‘Jurassic World: Dominion’ Game ‘Primal Ops’ Releases on IOS!

The Jurassic World: Dominion game ‘Primal Ops’ has just been released in a limited fashion for iOS! The game features real-time Jurassic World action-combat gameplay, strategic dinosaur companions, challenging missions, dinosaur rescues, and a “create your own” play style with epic power-ups hidden in each mission. Read our previous coverage of this game here.

Watch the first gameplay trailer below:


‘Primal Ops’ contains some fun gameplay options and missions, which are detailed in the App Store description:

The action-adventure mobile game of the Jurassic World universe.

Jurassic World Primal Ops is a thrilling top-down action-adventure game where only you can save the dinosaurs from another extinction. As an elite battle-trained dinosaur handler, your mission is to travel across North America, rescuing dinosaurs from malicious mercenaries, formidable poachers, and sinister scientists.

Luckily, you’re not alone. The dinosaurs you rescue from your Dinosaur Collection are companions capable of turning the tide in any battle. Each dinosaur added to your roster can be called on to fight by your side, using their unique abilities to powerful effect. Build lasting bonds with your favorite dinosaurs and overcome any challenge standing in your way.

A PRIMAL WORLD

Life as we know it has changed. Dinosaurs freely roam the Earth once again. Expand on the story of Jurassic World with a thrilling new narrative adventure featuring an expansive cast of allies, foes, and a huge primal world to discover.

SEARCH & RESCUE

Dinosaurs are no longer extinct, but many stand determined to keep them endangered. It’s up to you to infiltrate enemy camps, gain intel, and rescue wild, captured, or wounded dinosaurs from three villainous factions.

BUILD YOUR DINOSAUR COLLECTION

Every rescued dinosaur will be added to your Dinosaur Collection and made available as an ally. There are dozens of dinosaurs to collect, each with unique abilities to aid you on your mission.

BATTLE TOGETHER

Nothing levels a playing field like a T.rex. From trampling Triceratops to supply-dropping Pteranodons, use the unique abilities of your dinosaur companions to overcome challenges in combat, with each one bringing a new dynamic to the battlefield.

EXPLORE & UPGRADE

Explore North America seeking out dinosaur eggs, DNA strands, and the many secrets hidden throughout its landscapes. Use these collectibles to level up and strengthen your dinosaur companions, furthering your bond and unlocking new abilities. Jurassic World Primal Ops is available in English.

Official Licensed Product. Jurassic World Primal Ops © 2022 Universal City Studios LLC and Amblin Entertainment, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Game developed by Behaviour Interactive Inc.


While this mobile game is currently a soft release, only available in a few countries, and interestingly without an official announcement or website, it’s exciting that it’s making its way into the world.

What do you think about this game, and will you be playing? Let us know in the comments and stay tuned to Jurassic Outpost for the latest news!

Jurassic World Evolution 2 Review

The Park is Open – again

It’s been over 3 years since the original Jurassic World Evolution released on consoles and PC, and the anticipated sequel delivers on the promise of Fallen Kingdom: we’re not on an island anymore (except when we are, but more on that later).

Jurassic World Evolution 2 offers some new updates to the established gameplay from the first title, but will also be immediately familiar to players of the first – perhaps too familiar at times. However, for those unfamiliar with Evolution, it is a park building and management game where you’re tasked with creating your very own Jurassic worlds.

The core gameplay loop in Jurassic World Evolution 2 is all about building park attractions with key operation and exhibition facilities, seeing to guest and animal comfort, all while making sure you remain profitable and don’t run out of money. As you may expect, things don’t always go to plan, and chaos will come into play – from natural disasters like tornadoes and blizzards, dinosaurs growing distressed by their health and needs, and occasionally, dinosaurs breaking free and eating your guests (which is a very quick way to run out of funds).

You can help avoid unhappy dinosaurs trying to escape by making sure you’ve crafted an enclosure meeting their environmental needs, such as making sure you’ve grown the correct prehistoric flora for herbivores to feed upon, have enough water, open space, and other factors such as making sure species cohabitating a particular enclosure actually like one another.

If your dinosaurs break free you’ll need to send in ranger teams to round up the ramping threats before they cause too much mayhem, so it’s important to have them placed close by. While this may be easy in the early stages of your park, it becomes more of a challenge as your park grows and is something that will greatly affect your ability to mitigate the collapse of your park – especially as some maps are quite restrictive in size (but fret not, others are quite large).

Likewise, you’ll want to make sure you’ve researched the best facilities to contain and care for your dinos – such as the new medical center for taking care of sick and injured dinosaurs. As sick dinosaurs can die or spread illness, you’ll want to make sure your mobile veterinary teams can access the species as quickly as possible.

Research is integral to keeping your park well managed and profitable, and will also provide you the means to train your scientists whomst are integral to the core game mechanics. Scientists are hired staff required to be assigned to all management tasks such as aforementioned research, expeditions for fossils and dinosaurs, DNA synthesis, and egg incubation. 

