Jurassic World Captivz Collection: Minifigures With a Premium Bite

In the years leading up to the release of Jurassic World, there was a dire drought of cool merchandising to collect – however, since 2018 the market has certainly roared to life. There’s no shortage of fun Jurassic merch, so it often takes something special to really catch our eyes.

Thankfully the Captivz collection does just that by featuring the best mini Jurassic World dinosaurs out there.

Captivz: Original Edition collection compared to Cryo Can for scale

The new line of Pop ‘N Lock figures comes from Toy Monster, an Australian based company, which is where the line is currently for sale. But don’t worry – international availability is planned for 2021, and these new dinos should find their way nearer you soon!

So, what are Captivz? Here is official description for the Original Collection currently available in Australia:

With a collection of species and duplicates, players can challenge friends to battle rounds based on species, Aggression or Intelligence powers – the bigger your dinosaur army is, the stronger your defence line is and the more chance you have to win points and become the ultimate Captivz champion. Over 15 Pop n’ Lock Jurassic World dinosaurs are roaring to hatch out of slime eggs, including Rare, Ultra-Rare and Limited Edition metallic species. So un-wrap, crack and ooze your way through slime to reveal your mystery species – Pop n’ Lock your dinosaur and then, get ready to battle!

The collection includes: Blue, Blue (Gold), T. rex, T. rex (Silver), Indoraptor, Indoraptor (Bronze), Delta, Baryonyx, Stegosaurus, Sinoceratops, Triceratops, Stygimoloch, Pteranodon, Mosasaurus, Brachiosurus, and Indominus Rex.

They retail currently around 7 AUD (which converts to around $5), and pack a lot of bite for such a small price. As I said earlier, these are in my honest opinion the best Jurassic minifigs out there. Each dino comes in 3 parts for easy Pop-N-Lock assembly, and measure roughly 3 inches long, give or take. In size, they’re comparable to Mattel’s blind bag figures, but feel more solid, and are sculpted with far more detail. Likewise, the paint applications are often very impressive, calling to mind Papo with natural weathering and fine detailing.

And that’s where these figures really impress – not only are most clearly built from the ILM models, sporting eye pleasing accuracy and dynamic poses – they also often sport sharper sculpting and painting details than the core Mattel 3.75″ action figure line. This extra attention to detail shines: these catch the eyes even from a distance, and are easily recognizable to their film counterparts.

Take the Captivz Stygimoloch (one of my favorites), and compare it against the Mattel Attack Pack Stiggy ($7.99 MSRP) – despite the far smaller size and cheaper price, it sports an appearance more authentic to the films (that’s not a diss against Mattel there, but a commendation to the Captivz team). I can’t say enough good things for the detail (plus price), and I really believe Jurassic fans won’t want to miss out on this collection as it expands with new species in the future.

Or compare the Sinoceratops to the Mattel Sound Strike Sinoceratops – despite being dwarfed, its detail is more finely tuned and realistic looking. Captivz also make good use of compromises at the scale, such as the solid black eyes with a white paint reflection detail, which really bring the soul of this tiny dino to life.

While this line has no solid scale, with each dinosaur figure roughly the same size, they do pair quite well with 3.75″ action figures – if you consider them hatchlings. While the line focuses on adult dinos, it does feature one curious exception – the Stegosaurus. This adorable little dino might not fit with the rest of the line, but it looks phenomenal with a surprisingly detailed paint application, and pairs well with Mattel’s human figures, even if wholly unintended.

If you’re in Australia, you can hunt these down yourself at retailers such as Kmart – Otherwise, you can keep checking our site, or check out the official Jurassic World Captivz website here! We’re excited to see how this line evolves going into the future, and will have continued coverage on our site, including a hands on video soon.

Are you looking for new Jurassic Park merch to collect? Let us know what you think of the Captivz line below, and as always, stay tuned for all the latest news!

Could Jurassic World: Dominion change release date?

June 11, 2021. That was the release date announced for Jurassic World: Dominion back in February of 2018, nearly four months before Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom even hit global theaters. Here we are a little over two and a half years later and that still remains the scheduled release date. But could a change for the release date be on the horizon? There has been no official word or announcement for a change, but we strongly feel that something is likely inevitable for several reasons.

Before we dive into why we feel a change of the release date is coming, let’s first note that the date of June 11, 2021 is a perfect date for Dominion as it is exactly 28 years after the original film, Jurassic Park, hit theaters on June 11, 1993. Viewed as the conclusion of a six film story arc, though more films in the series are likely to come, Dominion sharing the June 11th date with the original film gave the fans a little extra nostalgic excitement.

So why might Dominion decide to shift dates? The biggest factor is Covid-19, the virus that has spread around the world causing the current pandemic this planet is dealing with. Movie theaters have closed for extended periods of time, some have re-opened only to close again and some have shut their doors for good as they couldn’t handle the financial blow. Film studios have delayed most films scheduled to hit theaters in 2020 and all films currently under production shut down in March, and only a few have resumed filming.

Dominion was no different as they had to shut down production on March 13th and after spending $5 million for new safety protocols that included testing of cast and crew on a consistent basis and constantly sanitizing the set, production resumed on July 6th. It was actually the first major Hollywood film to resume filming, and a few others started back up shortly after. As of today it is believed that Dominion has only a few more weeks of filming and should be wrapped by the end of October. There have been no major delays since filming resumed in July, but that has not been the case of all Hollywood movies that returned. Shortly after resuming, Warner Brothers’ The Batman had to re-shut down production for a couple weeks after star Robert Pattinson got Covid-19.

