Never-Before-Seen Early Concept Video Of The “Raptors In The Kitchen” Sequence From ‘Jurassic Park’!

Ever since ‘Jurassic World’ put a spotlight back on the ‘Jurassic Park’ franchise, things from the productions of the original films that were long buried in the depths of files, folders, and boxes have been unearthed. Scripts, storyboards, original artwork, and now a previously unseen concept video presented by Jurassic Time!

One of the scenes from ‘Jurassic Park’ that the production spent a lot of pre-planning was the famous “Raptors In The Kitchen” sequence near the climax of the film. It went through many variations as evidenced in the scripts, storyboards, and animatics. However, this newly-revealed concept video shows yet another variation on the entire sequence with a key difference that sets it apart from anything previously known.

The concept video (which Jurassic Time has enhanced with resources and added music from the ‘Rick Carter’s Jurassic Park’ score to make it more watchable) begins with a series of storyboards that depict Dr. Alan Grant, Tim, and Lex entering the Visitor Center after they have trekked through the park. And unlike every known version of the sequence, Grant leaves them in the restaurant with a park worker who just happens to still be in there. After Grant leaves to find the others, the worker goes into the kitchen to prepare a meal for the hungry kids.

Previously unseen storyboard of a park worker meeting with Grant and the kids in the Visitor Center.

Shortly after, a raptor’s shadow grazes over a mural against a restaurant wall that features its likeness. The kids retreat into the kitchen to hide. As the raptor approaches the door to the kitchen and opens it, the storyboards change into actual video footage of an unfinished raptor suit worn by John Rosengrant from Stan Winston Studios. He walks into a makeshift version of the kitchen set, using a collection of tables, real items, and even some hand-drawn representations. But he isn’t alone; he is quickly joined by another raptor represented by a life-size cardboard cutout! Together, the two “raptors” stalk Tim and Lex; played by the production’s Art Director John Bell and Art Department Coordinator Caroline Quinn. From here, video footage becomes intermixed with additional storyboards.

Carboard cutout raptor in foreground with raptor suit in background.

Head of the raptor suit looking toward the camera.

Lex (Caroline Quinn) and Tim (John Bell) crawling and hiding from the raptors.

Together, the two “kids” avoid the raptors by crawling around the kitchen floor between the long tables, similar to the final version of the film. However, in this version both kids climb into the cubby that is reflected against the shiny cabinetry (or in this video’s case, an actual mirror is used to sell the idea) as a raptor charges into it instead of them. The kids crawl away once again, but before the raptors can make another move, the park worker enters the kitchen from the pantry where he had been preparing the kids’ meal. The park worker, played by set designer John Berger, sees the raptors and drops the meal.

The park worker (John Berger) emerges from the pantry with the kids’ meal in tow, surprised by the sight of the raptors.

To protect himself and the children from the raptors, the park worker grabs a pair of knives that are nearby. Unfortunately, he is no match for the teeth and claws of the raptors as they both leap on top of him! The kids watch as the park worker is maimed by the vicious dinosaurs, but then take advantage of the distraction to escape from the kitchen. Of course, the raptors spot their exit… and it is only a matter of time before they catch up to them. (It is interesting to note that the freezer is not featured at all in this concept, despite it being used in some form in all the other versions.)

Knives can’t stop the raptors as the park worker meets his demise.

This storyboard/video hybrid was created by the film’s art department for director Steven Spielberg to see. It is unclear exactly when in the production this was made, but a good portion of the storyboards used were from later incarnations of the sequence (while also including some that have never been seen before). The raptor suit used is also unfinished, so this may have also been a concept to show off how it looked in the sequence for feedback on any desired tweaks. It’s also interesting that the pantry was once part of the set, as evidenced by blueprints that have been finding their way online; and this concept of the sequence shows why it was once included.

Section of blueprint featuring where the pantry was, beside the freezer.