Each scientist has three skill categories with associated levels: logistics, genetics, and welfare. The various management tasks, such as sending out a team to look for fossils, have required skills in the category or categories, therefore making sure your various staff are properly leveraged for the tasks ahead is crucial. Likewise, each scientist has a specific perk. Some simply have a higher stamina rate, meaning you can assign them more tasks in a row without them needing a break from overworking, while others may allow for things such as 50% cheaper DNA synthesis or 30% faster egg incubation. You’ll have to make hard choices to make sure you’re saving as much money and time as possible while having enough skill points for the tasks your park requires, and this staff system brings a lot of strategy into the game.

As I mentioned before, the staff can get overworked and require rest. If you’re not careful, the scientists may become disgruntled, causing setbacks in your park such as sabotage. These new functionalities make the gameplay more dynamic as you expand your park, requiring more strategy in your choices as opposed to only arbitrary wait times while tasks complete.

The way you edit the environment is far more dynamic than the first game. For example, herbivores no longer have feeders and rather require the proper plant life to support their diets. While some may feed off of ground fiber and nuts, others will feed off tall leaves. With limited space in each paddock for what you can grow, you need to be mindful about the species you place together so their dietary and general comfort needs (which include things like open space, the amount of rocks, and more) can sync up.

Then, of course, there are the park guests – the people you want to keep happy to fund your dino-park escapades. Their comfort in the park boils down to amenities such as food, shopping, and restrooms, the placement of emergency bunkers, transportation, and of course attractions. Your star attractions are the dinosaurs, and you want to make sure you have the other desired amenities in close proximity to them. Viewing galleries are a primary way for guests to see dinosaurs, and the placement of the galleries is key to make sure the guests actually have sight-lines on the various species. Guests also don’t like to travel too much by foot, so researching and placing structures such as hotels and monorail stations around your focal dino-hubs really helps maximize the success of your park.

Each level features different environmental locations with different sizes and shapes, sometimes including narrow choke points where building and movement will be restricted. Making smart use of that space to fit all the needed structures, pathways, and dinosaur paddocks is crucial. If you’re not careful, you can easily build yourself into a corner where the needed facilities cannot fit. This will affect profit, guest comfort, and your ability to properly care for the dinosaurs – this can become even worse if disaster strikes.

Another great feature is the ability to pause time and assess a situation while assigning tasks within the park or choosing building placements. When a park is large, a lot can happen at once, and this feature allows you to manage many occurrences simultaneously before resuming the action and letting your choices play out. Likewise, you can speed up time by 2 and 3 times, allowing for tasks to complete in a blink of an eye. Be careful though – if things start going wrong, every second counts.

While many of these elements existed in the first Jurassic World Evolution, there are many small quality of life adjustments across the board which make the gameplay more dynamic, and in theory, more fun.

Unlike the first game, Evolution 2 offers 4 different modes of play: Campaign, Chaos Theory, Challenge Mode, and Sandbox.

Campaign mode picks up after the events of Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom, with dinosaurs now free in the mainland across various wilds in the US and elsewhere. The story picks up with Owen Grady and Claire Dearing now employed by the United States Department of Fish and Wildlife (DFW) working to help humans and dinosaurs successfully co-exist. The United States Government is concerned by the potential threat dinosaurs pose, and have set up many departments to help keep a close eye on the dinos. These include the DFW and another key player: the newly formed Dangerous Species Division (DSD) of the CIA. While the DFW and DSD cooperate together, there is some tension and distrust between the government agencies, particularly as the CIA isn’t the most forthcoming about their activities with dinosaurs outside of those the DFW directly assist with.

The single player mode marks the largest departure from Jurassic World Evolution and frankly even Evolution 2’s core gameplay mechanics. Rather than building parks, worrying about guest comfort, and profits, you’re simply tasked with tracking down nuisance dinosaurs and containing, observing, and relocating them – just as normal, non-prehistoric nuisance animals are often dealt with.

As such, the levels are divided into distinct playspaces within each map: the “buildable area” for creating and maintaining the DFW’s facilities and the “wild area”. The wild area consists of large expanses of wilderness where you cannot build but can take direct control of ranger teams to drive and fly across, tracking down dinosaurs, capturing them, and bringing them back to your containment facility that you build. Primarily you will build simple operation facilities such as paleo veterinary centers, paddocks, and observation platforms for the DFW to study the dinosaurs. Essentially, you want to make sure you have the right size paddock with the right terrain inside for the dinosaurs’ comfort, and once you’ve done that, you’ve got nothing else to worry about.

As such, you wont utilize most of the game’s core gameplay features and building options in the single player which, quite frankly, is a bizarre choice in a park building and management game. In fact, the the entire single player feels like a short, snappy narrative driven tutorial for a larger game that Frontier forgot to include. The story ends abruptly, only running a few hours, with a narrative that feels like it’s just setting up the first act. While the campaign of the first Jurassic World Evolution admittedly could drag, it was much larger and felt more content complete. The sequel’s main story can be beat faster than it takes to achieve a 5-star rating on some of the challenge mode locations.

It truly feels like rather than adjust the story to account for the fact that Jurassic World Dominion was delayed, they kept the initial set up and cut the rest of campaign that would intersect too closely with the upcoming film. The story makes mention of a third party and unknown location (seemingly alluding to BioSyn), and it seems like things are just getting ready to explore that thread when the credits role unceremoniously.

