Tickets Now Available to ‘Generation Jurassic’ Event at Universal Studios Hollywood!

UPDATE: Thank you for your interest in the Generation Jurassic event! Unfortunately, we have reached full capacity for this event. Please follow us for more details including on how to watch the event unfold.

Tickets are now available to the recently announced ‘Generation Jurassic’ event occurring at Universal Studios Hollywood on April 28th, 2022! RSVP here or read on for more information.

Working with Universal Brand Development, we’re excited to be part of the upcoming after hours fan-event occurring at Universal Studios Hollywood on April 28th, 2022. The event is limited capacity RSVP only – read on for more details about what to expect, and additional information on ticketing.

TICKETS:

TICKETS NOW AVAILABLE – RSVP NOW
Due to the limited capacity of this event, tickets will be at a first-come-first-serve basis here.

Generation Jurassic is a free after hours event, and tickets do not include general admission into the park. Valid photo ID matching name on RSVP required. Universal Studios Hollywood follows all current Los Angeles County COVID protocols. Please refer to the additional info on ticket form here.

ABOUT:

Generation Jurassic Event – April 28th – Presented by Universal and Target

Universal and Target, along with super fan site, Jurassic Outpost, have come together to create an exclusive event for Jurassic fans of all ages – Generation Jurassic will be held on April 28th from 7:30-10pm at Universal Studios Hollywood. Against the backdrop of “Jurassic World—The Ride” within the theme park, fans will get to celebrate all things Jurassic and experience a variety of activities, including:

  • Participate in a LIVE “Jurassic World: Beyond the Gates” panel discussion, plus Q&A with toy designers from Universal, Mattel and Funko, including reveals of all-new Target-exclusive items
  • Explore product displays of the latest and greatest toys, apparel, collectibles and more
  • Experience the thrills on Jurassic World: The Ride, including coming face-to- face with the stunningly realistic dinosaur Indominus rex
  • Explore DinoPlay, a fun interactive area for kids
  • Take part in photo opportunities with fan-favorite dinosaurs and vehicles (thanks to the Jurassic Park Motor Pool!)
  • Try your luck with giveaways of awesome Jurassic World products!
  • We’re excited to bring ‘Beyond the Gates’ alive in an all-new way, showcasing the talent of artists creating the numerous Jurassic World products. This is a unique opportunity to dive deeper than ever into the making-of process, let fans ask their burning questions, and of course, feature some exciting exclusive reveals.

    More details about what else to expect will become available as we inch closer to the event .

    As always, be sure to stay tuned to Jurassic Outpost for more information coming soon. We hope to see you there!

    ‘Generation Jurassic’ Event Presented by Universal Brand Development and Target Coming to Universal Studios Hollywood April 28th 2022

    Update March 28th, 2022 at 9pm EST: Tickets now available.

    UPDATE 2: Thank you for your interest in the Generation Jurassic event! Unfortunately, we have reached full capacity for this event. Please follow us for more details including on how to watch the event unfold.

    If you missed the recent episode of Beyond the Gates then you may have missed the news about an upcoming exclusive event occurring in California. So what are you waiting for? Check out the episode below, and then read on for all the important details:

    Working with Universal Brand Development, we’re excited to be part of the upcoming after hours fan-event occurring at Universal Studios Hollywood on April 28th, 2022. The event will be limited capacity RSVP only – read on for more details about what to expect, and information on how to lock your tickets in.

    ABOUT:

    Generation Jurassic Event – April 28th – Presented by Universal and Target

    Universal and Target, along with super fan site, Jurassic Outpost, have come together to create an exclusive event for Jurassic fans of all ages – Generation Jurassic will be held on April 28th from 7:30-10pm at Universal Studios Hollywood. Against the backdrop of “Jurassic World—The Ride” within the theme park, fans will get to celebrate all things Jurassic and experience a variety of activities, including:

  • Participate in a LIVE “Jurassic World: Beyond the Gates” panel discussion, plus Q&A with toy designers from Universal, Mattel and Funko, including reveals of all-new Target-exclusive items
  • Explore product displays of the latest and greatest toys, apparel, collectibles and more
  • Experience the thrills on Jurassic World: The Ride, including coming face-to- face with the stunningly realistic dinosaur Indominus rex
  • Explore DinoPlay, a fun interactive area for kids
  • Take part in photo opportunities with fan-favorite dinosaurs and vehicles (thanks to the Jurassic Park Motor Pool!)
  • Try your luck with giveaways of awesome Jurassic World products!
  • TICKETS:

    TICKETS NOW AVAILABLE – RSVP NOW
    Due to the limited capacity of this event, tickets will be at a first-come-first-serve basis here.

    Generation Jurassic is a free after hours event, and tickets do not include general admission into the park. Valid photo ID matching name on RSVP required. Universal Studios Hollywood follows all current Los Angeles County COVID protocols. Please refer to the additional info on ticket form here.

    We’re excited to bring ‘Beyond the Gates’ alive in an all-new way, showcasing the talent of artists creating the numerous Jurassic World products. This is a unique opportunity to dive deeper than ever into the making-of process, let fans ask their burning questions, and of course, feature some exciting exclusive reveals.