Just when a fan, such as I, thinks they know all the production’s ideas that were brought to the table… something like this is found! Whether one agrees with the ideas in this concept or not, it is thrilling to see yet another variation of what could have been in the film. ‘Jurassic Park’ had a monumental production team, and this video proves once again just how free their ideas were allowed to shape the classic film we have today.

Be sure to also check out Jurassic Time‘s illustrated audio drama series, Rick Carter’s Jurassic Park, that explores an entirely different version of the film as envisioned by its production designer!

What do you think of this concept video? Do you think this would have been a better version of the sequence? Just who was this park worker? Share your comments down below!

See An Early Version Of ‘Jurassic Park’ With Concept Art & Storyboards In An EPIC Audio Drama

Experience an early version of ‘JURASSIC PARK’ through production designer Rick Carter’s adaptation of Michael Crichton’s final draft screenplay, brought to life in an entertaining audio drama with visual enhancements!

Watch the entire illustrated audio drama series, plus its introduction and teaser trailer, below.

RICK CARTER’S ‘JURASSIC PARK’ was an epic project born out of the dire 2020 pandemic lockdown. Author Derrick Davis, the creator of JURASSIC TIME and writer at JURASSIC OUTPOST, had acquired many rare and previously unseen selections of concept art, storyboards, scripts, and other materials related to the original ‘Jurassic Park’. One of the most interesting items he acquired was a unique script that had many elements that would eventually be scrapped, but would also shape the final film, and beyond.

The official history behind Jurassic Park’s screenwriting process had always included Michael Crichton, Malia Scotch Marmo, and David Koepp. During this time, the film’s production designer, Rick Carter, took on a bigger role than normal.

“I was brought onto ‘Jurassic Park’ about two years before we finally started shooting […] On most shows, the production designer is brought in and handed a script and asked to visualize it. Not so on this one. I was in on many early meetings with Steven where we would break down the scenes in the book and discuss which ones would work best for the film.”

-Rick Carter

In the beginning, Michael Crichton had provided several drafts of the screenplay for his novel before passing the pen to whoever would take a crack at future drafts. Director Steven Spielberg went on to film ‘HOOK’, as Jurassic Park’s production team continued to work.

“While Spielberg was doing ‘HOOK’, I would go to him with all these different ideas of how to make things work. It was a very managed production.”

-Rick Carter

One of the ways Rick Carter displayed his ideas was by crafting an entirely new script using much of Crichton’s as the backbone.

“After our last script meetings, I began collecting together my notes. I realized that the only way for me to see how the ideas might actually play out in the story was for me to “collage” them into Michael’s latest script. Well, one thing led to another and I found myself going through the entire story.”

-Rick Carter

Out of all the scripts written for ‘Jurassic Park’, Carter’s version is perhaps the most interesting. It includes the early process of making John Hammond a more sympathetic character, the sick triceratops replacing the sick stegosaurus, and other changes from Crichton that will feel more familiar to how the film ended up. At the same time, the script introduces some interesting changes that would not carry over. This includes using the opening of the novel at the Costa Rican clinic, a condensed version of the river sequence, the removal of Donald Gennaro, Hammond’s idea of recruiting Grant and Sattler to work at the park, the discovery of a raptor den secretly nestled far beyond their pen, trees that are deforested by the giant dinosaurs, and the inclusion of lava fields. There’s even an umbrella designed to look like a “spitter” that is used as a distraction against a velociraptor; an idea similarly used in ‘Jurassic World’.

A “spitter” umbrella from the gift shop, used in defense against a velociraptor.

It’s not every day that a production designer writes a screenplay to get his ideas across in order to make the film a success. But Rick Carter was a special production designer. While his version of the script would not end up being used for the film, it wasn’t his intent anyway. He simply wanted the best way to further continue the production progress of ‘Jurassic Park’, and he felt altering the script was the best way to do it.