If you’re a player more interested in the narrative single player campaign be warned: campaign feels more like a small expansion to the first game rather than a standalone sequel experience. While the new environments are gorgeous, you won’t spend much time in them within the context of campaign. Some levels, such as Pennsylvania’s beautiful Appalachians, aren’t even featured in the various sandbox and challenge modes.

Chaos Theory mode feels like a secondary campaign, only smaller in story scope. It does offer some expanded narrative “what if” situations which are introduced with absolutely stunning intro cut-scenes narrated by Jeff Goldblum, reprising his role of Ian Malcolm (though he sometimes sounds less like Malcolm and goes into his weird and whimsical Goldblum voice). Each level is its own standalone story with simple premises attributed to the five films: build and open Jurassic Park successfully for the first film, Build and open Jurassic Park San Diego successfully for The Lost World, Create Jurassic World and successfully remain open with the Indominus Rex for the fourth movie. However, all of those quickly become repetitive gameplay with less narrative threads as your task is simply to achieve a 5-star rating with certain arbitrary chore-like challenges thrown at you along the way. This mode is hit and miss, particularly as it limits player freedom and can quickly become a little too chaotic if you make one wrong move. Personally, I found the San Diego level to be more engaging than the other two which just felt like they dragged on too long. I’m pretty sure I spent more time on Jurassic World’s Chaos Theory level than I did the main campaign – most of my star dinosaurs dying of old age before I cleared the level.

The issue in Chaos Theory mode is that it mostly assumes you understand the intricacies of park building and management. While it does introduce you to some basics, they’re not enough to realize the long road you have ahead to reach 5-stars. The mode may have felt like less of a chore had the main campaign done more introductory legwork work to introduce the player to the expanded core park management mechanics, but as it stands, the average player may find the experience overwhelming. Spending hours on a simple ‘what if’ scenario shouldn’t be a trial by fire to learn the games core mechanics – because if you make too many mistakes, you may be forced to start from scratch.

Jurassic Park 3 and Fallen Kingdom’s Chaos Theory modes shake up the formula, and while the other three levels may last too long, these two feel too short. Fallen Kingdom’s plot essentially boils down to returning to Nublar sans a volcanic threat, scanning a few dinosaurs, and then using the removal tool to destroy the pre-built park. It’s weird – and not fun.

Jurassic Park 3 stands out, as it seems to be an actual lore expansion set between the events of Jurassic Park 3 and Jurassic World rather than a “what if”, returning to Isla Sorna to capture dinosaurs and relocate them to Isla Nublar for Jurassic World. This level plays more like the single player where you capture wild dinosaurs and create basic paddocks for their comfort only. As such, it is short, but it is also a fun break with some curious lore implications.

Challenge mode is where the game really shines and seems to find better balance between pacing, mission structure, and player expression. It features entire suite of gameplay mechanics all with the goal of reaching a 5-star rating in various locations, while contending different challenge modifiers (for example, a level where dinosaurs are more prone to sickness). While this may sound similar to the Chaos Theory mode, you have more freedom and less arbitrary requirements, allowing you to build and respond to the various challenges in the way you personally wish. Likewise, this mode offers the full suite of ways to obtain dinosaurs for your park, including finding them within the map, sending expeditions to find fossils, and occasionally expeditions to capture wild dinosaurs transporting them directly to your park. It’s a shame the game’s more narrative-driven campaigns don’t embrace this wider sandbox of gameplay, as it offers a sense of freedom and diversity critically lacking in the campaign and Chaos Theory.

That said, much like the first Jurassic World Evolution, the game still lacks a sense of personal freedom to entirely craft a park as you wish with the many facilities and attractions you would come to expect from the films. While the Gyrosphere tour returns, as does a Jurassic Park and World themed vehicle tour, no new rides or dinosaur themed attractions are present – such as the river tour, Pachy arena, or T. rex kingdom. While some of these additions may seem arbitrary, the idea of this game very much revolves around building your own park – and when each park has the same limited suite of options, it quickly becomes repetitive.

This is an issue the first game suffered from, and by result, it often times felt boring when compared to other park management titles. While this game has some new additions, and thus can be more engaging, many of the changes feel more like lateral moves. This is especially because most of the buildings, features, and dinosaurs are straight out of the first game. In fact, some species featured in the first didn’t even make the cut for the sequel.

A fun albeit small addition is the ability to customize some buildings, choosing from a few presets like Jurassic Park or Jurassic World styled walls, entrances, and decorative displays – while also being allowed to customize portions of the colors and lights. While this doesn’t effect gameplay, it does give the player more forms of expression. Although most of it is hard to notice while properly playing the game in its birds eye view.

Some of the buildings you would expect to have alternative models and skins from various eras – such as the aviary or paddock fencing – sadly do not. And while you can choose skins for your vehicles, including the pre-order and deluxe addition bonuses, in sandbox mode you cannot freely choose any skin. If you want Jurassic World-themed ranger teams, you have to choose that building style for the ranger station, and vice versa for Jurassic Park, only allowing for the bonus skins to be freely swapped in. Curiously, the DFW vehicles from campaign seem to be absent.