The four month delay in filming alone for Dominion had many fans and media outlets speculating that the film might see a delay in it’s theatrical release. Director Colin Trevorrow just last month though told the French entertainment website Premiere that the filming schedule remained right on time despite the four month postponement. Coupled with the fact that filming has seemed to run smoothly since returning and Universal has maintained June 11, 2021 as the release date, it has a lot of people thinking the film will still hit on that date.

So it seems the film itself has enough time to be finished properly in time for June, but there are several more factors that might just knock it out of that spot. Another major reason is all the shifting of films that were scheduled for 2020 that are now in 2021 and other films in 2021 that have been delayed weeks and months. For the most part film studios, when shifting their other films, have steered clear of Dominion’s release date. However some news that broke just a few days ago could be one of the biggest signs of a potential move as Fast and Furious 9, which originally was scheduled for this past May, had been delayed until April 2021 but now has shifted again to May 28, 2021. That is only two weeks prior to Dominion’s release.

That is a potential big deal as Fast and Furious 9 is also a Universal Pictures film and the idea that studio would release films from their two biggest franchises just 14 days apart seems extremely unlikely. Especially not when both films, in a non-pandemic world are all but guaranteed to gross $1 billion+ worldwide. There might be a chance Universal could be OK with the third weekend of Fast and Furious 9 going against the opening weekend of Dominion, but the potential box office haul for both films could take a hit as both films have a similar target audience. That doesn’t seem like something a studio would be willing to risk with two of their own films when they could easily put a bigger span of weeks between releases. Which makes us think that Universal might have already decided to relocate Dominion to a later date prior to announcing the Fast and Furious 9 date shift, but has yet to publicly announce it.

The other big factor is the movie theater landscape itself. Many theaters are struggling to stay afloat and with Disney moving tentpole films, like Black Widow to 2021, some are expected to close and might never re-open. There was talk earlier this year that almost 40% of all movie theaters in China might close permanently and there is a fear that could also be the case domestically. A lot of theaters that are still open, showing the one or two new films that did release recently or pulling classic films out the archive are operating at limited capacity, most seemingly in the 25% range. If the pandemic is not completely over by June 2021, and that means a global vaccine that is deemed safe and easily readily available to everyone, theaters might remained closed or continue to operate a low capacity. For a film like Dominion that would likely be expected to have a domestic opening north of $150 million or possibly even closer to $200 million, that could greatly damage those returns. Would Universal be better to delay the film’s release until after pandemic and get the full opening or settle for an opening that sadly might be 25-50% of what it could have made?

The best possible news for Dominion in this current world we live in is that like we noted above, filming is likely to wrap by the end of the month. As long as filming faces no major bumps during these next few weeks, the film will be in the can and it goes completely into post-production. Productions that are still underway or in pre-production have the biggest uncertainty as they never know if Covid-19 might them and force a shut down or potentially force certain films to never even be made. There will be some relief that that all that will remain is post-production and the sets, locations, tight quarters of filming will be concluded.

If Dominion does indeed shift dates as we feel there is a strong chance it will, when might we see it in theaters? There are a few options that could prove to be more ideal. Could it move one month into July? Maybe not, unless other films move again, as July 2021 is pretty much jammed pack with the likes of Top Gun: Maverick, Minions: The Rise of Gru, Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings and Jungle Cruise. After July, a blockbuster the size of a Jurassic film would likely either shift to the following Summer or maybe go a different route and target the Holiday season.

Universal’s marketing could choose to use the icy locals of Dominion to help push the film into the cold months of November or December. Avatar 2 was originally scheduled for December 17, 2021 but has since moved to December 16, 2022 because of Covid-19 related delays to their production. While the third Spider-Man film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe moved into the December 17th date currently, if Dominion would decide to move there, it is likely Spider-Man would shift again.

The safest move and the one that probably makes the most sense is for Dominion to just move completely out of 2021 and shift an entire year. In May of this year, during the height of the pandemic, Universal made sure to claim the date of June 10, 2022 for an “event film”. It almost feels like Universal might have been thinking ahead for Jurassic, claiming the second Friday in June, just like 1993’s Jurassic Park and 2015’s Jurassic World had. While a full year delay would greatly disappoint fans, especially since the film will enter post-production next month and the release would change from being just 8 months away to 20 months away. But it wouldn’t be an unheard of move in Hollywood right now, films such as Black Widow, Jungle Cruise, Fast and Furious 9, A Quiet Place Part II, Godzilla Vs Kong and Halloween Kills to name a few all moved a year or more due to the pandemic.

Right now the release date remains June 11, 2021, but there are some signs starting to mount that it might not remain there. Do you think it will keep it’s current release date? Or you think it will move? If so, when would be a good time for it to be released in your opinion? Please let us know your thoughts in the comments section down below!

The Lost World of ‘Jurassic Park: England’

It was a digital landscape that sometimes we think time wishes it could forget. Before Facebook or Twitter, Instagram or Tumblr, even before Myspace. It was an age when the internet wasn’t quite in its infancy, but more of an awkward transitional phase, as everyday it seemed new sites, forums and chat rooms came and went.

Today the graveyards of Archive.org are littered with the remnants of this now bygone era and provide a fascinating insight into the Jurassic Park fandom. Full of forgotten fanfics, early rumors of a “Jurassic Park 4” and maybe if you’re lucky some old screencaps and fan art, there is one page in particular that stands out. A place many once heard of and few probably remember, it was only recently that it was rediscovered.