    More details about what else to expect will become available as we inch closer to the event, and we hope to make the attendance RSVP available ASAP.

    As always, be sure to stay tuned to Jurassic Outpost for more information coming soon. We hope to see you there!

    Watch ‘Devil In The Desert’, A New Fan-Film Set After ‘Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom’!

    ‘Jurassic World: Dominion’ still hasn’t unveiled a trailer, ‘Camp Cretaceous’ is behind us for now, and apart from some advertisements associated with the Olympics; not much is happening. This will all change very soon, but in the meantime wouldn’t it be nice to watch a short film connected to the story of the movies? No, I don’t mean the fantastic ‘Battle At Big Rock’ from years ago (although you should definitely check that out if you somehow haven’t). Fans have created their own films! One of these fans, Joshua Malone, an aspiring actor and filmmaker, has recently unleashed a brand-new film: ‘Devil In The Desert’!

    Click Image To Watch The Film!

    Created in association with the Colorado Northwestern Community College and their paleontology program, ‘Devil In The Desert’ is a found footage-style production that takes place after the events of ‘Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom’. Filmed on location at a real dig site in Colorado, follow a group of paleontologists as they go about their daily work… until “the devil” slowly begins to reveal itself. Could a dinosaur from Lockwood Manor’s grand escape have made its way to them? If so, who better to handle a dinosaur than a group of dinosaur experts? Or is real-life much more dangerous than its buried ancestors could have foretold?

    When asked about what it was like to direct and work with actual paleontologists on the film, Josh said:

    “It was interesting because some of us had some previous experience and some didn’t, but everyone was really on board with this. We didn’t have a script, at all. It was just us constantly brainstorming and coming up with scenes on the spot while we were taking breaks or after dinners. Everyone out there loved dinosaurs and enjoys ‘Jurassic’ so we all just were like, “How would we handle running into a Lockwood dinosaur?”, and it went from there. The dig site itself is incredible, and the field program Colorado Northwestern Community College offers is truly unique and an amazing experience.”

    ‘Devil In The Desert’ is a fun and creepy little film that is sure to delight ‘Jurassic’ fans! Joshua Malone’s recent additional works include Haunted: A Halloween Horror Nights Fan-Film and several voice roles in Rick Carter’s Jurassic Park: An Illustrated Audio Drama.

    What other ‘Jurassic’-related fan films have you seen that you love? Share your thoughts in the comments below, and always stay tuned to Jurassic Outpost for the latest!

    Beyond The Gates Returns with the All-New Jurassic World HAMMOND COLLECTION!

    The gates are BACK open with another season of our collector-focused show Beyond The Gates!

    We’ve once again partnered up with the fantastic teams at Universal, Target, and Mattel to produce this fun, Jurassic reveal show from the fans – for the fans! Check out the debut episode below:

    In episode 1 we speak with Mattel’s toy designer Gregory Murphy about the brand new collector focused line: the Hammond Collection, and dive into the designing and painting of the two debut items: The Lost World’s Parasaurolophus, and Fallen Kingdom’s Baryonyx.

    The Hammond Collection named for Jurassic Park’s founder John Parker Hammond and sets a new standard for Jurassic collectables, marrying the detail you knew from the Amber Collection with the core 3.75″ scale. This means more dinosaurs than ever of all sizes from across the entire franchise.

    Discover the thrills and adventure of the Jurassic World Series captured in the Hammond Collection, named for Jurassic Park’s founder John Parker Hammond and setting a new standard for dinosaur collectables, including the fearsome Baryonyx! With premium design and attention to detail, this 13 inch long Baryonyx from Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom has incredible movie-accurate design, color and texture, and 20 points of articulation, from a terrifying wide double-articulated jaw to a posable tail and 3 joints on the back legs.

    With premium design that is movie-quality in detail, this 12 inch long Parasaurolophus action figure from The Lost World: Jurassic Park will delight fans and collectors. This figure has incredible movie-accurate design, color and texture, and about 14 points of articulation, including an articulated mouth, tail and multiple joints on the back legs.

    Watch the debut episode of season 2 now and pre-order these amazing toys directly at Target.com!

    We’re so excited to bring another season of exclusive reveals to the Jurassic fandom! Beyond The Gates will continue with monthly episode and will feature more items from the Hammond Collection, the Legacy Collection and of course, the upcoming Jurassic World: Dominion.

    The next episode launches February 16th with an exclusive Legacy Collection set you won’t want to miss! Stay tuned.

    About Jurassic World:
    From Universal Pictures and Amblin Entertainment, Jurassic World immerses audiences of all ages in a new era of wonder and thrills where dinosaurs and humankind must learn to coexist. Jurassic World is set against a global backdrop of diverse locations, with a sprawling story grounded in believable science and populated by distinctive dinosaurs, heroic humans, and cunning villains at both ends of the evolutionary spectrum.

    About Beyond The Gates:
    Created in partnership with Universal Pictures, Amblin Entertainment, Target, and Mattel, Beyond The Gates is produced by Outpost Creative, LLC which was founded by Chris Pugh and Jack De La Mare in late 2020. This show represents a unique partnership between many parties which has allowed for a true Jurassic Park passion project made for the fans, by the fans.