But what if it had been made? What would it have been like? Would it have felt just as grand, just engaging, and just as memorable? Or would it have had its own unique flavor that no one else could have concocted?

Lava fields that Grant and the kids must traverse through.

After nearly 30 years since it had been written, Derrick Davis had discovered the script and wanted to know the answers to all of those questions. He decided the best way to experience this early version of the film was to bring it to life. This led to him teaming up with another fan of the franchise, music composer Bernard A. Kyer. Derrick presented him with the idea of creating an audio drama experience from the script. He would do this by using concept art, storyboards, and other official artwork to illustrate it; many of which had never been seen before. Bernard took the script and adjusted it to flow in this format, while Derrick went to several fans of ‘Jurassic Park’ that could perform various roles, including himself as Tim Murphy and John Hammond.

One of those fans suggested by Bernard was artist, filmmaker, and actor Joshua Malone; the voice of Ed Regis, Dr. Alan Grant, and Lex Murphy. He also provided the narration for the program’s teaser trailer and further consultation throughout. Other cast members include Jurassic Outpost’s Samantha Endres as Dr. Ellie Sattler, and Caleb Burnett as Dr. Ian Malcolm; as well as designer Casey Wayne Cook, Jr. as Dr. Henry Wu and others.

Within almost a year’s time, Bernard assembled all the character performances while providing the script narration and additional voices, such as Dennis Nedry. The process included mixing a vast library of sound effects, many obtained from the film itself to instill further authenticity. Once that was completed, he composed a fantastic music score to bring it all to life; inspired not only by John Williams but other composers like Jerry Goldsmith, James Horner, and Danny Elfman.

After the audio was completed, Derrick assembled all the artwork he could find to match what was described, while enhancing it for high definition. Despite obtaining rare materials for years, including an entire binder of storyboards from ‘Dinosaur Supervisor’ Phil Tippett‘s collection, there was still much more that he needed. One of the people he had been in contact with over the years that had a great source for artwork and storyboards from the film was fellow collector and fan Astríd Vega of The Jurassic Park Collection and its YouTube channel. Derrick had shared and discussed the Rick Carter script with her long ago, and had even offered her various voice roles in an earlier-proposed version of the audio drama. Tragically, Astríd passed away in May of 2019… almost a year since Derrick had finally met her in-person at Universal Studios Hollywood’s Jurassic Park 25th Anniversary Event in May of 2018. Without her collection that she had shared, large portions of the video for this audio drama would not have been possible. The production is dedicated in her memory.

From Jurassic Park’s 25th Anniversary Event at Universal Studios Hollywood, 2018. From left to right: Roberto Díaz, Matthew Danczak, Derrick Davis, Astríd Vega, & Brian Belukha.

Despite amassing quite a collection of original and official materials, there was still a need for additional artwork. This task was completed by fellow fan and artist Felipe Humboldt. Felipe created several character sketches and scenic paintings based on descriptions in the script, which sometimes differed greatly from how they ended up in the final film. It should also be noted that character appearances changed even during the process of the original production itself, creating unavoidable inconsistencies throughout. Felipe also illustrated some additional moments from the script where no official artwork existed or could be found.

Felipe Humboldt’s depiction of Dr. Alan Grant wearing a makeshift papoose with a baby raptor; Lex and Tim at his side.

The end result is a one-of-a-kind experience that was an ultimate labor of love from everyone involved. While the debate can rage forever if this early version of the film would have been better than what we got, it is still fascinating to see it performed in such a dramatic way. It is also great to finally have an engaging way of presenting the art from those who worked on the film, such as Art Director John Bell, instead of having it locked away or forgotten forever.

Derrick Davis thanks everyone in the production for bringing his dream to life and realizing the imaginations of those who worked so hard to create our cherished, classic film: ‘JURASSIC PARK’.

An early “raptor pen” concept by John Bell, which was also seen briefly in the background of Jurassic Park in the film; during the lunch scene, projected on a wall.