Almost lost forever and forgotten by most, Jurassic Park: England (or “JP:UK” as it was also known) was a website chronicling a labor of love undertaken by British fan Andy Simpson and his quest to create a patch of prehistoric paradise in his own garden. Seemingly inspired by “Jurassic Park: The Ride” and then then recent Jurassic Park III, you can guarantee no expense was spared.

With some reports estimating that Andy spent about £4,000, the attraction included a 20ft. river safari through primeval overgrowth, smoky banks and of course a 15ft. recreation of the infamous “King Kong gates” that loomed over guests in the movie. All of this ending in a home theater where guests could join its creator in a private screening of his favorite films.  “I’ve seen Jurassic Park over 300 times!” Simpson told reporters back in 2001. “I watched the films over and over ’cause each time I’d notice new things to re-create.” he also commented.

 

The attraction itself was by no means easy to build. According to Andy, besides the two years and countless hours needed to construct the massive attraction, it was also required to meet certain standards from the local council in order to entertain guests. Luckily for him however, “Jurassic Park: England” came just short of the required dimensions for some serious urban planning. As, if that wasn’t enough to consider, Simpson had to reach out to Steven Speilberg and Universal themselves for their blessing to use the Jurassic Park name and iconography. With little in his favor and probably as much chance as the cast of Jurassic Park had escaping the jaws of a hungry t-rex, Universal and Speilberg’s company actually reached out to the teenage fan, providing him with everything he needed to properly represent what they created.

Unlike the fictional park, which was only previewed to six selected guests, “Jurassic Park: England” opened to 40 and was met with critical acclaim for such a humble attraction. People gasped with delight as they were towed through the torch lit river and amazed as they came face to face with simulated dangers waiting along the banks. Simpson went on to be featured in countless news outlets including radio, tv, magazines and newspapers. In addition his site showcasing the ride briefly went viral with thanks from an avid community of fans.

 

What happened to “JP:UK?” Well truth be told, nobody really knows.  In a time before social media as we know it today, it was easy for it all to fall into obscurity. The last time anyone heard from Simpson was in 2008 when he last updated his webpage. Perhaps somewhere in a British suburb, in an overgrown garden adorned with plastic skulls are the ancient ruins of this once proud attraction. A real lost world, waiting to be rediscovered, to be explored and maybe even entertain guests once again.

It’s hard to think that anything this huge could be forgotten, but if it’s one thing dinosaurs like the ones in Jurassic Park have to teach us, it’s this: Even the biggest things can be lost to time and reclaimed by the Earth. That’s why it’s important that we make our mark and tell the world who we are. The dreamers, the innovators, the people who do the impossible, keep pushing forward, shine bright and leave your legacy.

This article was written with love and with cooperation from “Big Razzie” and “Jurassic Outpost”.

Sam Neill Suggests Moving ‘Jurassic World: Dominion’ Production Down Under Amid Pandemic Delays

Legendary actor Sam Neill, who will be returning as famous paleontologist Alan Grant in Jurassic World Dominion, has floated the idea of moving production to Australia or New Zealand to get things back up and running sooner. In an interview with an Australian radio show (Fitzy and Wippa on Nova), Neill revealed Dominion had finished two weeks of shooting before the coronavirus pandemic halted filming. As he put it, the cast and crew are “in the fridge now” waiting for production to resume.

Neill said he was supposed to be filming his parts for the movie in London, firstly at Pinewood Studios, but flew home to New Zealand as soon as things started shutting down. Not wanting to stay down for long, he remarked, “I’d like to think that maybe we can start or restart in this part of the world.” With the tenuous situation in the UK at the moment, Neill “reckons New Zealand or Australia would be the place to bring it” so filming could start back up sooner.

A move down under for Jurassic World Dominion would shake up production quite a bit for the movie. I think one thing is clear, Jurassic World Dominion should not be rushed. Fans want a good movie, not one that rushes to theaters as quickly as possible. Especially in a time where movies have been delayed for months, a move like that from Universal would simply come off as a cheap cash grab ploy.

Dominion was shut-down mid production, halting the sculpting and designing of dinosaurs, creations of animatronics, and creation of complex props and sets. Dominion was shaping up to feature the most animatronic dinosaurs, both large and small, since the original Jurassic Park films, innovating much like the modern Star Wars films. However, should the production move shops, and the release date be adhered to, these will inevitably be sacrificed to save time and money. This extends to more than animatronics, but the entire artistic vision of the film, putting undue strain on Colin Trevorrow and the actors to speed through the production, and it to be more VFX dependent with far less time.

The other issue is simply one of safety. We know that when movie productions start back up, there’s going to be a lot of safety regulations put into place. We have already seen some of the restrictions the UK is planning on using, and they are STRICT. To the point of having actors six feet apart during scenes, with something as simple as a kiss requiring VFX. These restrictions expand to the crew, meaning things must move far slower, with fewer people, and costing more money. Obviously for a franchise with as much ‘chaos’ as Jurassic, requiring intense filming scenes on both sides of the camera, that probably just will not work. Of course we want this movie to be made, but not so much to the point as we are sacrificing the health and well-being of those working on it – nor the artistic vision of the movie itself. It would be much better to resume work on Dominion once we are cleared to go about business as usual, and of course, with a delayed release date.

