‘Fallen Kingdom’ regarding Maisie’s origin story, which is now so muddled and contrived (the “Benjamin Lockwood – John Hammond fallout”-spiel makes no sense at all now), it defies any desire of exploring it further.

Claire and Owen, by comparison, have a more straightforward and slightly more serious arc, and given their history there is a surprisingly touching moment between Claire and Owen on Kayla’s aircraft. Owen, having taken on the role as surrogate dad, is far less goofy, a welcome approach. Both Kayla and Ramsay are appreciated additions to the story, though they get far too little screentime (Ramsay’s character especially suffers from the bloated cast of characters).

The dinosaurs and other prehistoric animals, too, feel underused. Most of them only appear once, dutifully carry out their parts in the story, then are gone just as quickly as Delacourt and Santos.

With the exception of the (very effective) reveal of the Therizinosaurus, the introductions of the dinosaurs are distinctly underwhelming; they aren’t helped by some unimpressive CGI work and highly disappointing animatronics. Not once do they reach the greatness of Stan Winston and his team’s work on the original ‘Jurassic Park’ films.

And though it was heralded as the new big bad dinosaur, Giganotosaurus turns out to be the chillest theropod in the franchise. It lumbers around a bit, and even gives half-hearted chase to our heroes once, but it mainly being absent from the larger part of the film is what stands out most.

By comparison, the mystery of the locusts, admittedly and pleasantly, feels as if it came straight out of a Michael Crichton novel. And some of the humour in the film (“he slid into my DMs”) truly works and draws hearty laughs.

For all its flaws, and Colin Trevorrow’s insistence of them not featuring when ‘Jurassic World’ entered production sometime in 2013, ‘Jurassic World: Dominion’ now introduces feathered dinosaurs, some of them first seen in ‘The Prologue‘ (2022); it’s a radical and deeply appreciated step forward for the franchise – the fierce Pyroraptor especially is a fabulously spectacular plunderer, echoing the memory of ‘Jurassic Park III’’s marvelous Velociraptors.

A tighter, more competently written story, shorter runtime and less filler-characters might have made for a better, more entertaining film. Even though the pace is high and everyone’s continuously horse-riding, driving, cycling, running and flying from set-piece to set-piece, I found myself bored at times because it was hard to keep up with the action, and also, about halfway, hard to care for what was going on. 

The absence of any tension and playing it safe to please a very wide demographic (of fans) takes away any edge it otherwise might have had.

At times the film’s more ‘Bourne’ or ‘Mission: Impossible‘ than ‘Jurassic Park’ / ‘Jurassic World’. As a friend described it; the film feels very much as if you’re watching a string of excellent video game levels.

Is it epic? No. Is it the conclusion? Also no. The open end, unfortunately, hints at more to come. I’m hoping Trevorrow and Universal Studios will hand over the reins to other writers and directors; preferably filmmakers who aren’t hardcore fans of the original films and therefore capable of taking a step back, critically evaluating what does and does not work, only then to come up with engaging, intriguing stories and characters.

‘Jurassic World: Dominion’ has its heart in the right place, but the execution is dreadful. Though it will no doubt make an obscene amount of money over the coming summer, it’s not destined to become a classic. One thing is clear; dinosaurs will rule cinemas once again and they, unlike that tagline’s promise, are very much here to stay.


Do you agree with this fan review, or do you have a different view? Share your thoughts below, and as always stay tuned to Jurassic Outpost for the latest!

San Diego Comic-Con 2022 – Everything Jurassic You Need to Know!

Jurassic Outpost is heading to San Diego Comic-Con 2022! We hope to see you there, but even if you’re enjoying the news and festivities from afar, we’ve got everything you need to know for everything Jurassic and dinosaur-related at this year’s con!



JURASSIC-RELATED:


‘Jurassic World: The Ultimate Pop-Up’ Author Matthew Reinhardt with Insight Editions

7/21/2022 | 2:00 PM | Booth #2135

Join Insight Editions on Thursday to meet authors including Ashley Eckstein, Matthew Reinhart, Jenn Fujikawa, and more. Insight Editions CEO Raoul Goff, VP of Licensing & Partnerships Vanessa Lopez, and VP & Editorial Director Vicki Jaeger will also be on hand and make themselves available to chat. There will also be sneak peeks of incredible new pop culture products from Matthew Reinhart’s new Insight Editions imprint Reinhart Pop-Up Studio!


Toys Find A Way: Behind the Scenes and Screams of Jurassic World Dinosaur Design

7/22/2022 | 11:00 AM-12:00 PM | Booth #3029

The Mattel Jurassic World Design Team will take fans behind the curtain of creating the toys based on dinosaurs from Jurassic World: Dominion. Designers Rafael Bencosme, Chandra Hicks, Greg Murphy, and Nikolai Dryuchin will be on hand for a Q&A, first-ever product reveals, trivia, and giveaways!


The Science of Jurassic World

7/22/2022 | 6:00-7:00 PM | Grand 12 & 13, Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina

In the Jurassic World movies, the dinosaurs get from the island park to our cities and wilderness. Scientists who are fans of the franchise explore the real-world science of bringing dinosaurs back to life and letting them loose. What do the films get right and wrong about these extinct creatures? What are the technical challenges and ethical considerations of re-creating and genetically tinkering with different species? What is the impact of introducing megafauna into different environments? Once dinos are loose, what rights do they have to survive? Does life really find a way? This team of scientists includes paleontologist Stuart Sumida (technical consultant, Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom, Camp Cretaceous), herpetologist Earyn McGee (Find That Lizard), conservation biologist Sam Wynns, cell and developmental biologist Claire Meaders, paleontologist Gabriel Santos, and geneticist, ecologist, and sci-fi author J. Dianne Dotson (Questrison Saga). Moderated by James Floyd (podcast host, Star Wars-ologies; regular freelance contributor, Star Wars Insider magazine).