    Jurassic World Evolution 2 Review

    The Park is Open – again

    It’s been over 3 years since the original Jurassic World Evolution released on consoles and PC, and the anticipated sequel delivers on the promise of Fallen Kingdom: we’re not on an island anymore (except when we are, but more on that later).

    Jurassic World Evolution 2 offers some new updates to the established gameplay from the first title, but will also be immediately familiar to players of the first – perhaps too familiar at times. However, for those unfamiliar with Evolution, it is a park building and management game where you’re tasked with creating your very own Jurassic worlds.

    The core gameplay loop in Jurassic World Evolution 2 is all about building park attractions with key operation and exhibition facilities, seeing to guest and animal comfort, all while making sure you remain profitable and don’t run out of money. As you may expect, things don’t always go to plan, and chaos will come into play – from natural disasters like tornadoes and blizzards, dinosaurs growing distressed by their health and needs, and occasionally, dinosaurs breaking free and eating your guests (which is a very quick way to run out of funds).

    You can help avoid unhappy dinosaurs trying to escape by making sure you’ve crafted an enclosure meeting their environmental needs, such as making sure you’ve grown the correct prehistoric flora for herbivores to feed upon, have enough water, open space, and other factors such as making sure species cohabitating a particular enclosure actually like one another.

    If your dinosaurs break free you’ll need to send in ranger teams to round up the ramping threats before they cause too much mayhem, so it’s important to have them placed close by. While this may be easy in the early stages of your park, it becomes more of a challenge as your park grows and is something that will greatly affect your ability to mitigate the collapse of your park – especially as some maps are quite restrictive in size (but fret not, others are quite large).

    Likewise, you’ll want to make sure you’ve researched the best facilities to contain and care for your dinos – such as the new medical center for taking care of sick and injured dinosaurs. As sick dinosaurs can die or spread illness, you’ll want to make sure your mobile veterinary teams can access the species as quickly as possible.

    Research is integral to keeping your park well managed and profitable, and will also provide you the means to train your scientists whomst are integral to the core game mechanics. Scientists are hired staff required to be assigned to all management tasks such as aforementioned research, expeditions for fossils and dinosaurs, DNA synthesis, and egg incubation. 

    Each scientist has three skill categories with associated levels: logistics, genetics, and welfare. The various management tasks, such as sending out a team to look for fossils, have required skills in the category or categories, therefore making sure your various staff are properly leveraged for the tasks ahead is crucial. Likewise, each scientist has a specific perk. Some simply have a higher stamina rate, meaning you can assign them more tasks in a row without them needing a break from overworking, while others may allow for things such as 50% cheaper DNA synthesis or 30% faster egg incubation. You’ll have to make hard choices to make sure you’re saving as much money and time as possible while having enough skill points for the tasks your park requires, and this staff system brings a lot of strategy into the game.

    As I mentioned before, the staff can get overworked and require rest. If you’re not careful, the scientists may become disgruntled, causing setbacks in your park such as sabotage. These new functionalities make the gameplay more dynamic as you expand your park, requiring more strategy in your choices as opposed to only arbitrary wait times while tasks complete.

    The way you edit the environment is far more dynamic than the first game. For example, herbivores no longer have feeders and rather require the proper plant life to support their diets. While some may feed off of ground fiber and nuts, others will feed off tall leaves. With limited space in each paddock for what you can grow, you need to be mindful about the species you place together so their dietary and general comfort needs (which include things like open space, the amount of rocks, and more) can sync up.

    Then, of course, there are the park guests – the people you want to keep happy to fund your dino-park escapades. Their comfort in the park boils down to amenities such as food, shopping, and restrooms, the placement of emergency bunkers, transportation, and of course attractions. Your star attractions are the dinosaurs, and you want to make sure you have the other desired amenities in close proximity to them. Viewing galleries are a primary way for guests to see dinosaurs, and the placement of the galleries is key to make sure the guests actually have sight-lines on the various species. Guests also don’t like to travel too much by foot, so researching and placing structures such as hotels and monorail stations around your focal dino-hubs really helps maximize the success of your park.

    Each level features different environmental locations with different sizes and shapes, sometimes including narrow choke points where building and movement will be restricted. Making smart use of that space to fit all the needed structures, pathways, and dinosaur paddocks is crucial. If you’re not careful, you can easily build yourself into a corner where the needed facilities cannot fit. This will affect profit, guest comfort, and your ability to properly care for the dinosaurs – this can become even worse if disaster strikes.

    Another great feature is the ability to pause time and assess a situation while assigning tasks within the park or choosing building placements. When a park is large, a lot can happen at once, and this feature allows you to manage many occurrences simultaneously before resuming the action and letting your choices play out. Likewise, you can speed up time by 2 and 3 times, allowing for tasks to complete in a blink of an eye. Be careful though – if things start going wrong, every second counts.

    While many of these elements existed in the first Jurassic World Evolution, there are many small quality of life adjustments across the board which make the gameplay more dynamic, and in theory, more fun.

    Unlike the first game, Evolution 2 offers 4 different modes of play: Campaign, Chaos Theory, Challenge Mode, and Sandbox.