Waiting to resume back in London has its benefits too. With all this time Colin and crew have time on their hands to think about the story they are telling and how to make it even better. Scripts constantly change in this business, and sometimes for the better – time is not going to hurt this production, but rushing will. Not to mention that if production is moved to Australia, countless employees who expected to have steady work with Dominion will be out of a job (“Don’t you mean extinct?”). It would not be fair to the people livelihood that depending on this large production, and would only disrupt or perhaps throwaway the hardwork they already put into the films development.

Of course, there may be ways to pick up some side work in Australia and New Zealand, paving the way for a full throttle return to London – but a this point it’s hard to see its longterm benefits, at least without a formal delay and proper plan.

All in all, it’s a better idea just to let things sit for the moment. Give the production some time to breathe as the pandemic subsides – it will benefit so many people in the long run. I know we are all chomping at the bit to see this star-studded Jurassic conclusion, but let’s just remember that this virus requires are absence to die out, not our presence. And if we could only step aside, and trust in nature (plus our health care professionals), Dominion will find a way.

Any thoughts on how COVID19 is affecting movie production? Do you think moving to Australia or New Zealand would actually be a good move for Dominion? Let us know in the comments below!

Source: Nova

An Update About ‘Jurassic World’ Productions and Note to Fans Amidst Current Circumstances

We’re living in unique, uneasy, uncertain, and unprecedented times.

Due to the global spread of COVID-19, better known as the ‘Coronavirus’, and the widespread public safety precautions being enacted across the globe, most industries have ground to a halt. While we know it can be frustrating to know delays are looming on the horizon, it’s important to remember how crucial it is to put the health and safety of others first. ‘Jurassic World: Dominion’ has halted filming, and will likely see a delay as the global pandemic continues to be an issue, ‘Jurassic World: Live Tour’ has been formally shutdown and cancelled, and the fate of ‘Camp Cretaceous’ remains unknown as DreamWorks has shifted to work from home.

In these times of social distancing, it’s easy to feel isolated – and it’s up to us find new ways to entertain, support, and interact as the world experiences this together. In that sense, we’ve all never been closer together. Be safe, help flatten that curve, stream more Netflix than ever before, and turn to the Jurassic community online if you’re looking for a distraction. We’ll be here.

To accompany this, we’ve decided to to publish director Colin Trevorrow’s note to the ‘Dominion’ crew – his words not only apply to those working on the film, but to the fans in the community. Read his words below, and stay safe out there.


Crew,

I know most of us were together Friday night when the news broke, but now that we’ve all had a chance to process, a quick note.

One of the things I’ve found to be true, time and again, is that opportunities can be found in the worst of news. Sometimes it’s an opportunity to appreciate something you may have taken for granted. Or just to take a step back and look at the world around you and your place in it. While this is a frustrating delay—especially as we’ve started to hit a real stride together—I hope all of us take a moment to recognize how lucky we are to tell stories for a living. Especially stories with dinosaurs in them. It’s a gift.

The most invigorating surprise for me on this production so far is how strong we are together. This crew is a well-oiled machine of human ingenuity, the kind of rare army my mentors have built over decades of work together. But every part of our group matters equally—none of us are expendable or replaceable. That’s why we’re being so careful. I want to finish the game with the team I took the field with.

So take care of yourselves, be vigilant. Value this time with your partners and children. Call your parents. We’re making a film about the need for all living things to take care of each other, with our own survival in the balance. It’s a message that matters.

Thank you again for your brilliant work so far. We’ll finish the job together soon.

ct

Jurassic World and Soft-Canon: a Counteractive and Convoluted Conundrum

This article is a guest contribution by Thomas Fishenden.

When it comes to the Jurassic Park franchise, it is safe to say that there has been a lot of world building over the duration of the five installments which Universal Studios have produced. It is certainly safe to say that a lot has been added to the franchise over the years. The films have added new locations and new animals and characters, whilst the secondary materials – such as the viral marketing – have aimed to add in more continuity between the sequel installments. Canon, however, has not always been maintained – and there have always been issues which have plagued the Jurassic franchise and the continuity it shares between its various outings. We have seen Universal and Colin Trevorrow take steps towards addressing these issues in recent years – but unfortunately, a recent announcement during the press for Jurassic World: The Live Tour has us concerned about the future canonical consistencies within the franchise.

In the past, Colin Trevorrow has stated that he is the overseer of the franchise – and would oversee issues, such as Canon, moving forwards to ensure better continuity and cohesion across the property in the future. This had many of us excited, as it seemed to indicate that both Colin and the studio behind him were willing to take meaningful steps towards building a much more coherent cinematic universe. Indeed, it appeared that the Jurassic franchise would take a similar approach to other great franchises like Star Wars and Marvel, building outwards with meaningful connections to the very core pillars which first established the franchise. For a while, this seemed to hold true – with inconsistencies around the geography of the Isla Nublar report in both Jurassic World and Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom openly addressed by the director, who proceeded to work with the team behind the viral marketing and surrounding canonical materials (Chaos Theorem) to build a meaningful explanation which alleviated the canon-breaking implications that the change in island geography had. Furthermore, the team working behind the scenes had the opportunity to build upon the background of the franchise – adding in new implications for the canon which alleviated some of the strained connections that the narratives of the more recent films had. It is safe to say that the Dinosaur Protection Group website, and other subsequent ventures, did a lot to build upon the canon in meaningful ways – addressing the concerns of long term fans and creating much more of a cinematic ‘universe’ than we had ever seen for the franchise before.