The ability to genetically modify your dinosaur returns allows you to adjust things like their temperament, lifespan, and of course, how they look. Each species has a variety of skins – imagine them as basic color presets and patterns. You can apply a pattern to a skin to bring out more complexity, usually resulting more contrasting colors and striping. Sadly, like the first game, you cannot actually preview the skins to know what they create and there is no proper database for all the varieties of species designs in-game.

Some of the legacy dinosaur designs also appear as skins, and they also can result in model changes. These include the Tyrannosaurs with skins from all 3 Jurassic Park films, Parasaurolophus from the two sequels, Velociraptors from all three films, the Brachiosaurs from both Jurassic Park and JP3, Stegosaurs, Triceratops, and more. Some legacy species don’t have skin that directly calls out the film its from – such as Spinosaurus, Dilophosaurus or Pachycephalosaurs – yet they do have film accurate colors achievable by choosing the correct generic skin/pattern combos. Just good luck figuring that out on your first try.

While some dinosaurs are incredibly accurate and offer a fantastic look at their film counterparts, others are lacking or have issues. For instance, Jurassic Park 3 female raptors have great colors, yet sport the quills of the males. The Allosaurus retains its look from the first game, which predates Battle at Big Rock and does not reflect Fallen Kingdom either. This means it’s an entirely canon on-screen species with entirely fictional in-game design. The Pteranodons do not have their Lost World or JP3 skin/models, and sadly the Mamenchisaurus does not reflect its design from the The Lost World which was recently shown in better detail for the first time.

The aviaries are engaging and the flying reptiles can escape from them wreaking havoc on your park – however they don’t offer much in the terms of customization, theming, or shape. The species list is on the small side, but does include the Jurassic World Pteranodons and Dimorphodons. Sadly the Dimorphodons lack the fuzzy filaments called pycnofibres that they sport in the films.

The ability to build lagoons and breed marine reptiles also makes its debut, but these facilities have even fewer customizations and gameplay options.

Despite the various frustrating inaccuracies, when the game looks good, it looks fantastic. However, it’s not always firing on all cylinders in the art department or engine performance. While some levels look gorgeous, with the environments looking rich, realistic, and detailed, others have a decidedly dated and lower detailed look which effects visual readability. The same could be said for the dinosaurs. While some species are so detailed you can see each scale and bump in crisp detail up close, others look waxy with muddier textures. That said, as the game is often played at distance from the dinosaurs, the animation, lighting and environments are what really make or breaks the visual experience.

The game suffers from some noticeable draw distance pop-in, especially with shadows which just blip in and out of existence – which can be very distracting. Likewise, lighting effects turn off and on at various distances, and while that may not be obvious when hovering in one location, as you pan across your park it jumps out more and more. This is very obvious while in “capture mode” which turns off the hud and gives you more cinematic control over the camera.

I played the game on the Xbox Series X, one of the most powerful home consoles out there, and these issues were immediately obvious. While I didn’t play the game on the less powerful Xbox One or PS4, I imagine they’re even more notable. Which brings me to the other, more important point: performance.

When things really get going this game struggles, with huge frame hitches as you zoom in and out or pan over particularly complex areas. Again, I can only guess how it runs on the less powerful machines, but it feels like a certain layer of optimization and polish is missing – further illustrated by the numerous crashes I experienced while playing. Thankfully, autosave meant not much progress was lost, although I do recommend saving frequently.

The game also suffers from frequent bugs, and while most are minor and don’t impact the game some can lead to frustrating results. Sometimes dinosaurs can become stuck in place – they attempt to move, making flying or walking motions, but they go nowhere. This leads to them slowly dying from starvation and dehydration. At the very least, that can sometimes be fixed by tranquilizing the dinosaur and relocating them. However, it’s not always that easy in an aviary as you can’t exact direct control over the task. You have to let the AI do it by deploying a drone into the aviary, and guess what: the drone can become stuck. There is no easy fix for that – I found myself destroying aviary hatcheries and rebuilding them simply to allow for a new drone that hopefully doesn’t get stuck. Unfortunately this issue popped up frequently, enough to deter me from flying reptiles in the more difficult challenge modes if possible.

With so few changes from the first game, a shockingly short and simple campaign mode, and the various performance issues I can’t help but feel this game was rushed and surely could have benefited from a delay to release alongside Jurassic World Dominion – if not further out. I also have no doubt content was removed from the game due to the films delay – I suspect it will be released next June alongside the upcoming sequel – but this sadly contributes to what feels like an incomplete package.

Don’t get me wrong, the game can be fun, but much like the first it has the foundations of a decent park management simulation without the much needed finer level of control, freedom, and variety. The gameplay can be repetitive and oftentimes doesn’t feel rewarding. While the dinosaurs do have more behaviors this time, such as pack hunting, they’re essentially just pretty looking props to challenge you that you can’t really appreciate outside of sandbox mode – where you can turn off disasters, have unlimited cash, and can get up close taking your time without concern of park collapse. Even there, there’s not much to do with the dinos if you’re not interested in building environments and then using capture mode to grab cinematic footage of them. I just can’t help but feel there is some core gameplay element lacking here that would make it all more worth it.