    Campaign mode picks up after the events of Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom, with dinosaurs now free in the mainland across various wilds in the US and elsewhere. The story picks up with Owen Grady and Claire Dearing now employed by the United States Department of Fish and Wildlife (DFW) working to help humans and dinosaurs successfully co-exist. The United States Government is concerned by the potential threat dinosaurs pose, and have set up many departments to help keep a close eye on the dinos. These include the DFW and another key player: the newly formed Dangerous Species Division (DSD) of the CIA. While the DFW and DSD cooperate together, there is some tension and distrust between the government agencies, particularly as the CIA isn’t the most forthcoming about their activities with dinosaurs outside of those the DFW directly assist with.

    The single player mode marks the largest departure from Jurassic World Evolution and frankly even Evolution 2’s core gameplay mechanics. Rather than building parks, worrying about guest comfort, and profits, you’re simply tasked with tracking down nuisance dinosaurs and containing, observing, and relocating them – just as normal, non-prehistoric nuisance animals are often dealt with.

    As such, the levels are divided into distinct playspaces within each map: the “buildable area” for creating and maintaining the DFW’s facilities and the “wild area”. The wild area consists of large expanses of wilderness where you cannot build but can take direct control of ranger teams to drive and fly across, tracking down dinosaurs, capturing them, and bringing them back to your containment facility that you build. Primarily you will build simple operation facilities such as paleo veterinary centers, paddocks, and observation platforms for the DFW to study the dinosaurs. Essentially, you want to make sure you have the right size paddock with the right terrain inside for the dinosaurs’ comfort, and once you’ve done that, you’ve got nothing else to worry about.

    As such, you wont utilize most of the game’s core gameplay features and building options in the single player which, quite frankly, is a bizarre choice in a park building and management game. In fact, the the entire single player feels like a short, snappy narrative driven tutorial for a larger game that Frontier forgot to include. The story ends abruptly, only running a few hours, with a narrative that feels like it’s just setting up the first act. While the campaign of the first Jurassic World Evolution admittedly could drag, it was much larger and felt more content complete. The sequel’s main story can be beat faster than it takes to achieve a 5-star rating on some of the challenge mode locations.

    It truly feels like rather than adjust the story to account for the fact that Jurassic World Dominion was delayed, they kept the initial set up and cut the rest of campaign that would intersect too closely with the upcoming film. The story makes mention of a third party and unknown location (seemingly alluding to BioSyn), and it seems like things are just getting ready to explore that thread when the credits role unceremoniously.

    If you’re a player more interested in the narrative single player campaign be warned: campaign feels more like a small expansion to the first game rather than a standalone sequel experience. While the new environments are gorgeous, you won’t spend much time in them within the context of campaign. Some levels, such as Pennsylvania’s beautiful Appalachians, aren’t even featured in the various sandbox and challenge modes.

    Chaos Theory mode feels like a secondary campaign, only smaller in story scope. It does offer some expanded narrative “what if” situations which are introduced with absolutely stunning intro cut-scenes narrated by Jeff Goldblum, reprising his role of Ian Malcolm (though he sometimes sounds less like Malcolm and goes into his weird and whimsical Goldblum voice). Each level is its own standalone story with simple premises attributed to the five films: build and open Jurassic Park successfully for the first film, Build and open Jurassic Park San Diego successfully for The Lost World, Create Jurassic World and successfully remain open with the Indominus Rex for the fourth movie. However, all of those quickly become repetitive gameplay with less narrative threads as your task is simply to achieve a 5-star rating with certain arbitrary chore-like challenges thrown at you along the way. This mode is hit and miss, particularly as it limits player freedom and can quickly become a little too chaotic if you make one wrong move. Personally, I found the San Diego level to be more engaging than the other two which just felt like they dragged on too long. I’m pretty sure I spent more time on Jurassic World’s Chaos Theory level than I did the main campaign – most of my star dinosaurs dying of old age before I cleared the level.

    The issue in Chaos Theory mode is that it mostly assumes you understand the intricacies of park building and management. While it does introduce you to some basics, they’re not enough to realize the long road you have ahead to reach 5-stars. The mode may have felt like less of a chore had the main campaign done more introductory legwork work to introduce the player to the expanded core park management mechanics, but as it stands, the average player may find the experience overwhelming. Spending hours on a simple ‘what if’ scenario shouldn’t be a trial by fire to learn the games core mechanics – because if you make too many mistakes, you may be forced to start from scratch.

    Jurassic Park 3 and Fallen Kingdom’s Chaos Theory modes shake up the formula, and while the other three levels may last too long, these two feel too short. Fallen Kingdom’s plot essentially boils down to returning to Nublar sans a volcanic threat, scanning a few dinosaurs, and then using the removal tool to destroy the pre-built park. It’s weird – and not fun.

    Jurassic Park 3 stands out, as it seems to be an actual lore expansion set between the events of Jurassic Park 3 and Jurassic World rather than a “what if”, returning to Isla Sorna to capture dinosaurs and relocate them to Isla Nublar for Jurassic World. This level plays more like the single player where you capture wild dinosaurs and create basic paddocks for their comfort only. As such, it is short, but it is also a fun break with some curious lore implications.