Whilst the Dinosaur Protection Group faded into obscurity after the cinematic debut of Fallen Kingdom, it appeared canon would continue to grow and expand within the franchise. This brings us to Jurassic World: The Live Tour. Press Events for the tour (see Chris’s coverage from an event in April of this year) got fans excited – with a clear focus on developing a story which could fit within the confines of a pre-established Jurassic World narrative. Indeed, whilst some of the live show would build upon the back of the blockbuster film, showcasing the Indominus rampage on Isla Nublar, the clear majority was stated to be a brand-new story exploring a top-secret InGen Facility in Chile. The story follows Doctor Kate Walker, who was working with dinosaurs in a similar behavioral capacity to Owen Grady, and has essentially been pitched as the other half of the IBRIS project which we see on screen within Jurassic World. This, again, is a project which has always been relatively secretive on-screen, so fans were excited to be able to learn even more about this new piece of lore which was sure to build upon the fundamental ideals explored within the first Jurassic World film. Anticipation was high – and this was only exasperated further by the debut of Battle at Big Rock, which explored more new characters within the same universe, after the events of Fallen Kingdom.

Unfortunately, however, it seems that the story continuity will not last.

Fast forward to the start of November, when the Live Tour is kicking off with its worldwide premiere. Colin was interviewed by the Social Media team working on behalf of Feld Entertainment., and in an Instagram story on the official tour account, Colin was asked where the events of the show fit within the timeline of Jurassic World. His response was as follows:

“We have something we call soft canon – which is that it happens, but it also exists within its own space. You know, Feld’s writers and creators made a new and original story which exists within the context of Jurassic World and I think people are really going to love it.”

This statement is great when we consider how passionate Colin is for the franchise, and it is nice to see how excited he is about the live show – but it also poses a very real problem for the franchise moving forwards. That statement of ‘soft-canon’, and the careful phrasing of this show ‘existing within the context of Jurassic World’, has set alarm bells ringing for many fans – suggesting that the show may not be a meaningful fit within the pre-determined canon of the franchise, as was previously implied. Soft-canon itself is an alarming phrase, considering its what ‘Jurassic World Evolution’ is described as — something that is not canon at all, but adheres to the rules of the universal while carving out its alternate reality.

This becomes problematic as a universe which is built without canon in mind can very quickly crumble and implode if not handle with a degree of oversight and brand management. Disney know this all too well – and it is the reason why the Star Wars Expanded Universe is now referred to as ‘Legends’. Here, Disney told too many stories which conflicted with one another and posed potential problems for the canons of the franchise so they had to restart this from the ground up and discount any of their old stories as being non-canon unless reintroduced into modern films or properties. Whilst this soured many Star Wars fans, Disney could get away with this because of the sheer scale and scope of Star Wars and its fan-base, with many more pre-established stories already under the franchise’s belt. Jurassic, in contrast, is a relatively new and expanding franchise with a smaller fan base, and so the movements made to grow the brand really need to be considered and thoughtful to connect with audiences and build a meaningful and consistent fan base. Therefore, the term ‘soft canon’ being thrown out so early in the growth of the franchise has both I and many other Jurassic fans concerned about the future direction of the franchise.

It should also be noted that Star War’s non-canon ‘legends’ media only consists of expanded fiction that came out prior to The Force Awakens. Everything since then has been carefully cultivated to fit within the ever expanding galaxy, working with their brand team, writers, and directors as to not contradict the films, but add to them all while telling their own stories. Why Jurassic cannot do this, especially given their stable creative team, and smaller universe size, is a frustrating mystery.

Whilst I appreciate that it is hard to canonise a Live Tour (other properties like ‘Marvel Universe Live’ opted to tell entirely separate stories), I think straddling the line between canon and ‘soft canon’ is an attempt for Jurassic to have its cake and eat it too. Whilst it’s a humble attempt at developing upon the IP, I feel that it misses the mark and misses what fans have truly been clamoring for – which are stories which will have larger impacts on the overall franchise whilst enabling them to connect with these characters and these stories in much more meaningful ways. The attitude of utilizing ‘soft canon’ poses a worry for fans, as it brings into question upcoming properties like Camp Cretaceous, and where they will stand in terms of both canon and impact on the other properties within the franchise. Whilst there is certainly an argument for these being more children’s tailored properties, it is important to note that even in that regard a canonical middle ground is achievable. Take, for example, Star Wars: The Clone Wars. This property found a way to tell stories within a pre-existing universe whilst not damaging canon. In fact, Clone Wars could build upon the pre-established in interesting and meaningful ways – connecting with both older and younger fans alike. This was due not only to the creative vision of Dave Filoni, but also due to the creative oversight and brand consistency which Disney and the Star Wars team had in place – and something which Jurassic seems to be sorely missing at this moment in time.

For the Jurassic World Live Tour, the format itself doesn’t entirely mesh with real world antics – so we understand that the action and context that which the story plays out may not be 1:1 to canon. But there is no reasons the overarching story itself of Dr. Kate Walker, InGens facility in Chile, and the events that subsequently played out cannot be canon. A simple “The story is canon, the action within and execution of it is soft canon” would be far more understandable. It was stated numerous times that Colin Trevorrow was involved from the start to make sure the story is hard canon. So what happened?