Production Design: The Jurassic Park Saga: A Design 65 Million Years in the Making

7/23/2022 | 4:30-5:30 PM | Room 29CD

It’s the end of a Jurassic era. From the world it takes place in (the sets), to the creatures, vehicles, props and so much more, the production design is what makes the words on the page come to life on screen. The process begins with the vision of the production designer and continues with hours of research, and months of collaboration with the director, cinematographer, and an army of art department and visual effects artists. The Art Directors Guild brings you some of the foremost designers who have worked on the six-film Jurassic Park saga to share their processes, techniques, and experiences. Panelists include Doug Meerdink (Jurassic World, Jurassic Park 3), Stefan Dechant (The Lost World: Jurassic Park, Jurassic Park), Ed Verreaux (Jurassic Park III, Jurassic World), John Bell (Jurassic Park), and Lauren Polizzi (The Lost World: Jurassic Park). Moderated by Michael Allen Glover (Station 11, The Alienist: Angel of Darkness).


Musical Anatomy of a Superhero: Film & TV Composer Panel hosted by Jurassic World franchise composer Michael Giacchino

7/21/2022 | 11:00 AM-12:00 PM | Indigo Ballroom, Hilton San Diego Bayfront

Composers Ludwig Göransson (Black Panther: Wakanda Forever), Natalie Holt (Batgirl, Loki), Nami Melumad (Thor: Love and Thunder), Christophe Beck (Shazam! Fury of the Gods, Ant-Man and the Wasp: Quantumania), Amie Doherty (She-Hulk: Attorney at Law), and moderator Michael Giacchino (The Batman, Thor: Love and Thunder, Spiderman: No Way Home) discuss the challenges of creating the musical landscape of the superhero genre and explain the process through unreleased music and video clips from upcoming and recently released projects. Music has always played an important supporting character in films and TV. This is especially evident in the superhero genre, where the music clearly sets the tone that defines a character, an impending battle, or a triumphant moment. Introductions by Ray Costa (producer, Costa Communications).


DINOSAUR-RELATED OR NON-JURASSIC-RELATED:


Dinotopia: Reborn

7/21/2022 | 7:30-8:30 PM | Room 10

Dinotopia, the hugely popular, critically acclaimed series based on James Gurney’s bestselling books, is currently running on Crackle. While fans thought the show had gone extinct, a new series is in the works. Producer Jordan Kerner (Clifford the Big Red Dog, Smurfs) and Matt Loze (president of scripted entertainment & production at Halcyon Studios) offer sneak peeks and discuss the new adaptation of this beloved series. Moderated by Chris Woolsey (senior director of communications, Crackle Plus).


Stay tuned for more information, and follow Jurassic Outpost for all Jurassic updates from SDCC!


Jurassic World Alive Celebrates Four Years of Gameplay!

Calling all Jurassic World Alive players, and in case you missed it: Jurassic World Alive is celebrating four years of gameplay this year! Read on for more about the milestone, four years of gameplay statistics, and a new sweepstakes for a trip to a Universal Studios resort!



From Universal, Jam City, and Ludia:

Jurassic World Alive, Jam City and Ludia’s award-winning geo-located game featuring the fiercest dinosaurs from Universal’s Jurassic World franchise, is celebrating its fourth anniversary this month! Jurassic World Alive has been downloaded by over 32 million players worldwide and played for over 20 billion minutes, equivalent to over 38,000 years!!

To celebrate this 4-year milestone and ahead of the Jurassic World: Dominion film release on June 10, we released a new live action trailer featuring just some of the iconic dinosaurs in Jurassic World Alive, including fan-favorite raptor Blue, Beta and the iconic T. rex as they inhabit the player’s world, wherever they are.

In addition to the limited-time thematic events always taking place in the game, players will be able to get up close to creatures found in the new theatrical release thanks to a free Jurassic World Dominion scent that will be waiting in players’ game mailboxes from June 8! When activated, scents attract select dinosaurs to appear near the player’s location. Players will also have the opportunity to capture and unlock new prolific dinosaurs through the month of June from the films including Giganotosaurus, the formidable big baddie from the new Jurassic World: Dominion film.

Additional Jurassic World Alive milestones players have achieved the past four years include:

Total Creatures Unlocked: Nearly 400 million

Total T. rexes Unlocked: 1.95 million

Total Darts Fired: 38 quintillion 

Total PVP Battles: 729 million

Total Supply Drops Spun: Nearly 6.2 billion

Universal, Jam City, and Ludia will also be hosting a sweepstakes where one lucky winner plus three guests will be invited to their choice of Universal Studios Resort, in either Hollywood or Orlando. Details can be found here.

The sweepstakes is open to age 18+ residents of the United States and Canada. Runner ups also have the chance to win Jurassic-themed Mystery Boxes and special in-game rewards.



Check out the Jurassic World Alive Dinosaur Day 2022 Trailer below!



Congratulations to Universal, Jam City, and Ludia on the success of Jurassic World Alive and four years of gameplay! What are your thoughts on Jurassic World Alive? Are you a regular player, and if so, how have you been celebrating the anniversary? Let us know in the comments and check out gameplay screenshots below!