    Challenge mode is where the game really shines and seems to find better balance between pacing, mission structure, and player expression. It features entire suite of gameplay mechanics all with the goal of reaching a 5-star rating in various locations, while contending different challenge modifiers (for example, a level where dinosaurs are more prone to sickness). While this may sound similar to the Chaos Theory mode, you have more freedom and less arbitrary requirements, allowing you to build and respond to the various challenges in the way you personally wish. Likewise, this mode offers the full suite of ways to obtain dinosaurs for your park, including finding them within the map, sending expeditions to find fossils, and occasionally expeditions to capture wild dinosaurs transporting them directly to your park. It’s a shame the game’s more narrative-driven campaigns don’t embrace this wider sandbox of gameplay, as it offers a sense of freedom and diversity critically lacking in the campaign and Chaos Theory.

    That said, much like the first Jurassic World Evolution, the game still lacks a sense of personal freedom to entirely craft a park as you wish with the many facilities and attractions you would come to expect from the films. While the Gyrosphere tour returns, as does a Jurassic Park and World themed vehicle tour, no new rides or dinosaur themed attractions are present – such as the river tour, Pachy arena, or T. rex kingdom. While some of these additions may seem arbitrary, the idea of this game very much revolves around building your own park – and when each park has the same limited suite of options, it quickly becomes repetitive.

    This is an issue the first game suffered from, and by result, it often times felt boring when compared to other park management titles. While this game has some new additions, and thus can be more engaging, many of the changes feel more like lateral moves. This is especially because most of the buildings, features, and dinosaurs are straight out of the first game. In fact, some species featured in the first didn’t even make the cut for the sequel.

    A fun albeit small addition is the ability to customize some buildings, choosing from a few presets like Jurassic Park or Jurassic World styled walls, entrances, and decorative displays – while also being allowed to customize portions of the colors and lights. While this doesn’t effect gameplay, it does give the player more forms of expression. Although most of it is hard to notice while properly playing the game in its birds eye view.

    Some of the buildings you would expect to have alternative models and skins from various eras – such as the aviary or paddock fencing – sadly do not. And while you can choose skins for your vehicles, including the pre-order and deluxe addition bonuses, in sandbox mode you cannot freely choose any skin. If you want Jurassic World-themed ranger teams, you have to choose that building style for the ranger station, and vice versa for Jurassic Park, only allowing for the bonus skins to be freely swapped in. Curiously, the DFW vehicles from campaign seem to be absent.

    The ability to genetically modify your dinosaur returns allows you to adjust things like their temperament, lifespan, and of course, how they look. Each species has a variety of skins – imagine them as basic color presets and patterns. You can apply a pattern to a skin to bring out more complexity, usually resulting more contrasting colors and striping. Sadly, like the first game, you cannot actually preview the skins to know what they create and there is no proper database for all the varieties of species designs in-game.

    Some of the legacy dinosaur designs also appear as skins, and they also can result in model changes. These include the Tyrannosaurs with skins from all 3 Jurassic Park films, Parasaurolophus from the two sequels, Velociraptors from all three films, the Brachiosaurs from both Jurassic Park and JP3, Stegosaurs, Triceratops, and more. Some legacy species don’t have skin that directly calls out the film its from – such as Spinosaurus, Dilophosaurus or Pachycephalosaurs – yet they do have film accurate colors achievable by choosing the correct generic skin/pattern combos. Just good luck figuring that out on your first try.

    While some dinosaurs are incredibly accurate and offer a fantastic look at their film counterparts, others are lacking or have issues. For instance, Jurassic Park 3 female raptors have great colors, yet sport the quills of the males. The Allosaurus retains its look from the first game, which predates Battle at Big Rock and does not reflect Fallen Kingdom either. This means it’s an entirely canon on-screen species with entirely fictional in-game design. The Pteranodons do not have their Lost World or JP3 skin/models, and sadly the Mamenchisaurus does not reflect its design from the The Lost World which was recently shown in better detail for the first time.

    The aviaries are engaging and the flying reptiles can escape from them wreaking havoc on your park – however they don’t offer much in the terms of customization, theming, or shape. The species list is on the small side, but does include the Jurassic World Pteranodons and Dimorphodons. Sadly the Dimorphodons lack the fuzzy filaments called pycnofibres that they sport in the films.

    The ability to build lagoons and breed marine reptiles also makes its debut, but these facilities have even fewer customizations and gameplay options.

    Despite the various frustrating inaccuracies, when the game looks good, it looks fantastic. However, it’s not always firing on all cylinders in the art department or engine performance. While some levels look gorgeous, with the environments looking rich, realistic, and detailed, others have a decidedly dated and lower detailed look which effects visual readability. The same could be said for the dinosaurs. While some species are so detailed you can see each scale and bump in crisp detail up close, others look waxy with muddier textures. That said, as the game is often played at distance from the dinosaurs, the animation, lighting and environments are what really make or breaks the visual experience.

    The game suffers from some noticeable draw distance pop-in, especially with shadows which just blip in and out of existence – which can be very distracting. Likewise, lighting effects turn off and on at various distances, and while that may not be obvious when hovering in one location, as you pan across your park it jumps out more and more. This is very obvious while in “capture mode” which turns off the hud and gives you more cinematic control over the camera.

    I played the game on the Xbox Series X, one of the most powerful home consoles out there, and these issues were immediately obvious. While I didn’t play the game on the less powerful Xbox One or PS4, I imagine they’re even more notable. Which brings me to the other, more important point: performance.