Learn more about Bernard’s process of crafting the sound design and music score for the illustrated audio drama by checking out each of his four in-depth articles from his site. Be sure to also hear Bernard’s album release of his music score for the project!

Be sure to watch the entire series for the ultimate experience of this early version of ‘JURASSIC PARK’! Also check out everything else available at JURASSIC TIME, including the John Hammond Memoir!

Poster Created by Casey Wayne Cook Jr.

Would this earlier version of the film have been better, or are you glad we ended up with the final film we got? Share your thoughts in the comments below!

This article includes quotes and information from ‘The Making Of Jurassic Park’ book, ‘Starlog’ and ‘Cinefantastique’ magazines, and additional public and private collections.

New Look at iconic Jurassic Park prop in Youtube documentary

It may have been almost 28 years since the release of Jurassic Park, but it seems like we still get a fresh look at everyone’s favourite classic every year. And that is exactly what the new Youtube docs-series ‘Art of the Prop‘ will be doing tomorrow with their premiere episode featuring the iconic artwork from the Visitors’ Center mural.

Originally painted by artist Douglas Henderson, the massive glass mural depicted a prehistoric jungle scene, complete with a family of Parasaurs, a pair of Brachiosaurs, a Gallimimus and a Velociraptor, most notable for it’s terrifying shadow play in the film’s climax! It was briefly revisited in 2015’s Jurassic World, and even inspired a training room in its sequel Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom.

The documentary will showcase never before seen concept art, including a rare glimpse at all three sections of the mural and features an exclusive interview with Douglas Henderson.

Art of the Prop: Jurassic Park, Evolution of a Mural premieres March 7th at 7pm EST on YouTube.

Excited to get a close up glimpse of this piece of Jurassic-history? What other iconic props would you like to get up close and personal with? Sound off below!

Jurassic Park’s Art Director John Bell Posts Unseen Art From The Original Films & Jurassic World!

Jurassic Park had an army of artists that helped shape the visual look of the film. Pre-production began in the summer of 1990, a full three years before its 1993 release date. During that time, the scripts changed pens between different writers, but the art department kept churning out images that didn’t necessarily match anything from them. Ideas were freely explored using Michael Crichton’s novel as the main source, while the artists injected their own personalities.

Leading the art department was Jurassic Park‘s Art Director John Bell, who we interviewed back in 2015. He also worked on the sequels: The Lost World: Jurassic Park, Jurassic Park 3, and Jurassic World. Despite his involvement in the franchise beginning almost 30 years ago, there are still many pieces of artwork he created that have yet to see the light of day. There was so much that his team created that it would likely fill an entire library!

That is why we are elated with the new posts John made on his website of previously unseen art from Jurassic Park!

Below are a small sample of what you will see:

His site also features some new amazing artwork from The Lost World: Jurassic Park! The amount of detail and ideas he had for the film’s various vehicles is astounding; including a “life pod” used as protection against big predators such as Tyrannosaurs Rex!

John has also shown, for the first time, artwork he created for Jurassic Park 3! This is especially fascinating to see since Jurassic Park 3 never had a “Making Of” book like the first two films did; leaving insights on its filmmaking process only on DVD/BLU-RAY bonus features, magazine articles, and other websites from those involved. His new page features impressive unused vehicle designs and early versions of the incubators!

And finally, we have additional artwork John created for Jurassic World, or as it was simply known to him at the time as Jurassic Park 4. We now have an incredible look at some of his more futuristic designs meshed with his older ideas for Jurassic Park in a way that would have been incredible to have seen on film!

It’s amazing that after all this time we are still getting never-before-seen material from the older films of this franchise! No matter how any of the films turned out, it goes to show just how much time and effort went into the creation of them. And who knows, maybe more will be seen someday?

In a darkened room, in an empty building with a dirty floor, it waits…

Be sure to visit John Bell’s site for additional art and browse his very own shop where you can buy some of his original work!

