Insight Editions “Jurassic Park Visual History” Book Is Released, But Is It “Ultimate”?

For years, fans of ‘Jurassic Park’ have wanted an art book of the franchise’s original three films. While we have had wonderful “making of” books for both ‘Jurassic Park’ and ‘The Lost World: Jurassic Park’ since the films were released, there was only so many of the thousands of production artwork that could have been displayed. ‘Jurassic Park 3’ never even got any form of a “behind the scenes” book at all.

Insight Editions has a new book that claims to change all of that, with “Jurassic Park: The Ultimate Visual History“. They describe it as:

The most comprehensive book about the Jurassic Park trilogy to date, Jurassic Park: The Ultimate Visual History begins with an in-depth account of the making of Spielberg’s original film, including rare and never-before-seen imagery and exclusive interviews with key creatives. Readers will then unearth the full history of the trilogy, from The Lost World: Jurassic Park to Jurassic Park III, through unprecedented access to the creative process behind the films. Fans will also find a fascinating look at the wider world of the saga, including video games, toys, comics, and more, exploring the lasting legacy of the movies and their influence on pop culture.

But after all this time, is this new book truly the “ultimate visual history”? Unfortunately, it’s not; but it is a good attempt with some beautiful new images and information thanks to the “key creatives” from the film’s production.

WHAT’S GOOD?

VISUAL STYLE

The book is visually pleasing, featuring Jurassic-inspired borders around the pages, filling them up with as much colorful artwork and photographs as they can. The text is neatly placed within it all, and nothing ever feels too crammed or out of place.

EXCLUSIVE INTROS/OUTROS FROM THE ORIGINAL TRIO

Sam Neil, Laura Dern, and Jeff Goldblum each get their very own pages in the book to speak about the franchise from their own words. This is a nice personal touch to the book that fans will love. For example, Laura Dern recounts:

My favorite memory is going to the Amblin offices to watch Jurassic Park for the first time. We were in this small screening room, and it was just me, Steven, Jeff, and Sam. Steven’s assistant very kindly brought us popcorn, the lights went down, and we watched our movie. It’s a beautiful thing to see a movie with your filmmaker. […] You really feel the beauty of the collaboration, and there is nothing like it. And, in that moment, we realized Steven had made a world none of us had ever seen before—not even in our wildest dreams. The four of us were screaming and crying. It’s one of the great memories of my life, and to be able to share in the magic he created was really incredible.

NEW IMAGES

As hoped for, there are some never-before-seen illustrations, and some that are seen in better quality than in the past. Across the board, ‘Jurassic Park”s Art Director John Bell fills this book with amazing artwork for all 3 films (most were recently seen in advance on his website). One of the new illustrations is of Dennis Nedry in his Jeep, driving during the storm toward the East Dock, thwarted by crashed machinery that blocks his path.

Storyboard Artist David Lowery also provides several new storyboards from all 3 films, including little Benjamin’s point of view in his San Diego house when the T-Rex arrives (complete with an E.T. toy reference that didn’t make it into the film, but later would in ‘Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom’).

NEW INFORMATION

While many stories do get recounted to drive a narrative for the book, there are plenty of bits of new information thanks to new interviews.

For ‘Jurassic Park’, several details are revealed: Spielberg’s infatuation with dinosaurs as a kid thanks to museum exhibits, lowering the budget was the reason the baby Triceratops scene was ultimately cut, John Williams expresses his delight writing the music for the Raptors, and even Spielberg’s take on there suddenly being a drop in the T-rex paddock: There’s a T. rex [there]! [The audience isn’t] gonna notice anything else but that!. There is also mention of how Ian Malcolm was almost cut from the film, more than once, until Jeff Goldblum auditioned for the role:

Reading lines from the novel, Goldblum, known for playing a brilliant yet troubled scientist in The Fly (1986), immediately captured Malcolm’s essence. “I watched the tape with Steven and we just went, ‘Yes!’” says Hirshenson. Jim Carrey, a few years away from his breakthrough role in 1994’s The Mask, also tried out for the part and made a strong impression. But Hirshenson instinctively knew Goldblum was perfect for Malcolm: “He just has a persona and speech pattern like nobody else . . . such a wonderful oddball!” Goldblum’s take on Malcolm was so compelling that it convinced Spielberg to keep the character. Recalls Koepp: “Steven said, ‘I know why you want to cut him. But Jeff Goldblum came in and was just reading from the book, and he was so good.’” With the actor’s distinct vocal patterns in mind, the character finally clicked for Koepp, and he wrote Malcolm back into the script: “Once I started picturing Jeff, it was easy. He’s such a distinctive actor. He was perfect for the part.”

For ‘The Lost World’, Spielberg reveals how he originally was going to do a third film where dinosaurs got off the island until he realized he likely wouldn’t do another one, which was a big reason why the climax of ‘The Lost World’ changed to San Diego’s T-Rex rampage. There is also a brief mention of why Kelly became Malcolm’s daughter instead of a student, like she was in the novel: to mirror the protection of the T-Rex’s offspring with that of Malcolm’s. But perhaps the most interesting new detail is that screenwriter David Koepp directed some second unit footage for the film, which shaped how one sequence played out due to a circumstance:

After Spielberg and the main crew returned to LA, David Koepp stayed in Kaua‘i to direct the second unit, principally shooting an early sequence where a chartered boat ferries Malcolm, Van Owen, and Carr to the island. “It was supposed to be a sequence of them landing the boat,” says Koepp. “People and equipment pour off the boat, and they have this conversation on the beach.” But on the day of the shoot, the tide changed and the boat they were filming on got stuck on a sandbar. Panicked, Koepp called Spielberg. “I remember Steven was on a plane, and I was talking to him, saying, ‘We’re stuck on a sandbar. I can’t do the landing.’ And he said, ‘Oh . . . what are you gonna do?’” On the spot, Koepp reshaped the scene so that the captain of the ship refuses to go further upriver, spooked by stories of fishermen disappearing near the island: “I kind of rewrote it on the boat as we were all sitting there.”

JURASSIC PARK 3′

As mentioned, ‘Jurassic Park 3’ never had a behind-the-scenes book before; so that automatically gives this book a major bonus point. While some stories and quotes are lifted directly from other sources over the years (more on that later), to finally have a compilation of the film’s history is praise alone. Unlike the old DVD bonus features, the book takes a more honest look at the film’s troubled history involving its script. In fact, David Lowery recounts how there was even a contest involved with coming up with the film’s opening sequence:

They had a contest: Who could come up with the best opening? We all pitched some version. Nobody won the contest, which was kind of a bummer.”

The compilation of information is joined by a myriad of artwork, both new and old, which is all incredible to see finally cobbled together.

FOCUS ON SCRIPTS

While touched upon in the prior books made for ‘Jurassic Park’ and ‘The Lost World’, this time there is a greater focus on the scriptwriting process of the film. David Koepp usually chimes in with commentary on his drafts, making the process that much more interesting to delve into. Several different drafts, in different stages, get summarized in this book for all three films, although there is one omission that is a bit puzzling (more on that later, as well).

THE INSERTS

One of the biggest standouts for the book are its various inserts, which is a staple of Insight Editions books. There are some replica prop designs throughout that are fun (but with some issues, that you will see below), beautiful character design illustrations for ‘The Lost World’, various selections of never-before-seen storyboards, a blueprint, and a lot more.

WHAT’S NOT SO GOOD?

THE INSERTS

The inserts are often held with an adhesive that will unfortunately leave a permanent stain on some items, whether they are removed or not.

INACCURACIES

Unfortunately, this book has inaccuracies. Some leeway must be given with the nearly 3 decades since the original film came out, for example, but there are some errors that easily would have been spotted by a fan if seen in advance. For example, it is mentioned that “Hasbro brought its relationship with Jurassic Park to an end in 2005“, which is not accurate at all. ‘Jurassic Park’ toys from the company continued in 2006, 2009, and 2013. Let alone 2015, when it took on the toys for ‘Jurassic World’ (though to be fair, one could say that is no longer ‘Jurassic Park’). Another flub is that the Stegosaurus animatronic in ‘The Lost World’ is completely out of the film when it can be seen, for multiple shots, in a cage during Sarah and Nick’s sneaking into the Hunter Camp. While it is easy for a writer unfamiliar to the franchise to make these kinds of mistakes, even with research, perhaps it should have been looked at further by people who could have averted this kind of misinformation.