Make no mistake – I, and many others, are excited for new stories to be explored within the Jurassic universe. Many of us have clamoured for more from this brand for years, so the fact that we are finally getting this is exciting, and is a true testament to the creative passion of individuals like Colin Trevorrow. But, with that said, oversight is important too – and it’s important that this is built into a brand with solid foundations so that these stories can continue to be told for years to come. With that in mind, an organisation like Chaos Theorem or someone else altogether really need to be empowered to get more involved in the day-to-day canon of this universe, so that we can finally have something which feels cohesive. Continuity has always been a matter of discussion for Jurassic – and in some ways, poor continuity adds to the charm of these films. But, if Jurassic is to ever grow into a franchise with the power to do more than beat back other big names at the box office, then it is crucial that canon is considered, and that the time is taken to build a rich universe for these stories to take place within.

What do you all think? Where do you stand on canon in cinema, and is it important to you that these side projects tie in? Sound of in the comments below!


Uniting the Franchise: How Jurassic World 3 Should Incorporate Dinosaur Designs from ‘Park’ Films

Art by Neemz.

2021 is swiftly approaching. Jurassic World 3 is already shaping up to be an event unlike anything we have seen since the original Jurassic Park. With Sam Neill, Laura Dern, and Jeff Goldblum all returning for major roles in the upcoming film, it is easy to see that we are in store for a movie with some serious callbacks to the film that started it all. With the return of old human characters, Jurassic World 3 is posed in the perfect position to be a film that showcases the original aspects of Jurassic Park side by side with the new ideas put forth in the Jurassic World movies. We can talk about the human characters until the sun goes down, but at the end of the day, the highlight of Jurassic has always been the dinosaurs.

One complaint that we see time and time again is how different some of the dinosaurs look in the newer films. While some fans view these differences as a major drawback, it’s time to take a hard look at how these perceived differences actually present a unique opportunity to showcase exactly what these dinosaurs are: genetically engineered, theme park…creatures. In other words, these dinosaurs are simply lab-created animals melding natural science and science fiction.

So today, let’s take a look at some specific examples of these differences. Let’s start with a classic: the mighty Stegosaurus. We first got a glimpse at the creature on Isla Sorna in The Lost World Jurassic Park. This Jurassic Park era Stego was on the more athletic side. As you can see below, it featured a straight tail and narrow head, which featured a beak of some sort. Its athleticism was put on full display when it sensed a threat in Sarah Harding approaching its infant.

Now, let us compare that to the Jurassic World era Stegosaurus. The new creation featured a heavier retro build, with a drooping tail and a wider head (with lips instead of a beak). Their coloration is slightly different, and their skin texture is entirely different than their park counterparts. We’re first introduced to them roaming Nublar’s Gyrosphere Valley in Jurassic World, presumably engineered under Masrani’s supervision to achieve certain goals.

In a universe where scientists have been cloning and creating new dinosaurs for over twenty five years, these differences can be explained by genetic manipulation. Perhaps the old Stegosauruses were just too agile and destructive with their more athletic build and size. Maybe the Jurassic World scientists realized a beefier build appealed to the parks older demographs who imagine dinosaurs with more outdated views. Questions like these are exactly the kind of lore I believe are ripe for answering in Jurassic World 3. Before we move on to how exactly the movie can present those answers in a natural way, let’s take a look at another dinosaur example.

The Ankylosaurus is well-known for the armor plating all along its back, but the different eras of Jurassic took the animal in otherwise different directions. We first see the Jurassic Park era Anyklosaur in Jurassic Park 3 as it lumbers underneath the tree some of our characters are hiding out in. It touts rougher scale-based armor with a smaller, colorful head. It has a narrow and angular build overall and is not overtly large.

Once again, let’s look at the Jurassic World edition Ankylosaurus that we see duke it out with the Indominous Rex. Not only is the Jurassic World era animal bigger, it has defined armor plating and a larger, uniform-color head. Just like the Stegosaurus, it sports a bulkier, stockier build overall. It’s been theorized that ‘World’s’ Anylosaurs are female counterparts to ‘Park’s’ males.

Ankylosaurs and Stegosaurs are only scratching the surface. Numerous other species have distinct sub-species within the Jurassic films, with 3 different Pteranodon breeds, over 3 different breeds of Velociraptors, plus a variety of sexual dimorphism seen within Parasaurs, Brachiosaurs, and more.

The best step for Jurassic to take is to embrace the differences and use them as a tool to enrich the deep mythology the universe has already given to us. I mean, who wouldn’t want to see the Jurassic Park 3 raptors running around Blue? That sort of variety in appearance is a treasure trove of rich story that has largely only been explored by the DPG marketing campaign for Jurassic World Fallen Kingdom. It’s important to not stifle that variety, but embrace it fully, and bring all these elements from various films together.

However, not every difference is a canonical variation – the T. rex of Jurassic World being a prime example. Many fans have complained she looks off from her Jurassic Park appearance – and it’s true – the design has changed in more ways than just aging. This love for Jurassic Park’s iconic designs is another prime reason to bring them back. Not just nostalgia – they’re some of the most iconic creature designs in cinema. Embrace the masterclass work of Stan Winston Studios, Crash McCreery and ILM that laid the foundation for Jurassic World.

We know that Jurassic World 3 director Colin Trevorrow plans to expand the universe even more and deal with these creatures on a much larger scale now that they’re part of our world. One of the best ways to explore this evolution naturally, while keeping it tied to the past films is to simply go back to the older, forgotten dinosaurs. Likewise, we can finally explore how these various subspecies may interact – what would a crossbreed of a Jurassic Park female raptor and JP3 male raptor look like? Or would they never have the chance, fighting for territory instead?