Universal Orlando Resort Releases First Look at Jurassic World ‘Velocicoaster’ Ride Vehicles!

“I don’t get it. It says InGen on the side of that ride vehicle!”

Universal Orlando Resort released a first look at what park guests will be riding in when the Jurassic World Velocicoaster becomes a reality next year:

The reveal video describes the vehicles as “designed for speed” and “engineered for the hunt”, seemingly comparing them to a predatory velociraptor pursuing its prey.

The ride vehicles are strikingly futuristic and feature sleek proportions, bright lights on the headrests and front areas, and a shiny canvas of that signature ‘Jurassic World’ blue. The iconic Jurassic T. rex skeleton logo and the InGen company logo adorn the side and rear sections of the vehicles.

Gregory Hall, who has been responsible for creative and art direction on the Velocicoaster, shared more official images of the ride vehicles on Twitter shortly after the announcement:

The ride vehicles certainly look to be equipped for top speeds that will excite theme park and Jurassic fans alike. While their design aligns with the bright, modern aesthetic of the Mercedes vehicles and other designs that we have seen in ‘Jurassic World’ and beyond, it is a bit distanced from the established rugged, jungle safari theme found in previous Jurassic rides and attractions.

What do you think of the Jurassic World Velocicoaster ride vehicles? How excited are you for the ride to open next summer? One thing is for sure: we can’t wait to experience the Velocicoaster when it opens to the public Summer 2021.

Share your thoughts in the comments below!

Behind the Scenes Look at Designing Jurassic World Dinosaur Toys with Mattel’s Kristen Sanzari

Since their release in 2018 alongside Fallen Kingdom, Mattel’s Jurassic World line have taken over the toy aisle, and captured the attention of fans and collectors alike. Recently, we spoke to Kristen Sanzari – one of the designers on the Jurassic World toy line – about her work, and how she came to design dinosaurs for this continuously evolving range of action figures.

Kristen provided numerous design sheet images, that document part of the process that designing these toys undergo. In the images you can see reference photos, design change notes, and how things like action features are created.

Read on to learn about Kristen’s work directly from her, and of course, check out the images!

“I have been designing Jurassic World toys at Mattel for almost 3 years now, and people often ask how I got into toy design. So, I will give you a little background. I grew up with a love of drawing animals and my favorite animation characters. I loved my toys and loved animation. When it came time to go to college, I went to Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, where I studied graphic design and ran on the track team. I loved graphic design but knew I still wanted to study animation, so after graduating from Cal Poly, I moved to San Francisco, where I attended the Academy of Art University to get my master’s in visual development for animation.

After graduating, I got a job as a graphic designer/illustrator at a toy and publishing company called Artistic Studios (now Bendon Publishing). I worked on licensed craft sets and toys and loved it, but I was still mostly doing graphic design and package design, with only a little bit of illustration here and there. Wanting to do more concept art, I began applying to jobs at animation studios and toy companies in LA. I interviewed with Mattel for the Jurassic World product design position with a portfolio full of concept art for animation. Although similar in a lot of ways, I had no toy designs to show. So, after the interview I drew up some toy concepts focused on Jurassic, and luckily my now boss had faith I could design toys and I got the job.

Was I a dinosaur expert or a Jurassic park fanatic prior to getting the job? No, but I liked dinosaurs, I had seen some of the movies, and most of all I loved drawing and learning about animals. So, I made it my mission to learn as much as I could about dinosaurs and the Jurassic Park franchise when I began working on the brand. I watched all the movies a bunch of times, took several paleontology courses online, listened to the Jurassic Outpost Podcast, bought and read multiple dinosaur books and made it a point to learn about and know every dinosaur we designed.