OMISSIONS

While editing a book always involves “cutting the fat” out of its diet, I feel like some things should have been adapted that weren’t. For example, the biggest portion of new artwork comes mostly from John Bell and David Lowery: something NO ONE is complaining about seeing! But a countless number of artists worked on all three films, and it would have been nice to see more variety from some of the lesser-presented talent. There are also some surprising artwork omissions compared to the original books, such as no art at all for the omitted river sequence of ‘Jurassic Park’. Having key sequences like that from the film’s history not even present this time, when it was before, takes the word “ultimate” out of the equation. So don’t you dare throw away your old copies of the “Making Of” books!

This may feel personal, but I am also surprised that the widely documented (and even performed) script arranged by Rick Carter, ‘Jurassic Park”s Production Designer, which featured many storyboards as seen here, was not even brought up. While it may have been obscure or not even referenced in their files, it would have easily shown up online at the time the book was being worked on. Which brings us to…

YOU HAVE THE INTERNET… USE IT

While there is definitely new information in this book, due to whatever access they did have with people and places, it still doesn’t feel like they took full advantage of all opportunities at their disposal. Fan sites that have been around for years could have been courted with the wealth of additional materials they have procured if it wasn’t immediately available to them (many with images in high definition). It has also been known that special collections house materials from the films that could have been accessed for this book. An internet search would have likely picked up on these details easily.

Jurassic Outpost is quoted in this book numerous times for our Shelly Johnson interview, for example. It is clear they were aware of at least some parts of our site… yet we were never contacted. Had we been, and if they had seen our additional articles and interviews, they could have been greatly assisted. While we appreciate being referenced in the book, we were not fully utilized… and to their disadvantage.

THE COVER

The cover features a beautiful illustration by David J. Negrón that was made for the film during pre-production, featuring Grant and the kids being chased by the Tyrannosaurus Rex. It’s a striking image, and easy to see why it was used for the cover. Unfortunately, there is something very WRONG with it. The faces and even the bodies of the three humans have been photoshopped to resemble their film counterparts.

The REAL illustration features how the characters were conceived based on scripts at the time, and gave Grant the likeness of Harrison Ford due to a request that Spielberg made… which is even mentioned in this book:

Spielberg had considered [Harrison] Ford, his Indiana Jones, for the role of Grant. “I had a concept painting made featuring Grant with Timmy and Lex running toward camera, the T. rex in hot pursuit,” he says. Mulling over the possibility of casting his longtime leading man, he asked the artist to paint in Ford’s face and sent it to the actor with a copy of the script. “I know he read the script and he saw the picture,” recalls Spielberg. “And he just said . . . at this point in his life and career, this wasn’t his cup of tea.”

Now, from a marketing perspective it makes sense to perhaps touch up the image to make the characters resemble as they do in the film to better sell their product. However, the big problem here is that the same illustration is featured later in the book… in the same photoshopped form. Worst of all, it credits David J. Negrón only, and has no mention of the alterations or who did them. While it is POSSIBLE David had been contacted to do it himself, this seems rather unlikely. What we have here then is a case of art being misrepresented, and it’s a big issue. It’s like painting a smile on the Mona Lisa.

Also, why not just use another image for the cover that didn’t require any photoshop at all?

IT’S JUST NOT “ULTIMATE”

When it comes down to it, it’s hard to call this book “The Ultimate Visual History” when it isn’t. Is it a beautiful book, loaded with wonderful imagery and with plenty of details and goodies? Yes, it certainly is. Will many fans love it? Definitely. But the criticisms must be pointed out, because if they are not, these kinds of things will just keep happening. Inaccuracies can become facts, omissions can become lost to time, and not taking advantage of materials easily at your disposal is a detriment to the fans for a product like this. This book is good, but it isn’t great; which is truly unfortunate. It comes with a mild recommendation, if you can afford it at its current price point.