    When things really get going this game struggles, with huge frame hitches as you zoom in and out or pan over particularly complex areas. Again, I can only guess how it runs on the less powerful machines, but it feels like a certain layer of optimization and polish is missing – further illustrated by the numerous crashes I experienced while playing. Thankfully, autosave meant not much progress was lost, although I do recommend saving frequently.

    The game also suffers from frequent bugs, and while most are minor and don’t impact the game some can lead to frustrating results. Sometimes dinosaurs can become stuck in place – they attempt to move, making flying or walking motions, but they go nowhere. This leads to them slowly dying from starvation and dehydration. At the very least, that can sometimes be fixed by tranquilizing the dinosaur and relocating them. However, it’s not always that easy in an aviary as you can’t exact direct control over the task. You have to let the AI do it by deploying a drone into the aviary, and guess what: the drone can become stuck. There is no easy fix for that – I found myself destroying aviary hatcheries and rebuilding them simply to allow for a new drone that hopefully doesn’t get stuck. Unfortunately this issue popped up frequently, enough to deter me from flying reptiles in the more difficult challenge modes if possible.

    With so few changes from the first game, a shockingly short and simple campaign mode, and the various performance issues I can’t help but feel this game was rushed and surely could have benefited from a delay to release alongside Jurassic World Dominion – if not further out. I also have no doubt content was removed from the game due to the films delay – I suspect it will be released next June alongside the upcoming sequel – but this sadly contributes to what feels like an incomplete package.

    Don’t get me wrong, the game can be fun, but much like the first it has the foundations of a decent park management simulation without the much needed finer level of control, freedom, and variety. The gameplay can be repetitive and oftentimes doesn’t feel rewarding. While the dinosaurs do have more behaviors this time, such as pack hunting, they’re essentially just pretty looking props to challenge you that you can’t really appreciate outside of sandbox mode – where you can turn off disasters, have unlimited cash, and can get up close taking your time without concern of park collapse. Even there, there’s not much to do with the dinos if you’re not interested in building environments and then using capture mode to grab cinematic footage of them. I just can’t help but feel there is some core gameplay element lacking here that would make it all more worth it.

    While this game isn’t bad – it’s also not great. I suspect it will find its real home with modders and content creators, but the average player likely won’t entirely get what they’re looking for. Likewise, park management fans may find the gameplay more shallow than they’re used to. This was easier to forgive with the first Jurassic World Evolution, but it’s doubly frustrating with the sequel, which seems more interested in re-skinning the first game than offering a proper evolution and improvement. While I do believe Jurassic-fans will find something they enjoy in this game, if you don’t mind waiting a little, I recommend waiting for it to go on sale. 

    I can’t imagine it will take too long.

    Jurassic World’s APATOSAURUS Revealed in ‘Beyond The Gates’ Penultimate Episode!

    Today we reach the penultimate episode of our collectors focused web-series Beyond The Gates. We have had such a blast piecing together interviews from the incredibly talented designers behind these toys, along with behind the scenes design sheets and assets that provide an even deeper look at Mattel’s design process.

    Last month we debuted the long-awaited Dr. Alan Grant Amber Collection figure, and the dinosaur of his dreams: the Jurassic Park 3 Isla Sorna Male Velociraptor!

    This month, and what marks the second to last episode, we are excited to debut the dinosaur that made Claire Dearing realise that her “assets” were more than just that… the monstrously sized Apatosaurus!

    In this episode, we hear from the legendary Mattel Jurassic World Designer Rafael Bencosme who talks us through the process of designing such a large toy, and how the previously released Jurassic Park Brachiosaurus influenced the design!

    This Legacy Collection item is sure to make an impression on your collection and will feel right at home on your shelf utterly dominating the space.

    Will you be adding the Jurassic World Apatosaurus to your collection? You can head to Target.com now to pre-order these two items!

    We really hope you have enjoyed Beyond The Gates! We are reaching the final episode and want to thank you for coming on this journey with us! Stay tuned next month for an exclusive item for all generations of Jurassic…

    Colin Trevorrow Confirms ‘Camp Cretaceous’ Has Connections With ‘Dominion’

    SPOILER ALERT: If you haven’t watched Season 3 of ‘Jurassic World: Camp Cretaceous’ yet, do yourself a favor and get on it! In this writer’s opinion it is the best, and darkest, season of the show yet!

    Season 3 of ‘Camp Cretaceous’ has a lot going on: island escape attempts, fun callbacks at the Visitor Center of ‘Jurassic Park’, and the scary scene-stealing poisonous hybrid Scorpious Rex (also known as E750). The kids that were left behind during Isla Nublar’s second breakout, thanks to the Indominus Rex, spent 6 months on the island before finally getting off the shores. Presumably they are off the island for good, but who knows where they will end up or return to?

    Right before their departure, the kids have an unfortunate clash with the same team that was sent by Eli Mills (a rather untrustworthy man who would eventually steal dinosaurs out from under Benjamin Lockwood’s nose and sell them in an auction) to retrieve genetic information from the Indominus Rex so Dr. Henry Wu can create a new hybrid: the Indoraptor. This connects the series directly, not just to ‘Jurassic World’, but to its first sequel ‘Fallen Kingdom’.