When designing our toys, we begin by brainstorming about what we want that toy to do. Is it a T. Rex that roars and has a massive chomp? Or is it a Pachycephalosaurus that rams its head? There are usually so many great and crazy ideas that come up in brainstorms, but we always do our best to make sure the function of our toys are realistic, on brand, and accentuate what the dinosaur would have done in real life. Something we also focus on is our scale, we do our best to make all our dinosaurs in scale to a 3¾” human action figure, which really allows you to imagine how massive some of these dinosaurs were in real life.

As you can see from many of these design sheets, we start off with an initial drawing of the dinosaur concept and what the feature will be. Sometimes these are based on assets from Universal, for dinosaurs from the films, and sometimes we are able to create the dinosaur designs ourselves. We spend a lot of time creating the patterns and textures, picking the colors of the dinos, and making sure they fit into the look and feel of the dinosaurs in Jurassic World. In the Carnotaurus example you can see that the drawing and the original sculpt are different from the final sculpt and product. This is because we often know what dinosaurs are going to be in the film before knowing exactly what the dinosaurs are going to look like in the film. The toy production timeline is longer than the time it takes to make a film and so often we need to begin our design process before we have all the information. We frequently have to figure out the feature of the toy prior to knowing exactly what the dinosaur will look like, and we just have to be nimble and adjust our designs to fit the look of the movie as soon as we do get the actual assets. Our partners at Universal always do their best to get us the assets and information we need as soon as they can.

Once we have a sculpt we are happy with, and the mechanism is figured out, we can make our first model. The first model is never perfect, but we use it to see if we need to change anything about the sculpt and details, the mechanism function, the articulation, and the color choices. We then take notes on any revisions and make adjustments to improve this model. After all the changes have been accounted for we make a new and improved model. During the entire process there are multiple check points with Universal to make sure they approve the look and function of the dinosaurs.

When the final model is approved we move on to make a “first shot,” which is the first run of the product in plastic. First shots are made in the factories with any leftover or extra plastic they have, so they usually are really crazy colors. For example, we could get a raptor first shot with a pink body, black left leg, blue right leg, green head, and neon yellow arms. We make comments on the first shot and make sure the toy can stand and that the detents and articulations function properly. Next we get our first painted plastic toy sample. At this point the toy is almost complete, but we make sure the plastic and paint colors match, we make sure the mechanism and any electronic features are functioning the way they should, and make sure all the packaging information is aligned with the product. After all these comments are captured we pass them along to make sure our final product is the best it can be. Then, finally we receive the final product!

As a whole the toy design process takes an entire team and I have to say that team Jurassic is made up of some of the most passionate and hard-working people I know. Our design team couldn’t make the toys we do without the enormous help of our awesome marketing team, packaging team, and engineering team. It is truly a team effort and an awesome brand to be a part of.”

Thanks so much to Kristen for taking the time out to speak with us, and to share many of these images! For more from Kristen, you can check out her website here and her Instagram here. With the 2020 Primal Attack line coming soon (which the Sarcosuchus belongs to) , there will surely be more toys to learn about in the future!

What toy do you like the most from Mattel’s line, and what would you like to see more of? Sound off in the comments below, and as always, stay tuned to Jurassic Outpost!


John Hammond Was Killed by Velociraptors in These Newly Unearthed Jurassic Park Storyboards

Although Jurassic Park is now over 26 years old, new stories, art, and secrets continue to be unearthed by its incredibly dedicated and passionate fanbase. This Jurassic June, Jurassic Time has uncovered yet another long-forgotten storyboard from the original Jurassic Park film. It is part of what Jurassic Time dubs as “The Many Deaths Of John Hammond”.

In this newly revealed storyboard page, John Hammond is in Jurassic Park’s control room during the climax when the Raptors have broken out of their pen and have entered the Visitor Center. John Hammond, with an incubator of eggs he plans to take with him upon leaving the park to “save it”, hears Lex screaming downstairs. He opens the door to the control room to help, but is greeted by a Raptor. Hammond falls backward, crashing on a tabletop model of Jurassic Park that is on display in the control room (which was to be very similar to the one we see in Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom), as the Raptor digs its claws deep into his chest. The incubator shatters to the floor, breaking one of the eggs while another remains unharmed.