What makes the Jurassic Park novel so great is that it tackles the science aspect of the story head on – the novel version of Wu has candid conversations with Hammond about manipulating the DNA of the dinosaurs to alter their physical characteristics and change the way they behave. If we’re trying to find inspiration, that’s where to start the search. Having a character in the movie, like Wu, explain the differences between all the animals on screen only serves to deepen the canon in a positive way. Not only that, it serves as a natural explanation for why Project IBRIS with the raptors at Jurassic World was (eventually) successful compared to the more aggressive raptors from the previous movies.

What are your thoughts on the dinosaur differences? Is this a purposeful creation from Jurassic Park scientists, or do you think the filmmakers were just looking to switch up the styles? If you believe the science backs it up, would you like to see it explained on screen? Sound off in the comments below and tell us how you would explain the uniqueness of the dinosaurs!

Opinion: It’s Time We Get Some Answers About Jurassic World’s ‘Battle at Big Rock’ Short Film

This article is a guest contribution by Thomas Fishenden.

February has come to be an exciting time for Jurassic World fans – with New York Toy Fair usually leading to the reveal of a plethora of Jurassic merchandise which fans of the franchise will have the opportunity to sink their teeth into over the coming year. This year’s Toy Fair brought more with it than usual, however, with Mattel’s sales reps giving us a tantalization tease in the form of a secret which they weren’t meant to let slip on the show floor. According to them, fans of their toyline could look forward to both a Nasutoceratops and a brand-new Allosaurus joining their line, modeled on an upcoming live action short film which was set to debut before Universal’s ‘Hobbs and Shaw’ – the next instalment in their popular Fast and Furious franchise.

During May, two brand-new dual attack figures from Mattel hit store shelves, featuring new branding which called out this short in the form of a small graphics stating that these characters were ‘As seen in Battle at Big Rock’. But, more than two weeks after the release of Hobbs & Shaw, this highly anticipated short film is still nowhere to be seen.

The absence didn’t come as a massive surprise to Outpost. It was already heard that there had been a little bit of trouble over the experimental films budget, which had reportedly exceeded the ten-million-dollar threshold. With such a high-cost for what was to be a smaller story, it appears the studio decided late in the game that they had wanted a more traditional content delivery method. This is most likely a step to try and turn a profit on the project, given the large cost which ended up being attached to it.

However, all this silence and behind the scenes uncertainty has led to a growth of pessimism within the online community. Rather than build excitement and anticipation, many Jurassic fans are now worried whether this project will ever see the light of day.

Despite several toys with ‘Battle at Big Rock’ branding already being available for several months now, Universal Pictures have still yet to acknowledge that this short film even exists. This radio silence from the studio has, understandably, got many members of the fan base worried about the direction this project may take. You may remember that, recently, we debuted some storyboards from a scrapped Jurassic Park: The Lost World animated show, which never saw the light of day. It is safe to say that cancelled projects like this, combined with a track record of production troubles for the Jurassic franchise have led to many fans becoming used to exciting new projects suddenly disappearing from the Universal release calendar. Even more troubling than this is the fact that Walmart (who have had a solid track-record with carrying Mattel products) have now decided to drop the ‘Dual Attack’ line altogether – suggesting that this may be a move to remove the Allosaurus and Nasutoceratops from shelves altogether. It strikes us as bizarre that, even before the project’s release, Universal seem to be taking steps to kill the tie-in synergy which they pushed for the short.

Whether Big Rock was intended to debut as a secret project or not, it is safe to say that Jurassic fans now know this project exists. Continuing to maintain a degree of secrecy when products from the short are already available seems to be a gross misjudgement of the community, and one which we hoped is rectified sooner rather than later. We’re hopeful that the powers that be will hear the concerns of the fanbase, and will let us know that this Battle is far from over. There are still many more adventures to explore in a Jurassic World.

Update


The Dinosaurs of Jurassic World Are Both Male and Female, and They’re Breeding

When John Hammond dreamed up the idea of Jurassic Park in the later years of the 20th century, he thought he had control of the future. “We control their chromosomes, it’s really not that difficult,” Dr. Henry Wu (Hammond’s ‘Chief Geneticist’), proudly proclaimed, going on to mock Dr. Malcolm “You’re implying that a group comprised entirely of females will…breed?” Little did he or John Hammond know what lack of control they truly had on this expansive and ultimately impossible idea. Sure, Jurassic World boasted roughly 10 years of control over these animals – but – “You never had control. That’s the illusion.”

In the beginning of the franchise, we’re told that all the dinosaurs in Jurassic Park are female. This is because, as Wu says, “all vertebrate embryos are inherently female, anyway. They just require an extra hormone given at the right developmental stage to make them male. We simply deny them that.”, ultimately displaying the ignorance and arrogance Jurassic Park is showcasing. Hammond and his team of scientists were trying to force nature into what would end up being a very unnatural state. “Life finds a way,” as Dr. Malcolm puts it, nature fights back, and he is proven correct.