    Entertainment Weekly shared a conversation they had with showrunner Scott Kreamer and executive producer Colin Trevorrow (co-writer & director of ‘Jurassic World’), where Trevorrow explains:

    “They’re on this island and, at a certain point, it seems as if they’ve been there for this indeterminate amount of time. To make clear, first of all, what the timeline was at the beginning of ‘Fallen Kingdom’ — it was about six months after the fall of ‘Jurassic World’ — for kids who’ve grown up on it, it’s cool to allow them to connect to these touchstones in the story and recognize that the story we’re telling is part of the larger story. It’s not just some cartoon show for kids…”

    ‘Camp Cretaceous’ reveals that a lot more was going on at the island during the incredible opening sequence of ‘Fallen Kingdom’. After the kids are forced back ashore by part of the same team sent by Mills, about half of them are rushed on board a helicopter until our lady T-rex charges in and chomps on an unsuspecting mercenary. The helicopter takes off prematurely due to the attack, leaving behind the other half of the kids to fend for themselves. This sends the helpless kids on a chase through the jungle, until the T-rex is distracted by the same helicopter we see in ‘Fallen Kingdom’ near the Mosasaur Lagoon. We watch from the perspective of the kids as the event plays out, with their reaction to the Mosasaur chomping on the guy at the last moment mimicking how many had felt when they saw it on theater screens in 2018.

    It doesn’t stop there. Entertainment Weekly’s article continues with additional anecdotes regarding Dr. Wu’s return to the island with a group of mercenaries and more. However, the most interesting details are about how this series ties into what lies ahead for ‘Dominion’, the second upcoming ‘Jurassic World’ sequel. Trevorrow explains:

    “There are connections that we’re making for sure […] When you see ‘Dominion’, it will be clear that it takes place on the same timeline and in the same world as our show.”

    This admission certainly makes ‘Camp Cretaceous’ much more of an important show than many may have guessed. While some can argue until the skies are gray that it is only “soft canon”, this is still an incredibly entertaining way to tie in new elements of the same story that we would have never gotten otherwise.

    Trevorrow continues further, expressing just how mapped out the story for ‘Camp Cretaceous’ is:

    “We do have a beginning, middle, and an end for it […] I certainly wouldn’t want anyone to think that we don’t have a plan. We do, and there is an ending in sight.”

    Given that ‘Dominion’ has already finished filming, and the story for this television series is already set, it would appear that there will certainly be many more connections ahead that will blend the stories of the film and the show into one (hopefully) coherent whole. Everyone here at Jurassic Outpost are certainly looking forward to it.

    Are you excited for more ‘Camp Cretaceous’? Do you like how the show continues to connect to the films? Let us know in the comments below, and as always, stay tuned to Jurassic Outpost for more!

    New World: A Jurassic World Fan Film – Watch It Today!

    Filmmaker Dillon Brown and Horror Nerd Productions are releasing a new fan film set in the Jurassic World franchise, and you can watch it now! New World: A Jurassic World Fan Film centers around the dinosaur and human chaos that could follow the events of Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. The logline is as follows:

    “After the events at Lockwood Manor in Northern California, the genetically engineered dinosaurs captured from Isla Nublar are now roaming the world, many of them freely. Adjusting to this new life is difficult, as most places have issued strict guidelines on interacting with the animals, and many communities have even gone on lockdown as a safety precaution. Presented as a series of found-footage smartphone clips, and telling a wraparound story about a rogue videographer who sells dinosaur footage to news outlets, New World: A Jurassic World Fan Film presents a unique look at what our world has become.”

    The film features original dinosaur effects as well as cameos and contributions from members of the Jurassic fan community. It was originally slated to release on April 16, 2021 but was finished early and is available now!

    A note from director Dillon Brown:

    “This entire film was shot using smart phones, and almost all of the effects you see were used by combining free apps on an iPhone. The entire film cost under $40 to make and was done as an experiment in pandemic filmmaking, allowing friends to get together virtually and create a film from a safe distance. Every VFX shot started out on a phone and utilizing free assets online, we were able to create our film. This was an exercise in bringing together the Jurassic Community and is in no way affiliated with the Jurassic World brand beyond a not-for-profit fan film.”

    You can watch the film right now at the link below!

    You can find more of Dillon and Horror Nerd Productions‘ short films and other work here.

    What do you think will happen in the world following the events of Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom? Check out New World: A Jurassic World Fan Film and let us know what you think below!

    Introducing ‘Jurassic World Beyond the Gates’ – Live Now on Target.com!

    Something is coming, and we couldn’t be more thrilled to share it with you! Jack De La Mare and I have been hard at work on an exciting partnership with Jurassic World and Target to bring you Beyond the Gates – a new collectors focused web-series where we will be revealing all new Jurassic products, while digging into the DNA that brought the items to life. 

    Not too long ago Universal began discussions about this unique collaboration, and we hit the ground running to help design a show format that we hope excites you as much as it does us, from the fans for the fans. Our friends at Universal, Mattel, and Target shared our excitement and helped support us every step along the way as we began to play in this expansive Jurassic toybox, creating this little show. 