Later on, Grant finds Hammond in the control room, barely alive, as he tells Grant that he always knew the “first batch of DNA was too unstable” and that he was looking forward to working with him at the park. He then dies as the two men are framed by the destroyed model of Jurassic Park. Then, the one unharmed egg from before cracks open, revealing an infant Triceratops.

This was one of the many deaths originally planned for John Hammond. In the novel, John Hammond dies while falling down a hill then killed by Compies. In Michael Crichton’s first draft of the screenplay, Hammond is in the Visitor Center when he falls into the destroyed scaffolding after being startled by the twitching corpse of a Raptor. Then, he is finished off by Compies like in the novel. Jurassic Time showed an illustration from this depiction some time ago.

This was then followed by Crichton’s final draft, which featured Hammond being killed by a Raptor while the “Welcome Video” of him is being played behind him, stuttering in an eerie effect as he is being attacked. The next version of his death is the one just described with the tabletop model; originating from a script revision actually tackled by someone else no one has ever known to have penned. But that is another story that will be told another time.

The other versions of his death are of Hammond simply being left behind on the island, either by his choice or by accident. Some art and storyboards of this idea were done by Art Director John Bell, with a version of this scripted in Malia Scotch Marmo’s screenplay that followed both Crichton’s and the one the tabletop Raptor death was from.

However, once David Koepp entered into the picture, it was decided Hammond no longer needed to die. Whether it was because Richard Attenborough was cast or the filmmakers decided it didn’t fit their ever-evolving take on the character remains to be seen. It seems to be a good choice for the version of the character they ended up crafting, but it will always be interesting to see just how his many deaths were once going to be played out.

You can find more rare art and storyboards from Jurassic Park at Jurassic Time, along with an audio memoir of John Hammond read by Richard Attenborough that was adapted from the Lost World game Trespasser. It includes a video version with art by Felipe Humboldt, as pictured above, who also has been uncovering many lost relics of the Jurassic Park films via Behind The Gates.

Huge thanks to to Derrick Davis for providing this article and his great work at Jurassic Time!


Never Before Seen Art Surfaces from Cancelled ‘The Lost World: Jurassic Park’ Animated Series!

We were planning on holding this one off until Jurassic June, but much like the dinosaurs of Isla Nublar, we simply couldn’t contain it. While you no doubt know there was an unreleased Jurassic Park animated series in the early 90’s, you probably did not know there was another in development alongside The Lost World. This attempt at bringing Jurassic Park into the animated front was kept under lock and key, without any substantial evidence of existence… until now.

Check out our video below, where dive into the art and story revealed from this elusive, never before seen unreleased Jurassic Park tie-in!

The Lost World’s animated series was commissioned by Steven Spielberg himself, and developed by DreamWorks Animation under the supervision of Steve Lyons. The artwork on display comes from Phillip J. Felix, who also contributed to the story of this ill-fated cartoon venture. Not much is known about the plot, outside of the fact that it would have introduced hybrid dinosaurs to the Jurassic Park franchise for the first time. While the cartoon was eventually shelved due to a variety of internal conflicts, many ideas were adopted by Kenner with the Jurassic Park Chaos Effect toy line (which was also to have a animated series that fell through).

The video above walks you through all the art available, what we know about the story and its titular DOOMSDAY REX, and how the idea of hybrids evolved forward into Jurassic World. Be sure to check it out!

While the art from Phillip may be our only real look at the series, it’s believed these Kenner Jurassic Park Chaos Effect precursor concepts were tied directly to it. Most noticeably, the mech suit is very similar to that of Phillips artwork:

And of course, check out all the art from Phillip below!