While this game isn’t bad – it’s also not great. I suspect it will find its real home with modders and content creators, but the average player likely won’t entirely get what they’re looking for. Likewise, park management fans may find the gameplay more shallow than they’re used to. This was easier to forgive with the first Jurassic World Evolution, but it’s doubly frustrating with the sequel, which seems more interested in re-skinning the first game than offering a proper evolution and improvement. While I do believe Jurassic-fans will find something they enjoy in this game, if you don’t mind waiting a little, I recommend waiting for it to go on sale. 

I can’t imagine it will take too long.

‘Jurassic World Primal Ops’ Game Coming Soon – But What Is It?

We have some great news for Jurassic fans and gamers! Universal recently filed a trademark for the name “JURASSIC WORLD PRIMAL OPS” under the Computer & Software Products & Electrical & Scientific Products category. The description provided for this trademark says:

Downloadable interactive multi-media software for playing games; downloadable software in the nature of a mobile application for playing games and accessing entertainment content for use with computers, portable handheld digital electronic communication devices, mobile devices, wired and wireless communication devices, and video game consoles; downloadable computer game software for wireless and electronic mobile devices, mobile phones, hand-held electronic devices, and video game consoles; computer game discs; video game discs; wireless communication devices and wireless communication systems comprised of computer hardware and recorded software for the transmission of audio, voice, and images.

While the description does contain verbiage regarding computers, we believe that ‘PRIMAL OPS‘ will (sadly) most likely be a new mobile ‘Jurassic’ game. However, we do hope this will be a proper larger scope and high game hitting consoles and PC, where there is a serious lack of story-driven Jurassic experiences. While properties like Star Wars continue to excel at providing diverse and quality gaming experiences, Jurassic’s approach has leaves a lot to be desired, only really delving in park building simulation games or lower budget mobile games and VR gimmick titles.

That leaves us to wonder what kind of game this will be – based on the name, we could be getting some kind of first-person dinosaur tracking/hunting game, or maybe the long awaited survival adventure similar to ‘Alien Isolation’ and ‘Jurassic World Aftermath’ (the latter of which is seeing a story expansion September 30th). Given the story post Fallen Kingdom, we could imagine this being a game where you track down and capture escaped dinosaurs across the North American countryside – which would tie in to 2022’s Jurassic World Dominion quite nicely.

It’s worth noting that over the past couple of years, Universal Games has been running ads for mockup Jurassic World mobile games (embedded above), and if you would click the link it would take you to a survey about the concept. It’s likely that Primal Ops is the proper realization of this collection of user research, which frequently were built around top-down shooters much like The Lost World game on Sega Genesis.

The game was described as the following:

Dinosaurs roam the earth. Can your team save
them all?

Dinosaurs have been released and are running
wild. It’s up to you and your team to rescue the
dinosaurs from poachers, relocate dangerous
carnivores to safety, and train your team of
human experts and dinosaur companions as you
encounter increasingly difficult situations.

Features:

– Real-time Jurassic World action-combat gameplay

– Strategize your team upgrades and train your dinosaur companion to unlock challenging missions

– Outsmart enemies as you compete to rescue your next dinosaur

– Create your own playstyle through epic powerups hidden inside the levels in each mission

Ultimately not much is known about the game at this point, or if that mockup game and user survey were related, but be sure follow Jurassic Outpost for the latest updates!

What kind are you hoping ‘JURASSIC WORLD PRIMAL OPS’ will be? Let us know in the comments!

‘Jurassic World: Evolution 2’ Announced At Summer Game Fest – Coming in 2021!

This year’s Summer Game Fest kicked off with its virtual live stream to deliver all the exciting announcements on the future of gaming. For ‘Jurassic World’ fans, of course, the big question was: will there be another game related to the franchise? That question was answered when Jeff Goldblum himself announced Frontier’s continuation of their park-building triumph with ‘Jurassic World: Evolution 2’!

Jurassic World: Evolution‘ was released on June 2018 by Frontier Developments, and was a immersive park-building game for the PC and other consoles. With the assistance of characters from the franchise, such as Claire Dearing, Dr. Henry Wu, and Ian Malcolm; players would be tasked with creating and controlling the environments for over 50 dinosaur species. This game was a quick hit with fans, especially when a classic ‘Jurassic Park’-themed DLC hit on December 2019. Ever since that final DLC, fans had been anticipating a sequel to further their creations with new elements.

‘Jurassic World: Evolution 2’ promises not only new locales, themes, and story elements from the upcoming ‘Jurassic World: Dominion’ film but also a much needed expansion on the gameplay!

During Summer Fest, Goldblum dramatically announced the trailer, saying it will “elevate you to new heights”, “submerge you to new depths” and “challenge you to control chaos”. The trailer then played, showcasing pteranodons, brachiosaurs, coelophysis, snow-capped mountains, and a mosasaur! This marks the premiere of water-based prehistoric reptiles for the game!