If anyone involved with this book sees this article, please don’t take it personally. We are passionate fans who are just passionate about these kinds of products. The Insight Editions Back To The Future book had a revised version; perhaps the same can be done for ‘Jurassic Park’? I hope it happens so these issues can be resolved, at least to some degree.

While we did NOT quite endorse this book, what do you think? If you agree, comment below. If not, don’t bother. Only joking!

The Noble Collection Releases 3 Jurassic Park Dinosaur Figures With Scenic Bases!

Get ready for a set of cool new Nublar figures, thanks to The Noble Collection!

Available now from their website, you can adorn your home with 3 different dinosaur figures from Jurassic Park. Each detailed figure is approx. 7 inches tall and is removeable from a base inspired by a key scene featuring the dinosaur.

First, we have a Dilophosaurus! Frill up, mouth open, ready to spit at our favorite saboteur! Her base is sculpted to resemble the watery, muddy hill that Dennis Nedry crashes onto. While we don’t see the Barbasol can anywhere, the Dilophosaurus clearly makes a beautiful but deadly addition to your collection!

Next, we have a pair of Velociraptors! They are rummaging through a base that resembles the kitchen Tim and Lex were hiding in: complete with a table, pots, pans, and spoons! This terrifying sequence is now finally brought to miniature life! Maybe you’ll include it in your kitchen?

Last, but certainly not least, we have the mighty Tyrannosaurus Rex! Standing in a Visitor Center rotunda base, she is roaring in her classic, victorious pose! The “When Dinosaurs Ruled The Earth” banner is shown falling in front of her during this dramatic scene. The sculpt of the Rex is so detailed that they even included the freshly-produced wounds near her neck, made by the Velociraptors! While Dr. Grant may not have endorsed the park after this scene, we certainly endorse this figure!

As you can see in the image from the Noble Collection catalog above (thanks to jurassic_version4.4), they even look great left in their packaging! Each of these wonderful figures are $35, plus shipping (however they do offer free U.S. domestic shipping if you get all 3, currently!). At the time of this article, they have a shipping estimate of March 2022. I’ve got my credit card standing by in Choteau!

The Noble Collection has long been a maker of quality products based on some of our favorite franchises like Harry Potter, Lord of the Rings, and even Jumanji. They previously produced a unique Jurassic Park Chess Set (showcased by us below), and we hope they continue to create more products for eager fans like us! Now, we just hope there’ll be a coupon day, or something…

We love these figures, but why would we care what WE think? We want to know what YOU think! Let us know in the comments below!

Stern Pinball Releases New Pinball Machine Dedicated To The Original Jurassic Park Trilogy

Now available from Stern Pinball is a brand-new “thunderball” of a pinball machine celebrating the original Jurassic Park trilogy! Featuring hand-drawn artwork on the playfield and Stern’s powerful SPIKE™ high-definition LCD display graphics and animations, this electrical and mechanical marvel can now find its way into your home!

From the press release:

“Jurassic Park Pin immerses players in a pinball journey 65 million years in the making. Based on the blockbuster film Jurassic Park from Universal Pictures and Amblin Entertainment, the Jurassic Park Pin experience will transport players to Isla Nublar, an amusement park where escaped dinosaurs are running amok! With the volcano on the island erupting and threatening to destroy everything in its path, it is the player’s mission to rescue park staff, evacuate and recapture dinosaurs, and escape before it’s too late! Players will experience heart-pounding excitement right from the start in this action-packed pinball adventure filled with suspense, twists, and turns around every flip.

Jurassic Park Pin brings to life the most fearsome predator ever to walk the earth with an interactive, custom sculpted T. rex. Players will battle against the Spinosaurus by bashing a captive ball and corral Raptors in their enclosed pen with precision shooting. Fast flowing metal ramps, lightning quick spinners, and kinetically satisfying physical drop targets will provide players with an adrenalized game experience packed with unmatched action and fun. The all-LED playfield lighting provides dazzling light shows in sync with the iconic Jurassic Park theme music to create an immersive pinball experience.”