The idea of a Jurassic Park primetime animated series was attempted many times over the years, but all became extinct before they were ever even truly alive. While some of the art for the hybrids in this series was a bridge too far for canon, in that era, transmedia story expansions were hardly ever held to continuity, and I would have enjoyed it as its own thing. That said, in today’s world of mega-franchises with expansive expanded universes and spin-offs, I think an animated series would need to stick closer to the source materials content.

While you’re here, check out our exclusive look at the original animated series attempt, ‘Escape from Jurassic Park’, featuring the entire season 1 story treatment! It features an unfinished script, and completely outlines the arc, episode-to-episode – its story goes much further into new territory than the beautiful artwork from William Stout had led us believe!

What do you think of the franchises first real attempts to bring hybrids into the story, prior to Chaos Effect, the Indominus Rex of Jurassic World, and Indoraptor of Fallen Kingdom? What would you have liked to see from this cartoon, and do you think we will ever get a proper Jurassic animated series? Sound off in the comments below, and as always, stay tuned to Jurassic Outpost!

Source: Phillip J Felix


‘Jurassic World’ Animation Supervisor Glen McIntosh Holding Lecture This Saturday at the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Paleontology!

If you’re anywhere near the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Paleontology in Alberta, Canada, you’re in luck! ‘Jurassic World’ Animation Supervisor, Glen McIntosh, is giving a lecture this Saturday May 4th! The lecture will take place on May 4th at 1:30 p.m. in the auditorium, where Glen will talk about realistic creature design and animation.

As a bonus, Glen will be signing original artwork (limited supplies) in the museum lobby after the talk, which is not to be missed!

The lecture is free with admission, so if you’re an artist of any kind, or just a movie or dinosaur fan, it’s something you don’t want to miss! Glen has worked on numerous Jurassic projects, including Jurassic Park 3, World, and Fallen Kingdom, and has worked with both the designs, art, and of course, the animation of the dinosaurs.

Will you be attending? Be sure to share your comments and photos online so!

New Concept Art Shows Alternative Opening, Second Indoraptor, the Spinosaurus, and Early Designs in Jurassic World Fallen Kingdom!

If a picture is worth a thousand words, then this article will one of our most dense to date. Jurassic World Fallen Kingdom has released on Blu-ray, DVD and Digital and with that has come a new wave of artwork from making the film. While the retail releases of the movie were quite light on making of content, and didn’t include any deleted scenes, the artwork from various artist who worked on the film have revealed quite a few alternative sequences that didn’t make the final cut.

Take a look at the concept art from the latest Jurassic Park sequel below – whether or not it’s from a cut scene, or art you’ll see reflected in the movie, it’s all sure to please.

Christopher Brändström

The artwork from Christopher Brändström focuses on early passes of the Indoraptor, where the initial plan was to show off a few experiments gone wrong in the development process of the new breed of dinosaurs. Further, it showcases an alternate opening of Fallen Kingdom, serving to introduce the Mosasaurus in the open ocean attacking a whaling vessel.

Jama Jurabaev

Jama’s artwork served as the basis for many keyframes, final approved dinosaur designs, and more. Some of the most striking pieces of art reveal that there were originally meant to be two Indoraptors who would eventually fight, leaving the one we know from the film victorious. Also notable is his early 3D model of the Allosaurus which looks more like the real animal, and the fact the Sinoceratops was to be called Pachyrhinosaurus with no design differences.

Further, his art explored an alternate more intense version of the stampede and raging wildfires, which was later replaced with a more lighthearted adventure action sequence. Finally, two pieces of art also showcase the Spinosaurus, which would have been killed by the T. rex instead of the Carnotaurus.

As time goes on, more artwork will surely be released for Jurassic World Fallen Kingdom. While there are currently no plans for an artbook, and thus no commentary for how the art led to the final designs and story, these images can still be both insightful and captivating as making of content.

Sound off and let us know what your favorite piece is, and if you would eventually like to see art books for various Jurassic Park films!

Source: jamajurabaev, chrisbrandart