The official press release explains in great detail the extent of this game’s expansion of what has come before:

“Based on Universal Pictures’ blockbuster film franchise and created in collaboration with Universal Games and Digital Platforms, Jurassic World Evolution 2 builds upon the ground-breaking and beloved 2018 dinosaur park management simulation. It offers players a thrilling front seat as they take charge of one of the greatest theme parks of all time.

With a brand new, immersive narrative campaign voiced by cast members from across the Jurassic World film franchise, exciting new features, four engaging game modes, and an enhanced and expanded roster of dinosaurs, Jurassic World Evolution 2 provides fans with everything they need to create authentic and compelling Jurassic World experiences.

Players will leave the Muertes Archipelago for the first time and build their own authentic Jurassic Worlds across diverse new environments, from dense forests to scorched deserts, in efforts to conserve and contain more than 75 prehistoric species. These include all-new flying and marine reptiles, brought to life with captivating realism. They’ll display brand new behaviours as they interact with each other, fight for dominance, and react intelligently to the world around them.

In Jurassic World Evolution 2, players dive into an original single player campaign featuring iconic film actors reprising their roles. Join Dr. Ian Malcolm (voiced by Jeff Goldblum), and Claire Dearing (voiced by Bryce Dallas Howard) in an immersive and exciting narrative experience set after the Earth-shattering events of Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom.

Chaos Theory mode is another major addition. It offers a reimagined take on pivotal moments from the Jurassic World film franchise as players strive to make their own mark and change the course of events. Elsewhere, for those looking to unleash their creativity, Sandbox mode delivers everything players need to create their perfect Park, while Challenge mode tests their mastery of the game.

Across all modes we’ve dramatically improved our signature management and construction gameplay to give players everything needed to create their ultimate Jurassic Worlds. Whether it’s deeper management tools and creative options, fresh buildings to construct and customise, or handy shortcuts to make life easier, in Jurassic World Evolution 2, players can truly flex their managerial muscle.

Jurassic World Evolution 2 launches in late 2021 on PC, PS5, Xbox Series X|S, PS4, and Xbox One.”

With the continuation of this fantastic park builder, there remains the question of whether or not we will see other game titles released soon. Will there be a continuation of the popular ‘Lego Jurassic World’ game? Or will we finally get a brand-new first-person exploration of the islands, and beyond? Only time, the ever-flowing river, will tell.

Be sure to check out our detailed analysis of the announcement trailer and screenshots below:

Are you excited for this continuation of ‘Jurassic World: Evolution’? Let us know in the comments below, and as always, stay tuned to Jurassic Outpost for more!

Explore ‘Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis’ Through The Genesis Archives

After much anticipation, The Genesis Archives is now live! ‘Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis’ lovers across the ‘Jurassic’ fandom will be thrilled to find a plethora of JPOG content on this new site! Lucca (Lucca2951 on Twitter) posted the reveal earlier this week on Twitter:

The Genesis Archives site is the complete database for everything related to the fan favorite game.

The Genesis Archives is a non-official / fan encyclopedia for the 2003 game “Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis”.

The objective with this site is to hold most, if not all information ever given related to the game since the beginning of development to release. That includes the released content that comes in the multiple versions of the game, as well as cut content, development notes, and other type of stuff.


We hope to bring these archives in a clean-looking way to help immortalize this wonderful game and its legacy, we plan on adding all the content possible over time to get this site as complete as it can be!

You can spend hours exploring the different areas of The Genesis Archives, which include:

Operation Genesis: a detailed introduction to ‘Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis’

Characters: the characters that you’ll meet during the game, including movie established characters and original characters created for the game, and trivia about them

Dig Sites: maps and tips that will help you with fossil hunting

Dinosaurs: lists and details about the various carnivores and herbivores you’ll encounter, and how to care and feed them

Research: types of research you’ll need to build your park

Exercises: details the various tutorials and scenarios that help you learn the game

Missions: should you choose to accept them… missions you can complete in addition to the Campaign and Exercises

Timeline: dates relating to the development of ‘Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis’

Soundtrack: listen to tracks from the game soundtrack

Videos: game intros and trailers

Cut Content: all the various elements that were cut from the game

It’s very exciting to see JPOG get some recognition and a site dedicated to the best ‘Jurassic’ game! Thanks to Lucca for sharing the site with the fandom!

What is your favorite about Operation Genesis? Let us know in the comments!

‘Jurassic World: Aftermath’ Out Now on Oculus VR Platforms (and We’ve Been Playing It)!

At long last, a Jurassic World game that is not mobile-exclusive or a park builder has arrived! ‘Jurassic World: Aftermath’ is an immersive VR survival adventure game hitting platforms like the recently released Oculus Quest 2, featuring plenty of Dino-action, and compelling storytelling.

Check out the launch trailer below!

We’ve been playing this game the last couple of days, and will have plenty of exciting content hitting our YouTube channel soon – but until then, here are some of the basics you need to know:

‘Jurassic World: Aftermath’ is set 2 years after the events of Jurassic World, prior to events of Fallen Kingdom. You play as Sam, a voiceless protagonist serving as an avatar to the players, who was hired for an illegal asset retrieval mission on Isla Nublar. You were hired by Dr. Mia Everett, an ex Jurassic World geneticist who worked under Dr. Henry Wu. Everett accompanies you to the island and watches your every move via a body camera, all while speaking to and advising you as you explore (think Halo’s Cortana to Master Chief – only if the Chiefs main talent was hacking computers, and hiding in storage lockers).