    We were given the keys, and a chance to not only to take the Jeep and drive – but to custom design it from the ground up. We worked with a handful of talented artists – including  Lukas Vagt, Matt Henderson and Caleb Burnett – to support hatching the series, and evolve Beyond The Gates from concept to reality. This collaborative process has been a dream, and every party involved has been crucial in bringing this vision to life. 

    Today (February 17th) the first episode of Beyond the Gates made its debut exclusively on Target.com, with subsequent episodes to follow the third week of every month. Every episode feature your first look at all-new, upcoming Jurassic World reveals – and upon their reveal, they will become available for pre-order directly at Target.com. 

    Universal and ourselves not only want to use Beyond the Gates to share exclusive official content, but also to better inform the fans and collectors what is coming, when it will be available, while giving them a reliable way to secure those items for their collection before those opportunities go extinct. On top of that, we wanted to use this opportunity to let you hear directly from the masterminds who helped design the toys while taking a look at the development and evolution of the items via concept art,  prototypes, and more! 

    The first episode of Beyond the Gates is here, and features a look at two long anticipated Amber Collection dinosaurs from the original Jurassic  Park trilogy, accompanied by the expertise of Mattel’s own Chandra Hicks.

    Watch now at Target.com!

    If you’ve seen episode 1, and are looking for our ‘After Show‘ — stay tuned! We’ve hit the ground running on this project, and that one is coming in hot. As for what to expect, we’ll take a longer look at the Amber Collection reveals, hear more from Mattel’s Chandra Hicks, while showing off more concept art and early looks at the development of these toys!

    We wanted to thank Universal Pictures for being so accommodating and entrusting us to help create this fan-focused show. We have so much more to come, and can’t wait  to show you more of what waits BEYOND THE GATES.

    ‘Jurassic World: Aftermath’ Out Now on Oculus VR Platforms (and We’ve Been Playing It)!

    At long last, a Jurassic World game that is not mobile-exclusive or a park builder has arrived! ‘Jurassic World: Aftermath’ is an immersive VR survival adventure game hitting platforms like the recently released Oculus Quest 2, featuring plenty of Dino-action, and compelling storytelling.

    Check out the launch trailer below!

    We’ve been playing this game the last couple of days, and will have plenty of exciting content hitting our YouTube channel soon – but until then, here are some of the basics you need to know:

    ‘Jurassic World: Aftermath’ is set 2 years after the events of Jurassic World, prior to events of Fallen Kingdom. You play as Sam, a voiceless protagonist serving as an avatar to the players, who was hired for an illegal asset retrieval mission on Isla Nublar. You were hired by Dr. Mia Everett, an ex Jurassic World geneticist who worked under Dr. Henry Wu. Everett accompanies you to the island and watches your every move via a body camera, all while speaking to and advising you as you explore (think Halo’s Cortana to Master Chief – only if the Chiefs main talent was hacking computers, and hiding in storage lockers).

    Dr. Everett’s past with Dr. Wu comes into play throughout the story, as their time working at the park was mired with admiration, tension, and spite. Working on the Velociraptor genetics program together, they eventually butted heads and had a falling out – which could mean life or death on the island as Everett tries to salvage the mysterious operation, and figure out just who she can call for help.

    This game is lore rich, with fantastic voice acting by Laura Bailey (Everett), BD Wong (Wu), and Jeff Goldblum (Malcolm). The story has everything to do with Velociraptors, and there is a lot to discover within – including some reveals that may have relevance in 2022’s Jurassic World Dominion. There is a lot to unpack there, and we will have more in-depth coverage soon!

    The gameplay is focused on navigating the facilities (including the canonically important, and expanded universe favorite Geothermal Power Plant), getting certain system back online to unlock doors, access computers, and try to survive – all while dodging three Velociraptors. If you’re wondering where these new raptors came from, why they look different, and why they behave differently, worry not – the game has compelling answers for all those questions within the story.

    This game has zero combat elements: your tool is your wit, using computer systems to distract the raptors as you crawl through vents, take cover behind tables, or hide within lockers all while hacking into computer systems, or looking for items needed to progress. You also have a flashlight, which you can use to spook the occasional Dilophosaurus, which will try ambush you from ventilation openings. All of this leads to exciting ‘raptors in the kitchen’ like moments of cat and mouse tactics, much like Alien Isolation at a smaller scale and budget.

    While this games budget is notably smaller, the voice acting is top tier, as is the music. The story is incredibly compelling – and certainly seems to be canon – but shorter, and clearly episodic, with an expansion coming in 2021. The cel shaded visuals looks crisp, though I really can’t help but wonder if a more realistic style would have been better positioned for the VR format. After-all, it’s all about breaking the confines of a screen and bringing that world to life for the player. Thankfully, the gameplay is well polished, and that’s what really matters.

    If you have a VR capable device, or are planning to pick something like the Oculus Quest 2 already, this game is not to be missed for Jurassic story fans (Side bar: also pick up Vader Immortal and SuperHot — they really are must-haves for the VR platform. They made me a believer.). If you’re waiting for more information, fair play as well! Be sure to stay tuned to Jurassic Outpost, where we will have in-depth video coverage coming, including a Quest 2 unboxing, lore videos, and a formal review in the days to come!