As you know, later in the film, Dr. Grant and the kids come across velociraptor eggs. Eggs mean reproduction. In vertebrate species, reproduction typically means males and females (though in certain scenarios with some vertebrates asexual reproduction is possible). However, as we discovered that from the very start, there always have been both males and females in Jurassic Park, though they’re not always distinguishable via sexual dimorphism. The Lost World confirms the dinosaurs are reproducing sexually, distinguishing the sexes of the animals with the Tyrannosaurs and Velociraptors. We’re introduced to the fact that male Tyrannosaurs are green, while the females are brown – further, male Velociraptors are brighter orange with distinct tiger-like stripes. Later, in Jurassic Park III we’re introduced to new raptors, where the males have a stripe running down the sides of their back (a feature later reflected in Velociraptor Blue) and feather-like quills. The females are more white in appearance. (This makes sense because – no offense ladies – in nature, males are usually more vibrant, like cardinals for example. This is because the females are usually the ones doing the hunting and protection of their young, and so for these reasons, they need to be more dull in color and blend in better to their surroundings.)

So what’s the deal with the dinos in Jurassic World? While Jurassic World established that the Raptors, Mosasaur and Indominus are female, we do know that there were also males, and controlled breeding, like in today’s zoos. This tweet from writer/director Colin Trevorrow himself spells it out:

This information from Colin Trevorrow confirms that between Jurassic World and Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom, the animals were breeding on Isla Nublar. In Fallen Kingdom, there’s an Allosaurus that is literally called a “juvenile” Allosaurus, and you can also see various baby Triceratops several times. If you’re reading this and thinking you were the only one who thought that the animals were all female, don’t worry, you are not alone. Strangely, numerous instances of licensed material for the franchise have stated that all Jurassic World dinosaurs are female. Mattel has referred to the male “buck” rex as female, for instance, while ‘Jurassic World: The Evolution of Claire’ has also claimed all animals to be female. (Side bar: I’d love to see male and female distinction in the games, and even a “controlled breeding” element. This could be risky territory – I just want to see baby dinos, can you blame me!?)

This makes the ending of Fallen Kingdom all the more significant: now that the animals are on the mainland, they will continue to breed. There obviously aren’t multiple rexes or raptors released from Lockwoods estate, so their reproductive options are limited. However, there were multiple ankylosaurs, ceratopsians, theropods, sauropods, and others released into North America that will certainly have the chance to reproduce naturally.

I am interested to see how the animals will repopulate in the Americas as invasive species, if that is something that Colin Trevorrow decides to explore. The key for combatting this invasive species threat will be response time to their capture. Compies would likely be impossible to locate and capture – there could be thousands running around after a few years. Conversely, some of the larger animals will be easier to isolate and capture with the help of the technological forces of the 21st century. With the amount of animals that were released from Lockwood’s estate, there certainly had to be a few males and females of most of the species and they will have the ability, if given the opportunity, to breed. After all, they’ve always been male and female, and breeding – ever since 1993.

If you ever forget that, just remember the words from Owen. “They’re thinkin’ I gotta eat…I gotta hunt…I gotta…”

Mattel Jurassic World Destroy ‘N Devour Indominus Rex Review

Hold on to your butts – we have an asset out of containment! Courtesy of our friends at Entertainment Earth, we have the brand new 2019 Mattel Dino Rivals Destroy N Devour Indominus Rex in hand for an unboxing and review! This all new action figure lives up to its name, and is one of the coolest dinosaur toys out there.

Check out the video below:

Relive the terror! Be a part of the Jurassic World adventure with the ultimate in dinosaur battle action! An abomination hybrid of the Velociraptor,Giganotosaurus, Rugops, Majungasaurus, and Carnotaurus, the Indominus Rex is one of the most terrifying and deadliest dinosaur ever masterminded. Inspired by the film, this larger-sized dinosaur wreaks havoc and fear everywhere! Ominous features include realistic scales, longer arms with dagger-like claws, and push button activation. To activate, move the back button to operate the mouth and activate sound effects;also use the button to make Indominus bend down, pick up and swallow human figures. The mouth opens wide to swallow 3-inch figures in its throat. An LED light in the throat lights up to show the human figure! WOW! Now get the slashing action going by pushing the front button for arm strikes and slashing sound effects. Act out ferocious battle scenes with Indominus and relive all the exciting adventure and terror of the movie! Requires batteries: 3x “AG13” (included).

Mattel has truly knocked it out of the park with the Destroy N Devour Indomoninus Rex, far surpassing the 2015 release by Hasbro, and it stands tall with the Jurassic Park Kenner classics. Every scale, quill, and tooth is beautifully sculpted, making this one of the most detailed dinosaur toys out there. Whether it’s kids for playing, or collectors for displaying, everyone will be thrilled by this terrifyingly fun and large toy.

Huge thanks to Entertainment Earth for sending this toy along so quickly so we could feature a review! The Mattel Indominus Rex is expected to ship this month from Entertainment Earth, which means they will be one of the first places you can pick up the toy – before brick and mortar stores carry it. If you’re new to Entertainment Earth, they have a mint condition guarantee, a low price guarantee, and hassle free 90-day returns. You can still Pre-order the Destroy N Devour Indominus Rex here!

Entertainment Earths entire Jurassic collection of toys and other items can also be found here.

Even more new toys from Mattel will be shipping soon, including toys such as the Mega Dual Attack Quetzalcoatlus and Amargasaurus – so stay tuned! This line of toys continues to evolve and explore more exotic species and play patterns, truly living up to the Jurassic name. Toys find a way.

Sound off in the comments below, and let us know if you will be picking up the Destroy N Devour Indominus Rex, and tell us what toys you would like to see from Mattel in the future! Also, be sure to like the video, and subscribe to our YouTube channel for even more content!