Dr. Everett’s past with Dr. Wu comes into play throughout the story, as their time working at the park was mired with admiration, tension, and spite. Working on the Velociraptor genetics program together, they eventually butted heads and had a falling out – which could mean life or death on the island as Everett tries to salvage the mysterious operation, and figure out just who she can call for help.

This game is lore rich, with fantastic voice acting by Laura Bailey (Everett), BD Wong (Wu), and Jeff Goldblum (Malcolm). The story has everything to do with Velociraptors, and there is a lot to discover within – including some reveals that may have relevance in 2022’s Jurassic World Dominion. There is a lot to unpack there, and we will have more in-depth coverage soon!

The gameplay is focused on navigating the facilities (including the canonically important, and expanded universe favorite Geothermal Power Plant), getting certain system back online to unlock doors, access computers, and try to survive – all while dodging three Velociraptors. If you’re wondering where these new raptors came from, why they look different, and why they behave differently, worry not – the game has compelling answers for all those questions within the story.

This game has zero combat elements: your tool is your wit, using computer systems to distract the raptors as you crawl through vents, take cover behind tables, or hide within lockers all while hacking into computer systems, or looking for items needed to progress. You also have a flashlight, which you can use to spook the occasional Dilophosaurus, which will try ambush you from ventilation openings. All of this leads to exciting ‘raptors in the kitchen’ like moments of cat and mouse tactics, much like Alien Isolation at a smaller scale and budget.

While this games budget is notably smaller, the voice acting is top tier, as is the music. The story is incredibly compelling – and certainly seems to be canon – but shorter, and clearly episodic, with an expansion coming in 2021. The cel shaded visuals looks crisp, though I really can’t help but wonder if a more realistic style would have been better positioned for the VR format. After-all, it’s all about breaking the confines of a screen and bringing that world to life for the player. Thankfully, the gameplay is well polished, and that’s what really matters.

If you have a VR capable device, or are planning to pick something like the Oculus Quest 2 already, this game is not to be missed for Jurassic story fans (Side bar: also pick up Vader Immortal and SuperHot — they really are must-haves for the VR platform. They made me a believer.). If you’re waiting for more information, fair play as well! Be sure to stay tuned to Jurassic Outpost, where we will have in-depth video coverage coming, including a Quest 2 unboxing, lore videos, and a formal review in the days to come!

New VR Video Game ‘Jurassic World Aftermath’ Announced for Oculus Quest

Earlier this year we discovered that Universal Pictures had trademarked Jurassic World Aftermath. While we initially thought this could be a revival of the cancelled video game Jurassic World Survivor, today the announcement came for a new VR video game for Oculus Quest.

The game is set two years after the fall of Jurassic World and is set on Isla Nublar. See the description below:

Set two years after the fall of Jurassic World, the suspenseful Jurassic World Aftermath sends you back to Isla Nublar in search of confidential research materials lost in the evacuation. The problem? A crash landing has left you stranded in the rundown ruins of a now-abandoned research facility—and deadly Velociraptors stalk your every move. You’ll have to rely on your wits (and a bit of luck) to escape the island alive in this tense and thrilling adventure from Oculus, Universal Games and Digital Platforms, and Coatsink Games.

And check out the trailer:

While many were eagerly anticipating a triple-A game for major gaming consoles, unfortunately for now only users of the Oculus will be able to play this Jurassic adventure.

Either way, Jurassic World Aftermath looks like it could be a lot of fun, so let us know in the comments section down below if you have an Oculus Quest and if you’ll be playing the game.

New Jurassic World Content Comes to LEGO Brawls Mobile Game

LEGO and Red Games have launched new Jurassic World content in the LEGO Brawls mobile game, which is exclusive to the Apple Arcade platform.

This new integration allows players to battle and brawl with their favourite Jurassic World minifigures, which comes in the form of an Isla Nublar inspired level.

Both the Tyrannosaurus Rex and the Indominus Rex are additions to the game, allowing players to use dino powerups to crush the competition, and unlock the new Brawls champion, Owen Grady.

There will be Jurassic World minifigs available to players each week, and the more you play the more trophies and new content you earn! Check out the trailer below:

You can access this new game at the Apple App Store. This new LEGO content is yet another Jurassic World LEGO tie-in, with a Nickelodeon Jurassic World mini series debuting September 14th. In case you missed it, check out the first episode which is available to watch now.

Deathground – The ‘Jurassic Park’ Style Dinosaur Survival Horror Game That We Need

A new Kickstarter has launched for an upcoming dinosaur survival horror game known as Deathground. The game is described as a solo and co-op survival horror game that throws players into a desperate battle for survival against deadly AI dinosaurs.

The Jurassic Park franchise has unfortunately been a stranger to survival horror video games, with efforts in the past often being cancelled before completion. Jurassic Park: Survival was a cancelled Playstation 2 video game that was third person and similar to Tomb Raider in gameplay style. It was set on a mysterious third island and for its time appeared to be the horror survival game fans had wanted.

In more recent years, Universal Pictures had trademarked Jurassic World: Survivor, which was known to be an open world third or first person survival game taking place on Isla Nublar. It was being developed by Cryptic Studios but ceased development at some point in 2017.

This year, Universal Pictures trademarked Jurassic World: Aftermath, which we believe could be the same game, perhaps under a new developer. So far the game has not been officially discussed.

And that brings us to now. Five movies into the franchise and not a single, modern (we can’t forget Trespasser) survival adventure game. Nothing with a similar style to The Last of Us, or Alien: Isolation, which are arguably two of the most defining in that genre.

Based on the trailer, Deathground promises to be the survival game Jurassic fans have been looking for, mixing deep jungles with InGen looking facilities, it does appear to be heavily Jurassic Park inspired. Check out the video below:

The game already looks very promising and has strong Dino Crisis vibes, and it’s hard to argue with the beautiful imagery that it isn’t Jurassic inspired.

As huge dinosaur fanatics and experienced game developers, we’re building a game that we’re extremely passionate about and believe this is a game people would love to play. For years, we’ve spotted all types of requests and comments across the internet for this game type. We’ve heard your calls and this is our answer!

We’re a collective of experienced game development professionals and specialists in Unreal Engine. Beyond this, we have a wide range of talented collaborators we frequently work with who can help us create something incredible. So we feel we’re in a great position to develop a game like this and we’ve come to Kickstarter for your support on this journey!

The game aims to fully immerse you in its world, using dynamic weather changes and unpredictable AI dinosaurs to create a suspenseful and challenging experience for the player.

They are using Unreal Engine 4 to create beautiful environments that scream Isla Nublar/Isla Sorna, and currently there are four main dinosaurs in the game, with more to be added.

The team behind the game are looking for £80,000, and with their experience of 10 plus years working in the industry, they believe reaching that figure will allow them to get the game into early access.

Jaw Drop Games have worked on a number of AAA games, including Alien Isolation, Lego Star Wars, Dirt 5, and more. They share a lot of experience in various forms of gameplay which, when put together, will help make this ‘independent’ game feel as real as it can.

With Universal showing no signs of filling this gap in the video game market, Deathground is worth looking at, and if you’re impressed with what you see then please consider donating to this game. Even a small donation goes a long way, and personally I’m excited to see what the team can really do once they reach their Kickstarter goal.

The campaign ends on August 7 and there are many rewards that come with your pledge, so be sure to go check it out and if you like what you see, donate what you can!

Let us know what you think of this game, and what Jurassic Park game you’d like to see in the comments section below!

Universal Pictures Trademarks New Video Game ‘Jurassic World Aftermath’!

In 2016 Perfect World Entertainment were in development on a new video game titled Jurassic World Survivor, which was rumoured to take place immediately after the events in Jurassic World. The game was described as an open world third person survival game taking place on Isla Nublar. However, it wasn’t long before we learned that the game had ceased development.


Development footage of the cancelled game ‘Jurassic World Survivor’

This certainly is nothing new to Jurassic fans who are all too familiar with video game cancellations, but don’t get too sad just yet. Universal Pictures have now registered a new trademark – Jurassic World Aftermath, which is also for a video game. The application was filed on 14th April and appears to be strikingly similar to the trademark for Survivor.

The description provided to the USPTO for JURASSIC WORLD AFTERMATH is Recorded interactive multi-media software for playing games; downloadable interactive multi-media software for playing games; downloadable software in the nature of a mobile application for playing games and accessing entertainment content for use with computers, portable handheld digital electronic communication devices, mobile devices, wired and wireless communication devices, and video game consoles; recorded computer game software for wireless and electronic mobile devices, mobile phones, hand-held electronic devices, and video game consoles; downloadable computer game software for wireless and electronic mobile devices, mobile phones, hand-held electronic devices, and video game consoles; computer game discs; video game discs; wireless communication devices and wireless communication systems comprised of computer hardware and recorded software for the transmission of audio, voice, and images; recorded computer virtual reality game software; downloadable virtual reality game software.

We’re going to hazard a guess that Aftermath is what Survivor has become, and that the game will follow a similar story to what we came to learn about it’s predecessor. As the previous developer of ‘Survivor’ Cryptic Studios Seattle has closed, we’re unsure how much content from that game can be utilized, but logically speaking they may be picking up from where Cryptic left off. No word on a developer at this point, but word is some well known studios were exploring the Jurassic IP over the last year or so.

The domain name JurassicWorldAftermath.com was also registered on 14th April, the same day as the trademark, however the owner of this domain cannot be verified at this time.

We know very little about the game, but what we came to learn about Jurassic World Survivor was that it was an open world third person survival game that takes place on Isla Nublar, shortly after the events in Jurassic World. The game centered around player-created characters that have to survive the subsequent carnage that the Indominus Rex created on the island.

The story may have changed and this may be a completely different game, but the title alone leads us to believe this video game will indeed take place after the events seen in Jurassic World.

Stay tuned to Jurassic Outpost for more on this upcoming video game and be sure to sound off in the comments below (except for you Ben) on what you’d like to see in a Jurassic World video game!

Sources: Trademarkia