 

As seen in the photos, this machine is chock-full of stylized art depicting dinosaurs and other details from the original trilogy. Classic Jurassic Park gates, night vision goggles, Pteranodons, the “When Dinosaurs Ruled The Earth” banner, and even Nedry’s computer featuring his stress toy! Curiously it depicts the Nublar volcano, which is something not introduced until Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. However, Nublar was always depicted as volcanic dating back to the novels and early screenplays, so its inclusion isn’t distracting. While some fans may not like the idea of pairing the Rex and the Spinosaurus on a product that clearly emphasizes Nublar (depicted literally on the machine art), this is meant to be a fun combination of everything that made the original Jurassic Park trilogy great in a vibrant and fun way.

This pinball machine can be yours today for $4,599 USD. While that sounds like a lot, Christmas is around the corner, and I am sure if you ask your parents or loved ones very, very nicely…

For more information and to purchase, visit Stern Pinball today!

Will you be getting this impressive new pinball machine? Or will you wait for “coupon day”? Let us know in the comments below!

‘Jurassic World: Evolution 2’ Announced At Summer Game Fest – Coming in 2021!

This year’s Summer Game Fest kicked off with its virtual live stream to deliver all the exciting announcements on the future of gaming. For ‘Jurassic World’ fans, of course, the big question was: will there be another game related to the franchise? That question was answered when Jeff Goldblum himself announced Frontier’s continuation of their park-building triumph with ‘Jurassic World: Evolution 2’!

Jurassic World: Evolution‘ was released on June 2018 by Frontier Developments, and was a immersive park-building game for the PC and other consoles. With the assistance of characters from the franchise, such as Claire Dearing, Dr. Henry Wu, and Ian Malcolm; players would be tasked with creating and controlling the environments for over 50 dinosaur species. This game was a quick hit with fans, especially when a classic ‘Jurassic Park’-themed DLC hit on December 2019. Ever since that final DLC, fans had been anticipating a sequel to further their creations with new elements.

‘Jurassic World: Evolution 2’ promises not only new locales, themes, and story elements from the upcoming ‘Jurassic World: Dominion’ film but also a much needed expansion on the gameplay!

During Summer Fest, Goldblum dramatically announced the trailer, saying it will “elevate you to new heights”, “submerge you to new depths” and “challenge you to control chaos”. The trailer then played, showcasing pteranodons, brachiosaurs, coelophysis, snow-capped mountains, and a mosasaur! This marks the premiere of water-based prehistoric reptiles for the game!

The official press release explains in great detail the extent of this game’s expansion of what has come before:

“Based on Universal Pictures’ blockbuster film franchise and created in collaboration with Universal Games and Digital Platforms, Jurassic World Evolution 2 builds upon the ground-breaking and beloved 2018 dinosaur park management simulation. It offers players a thrilling front seat as they take charge of one of the greatest theme parks of all time.

With a brand new, immersive narrative campaign voiced by cast members from across the Jurassic World film franchise, exciting new features, four engaging game modes, and an enhanced and expanded roster of dinosaurs, Jurassic World Evolution 2 provides fans with everything they need to create authentic and compelling Jurassic World experiences.

Players will leave the Muertes Archipelago for the first time and build their own authentic Jurassic Worlds across diverse new environments, from dense forests to scorched deserts, in efforts to conserve and contain more than 75 prehistoric species. These include all-new flying and marine reptiles, brought to life with captivating realism. They’ll display brand new behaviours as they interact with each other, fight for dominance, and react intelligently to the world around them.

In Jurassic World Evolution 2, players dive into an original single player campaign featuring iconic film actors reprising their roles. Join Dr. Ian Malcolm (voiced by Jeff Goldblum), and Claire Dearing (voiced by Bryce Dallas Howard) in an immersive and exciting narrative experience set after the Earth-shattering events of Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom.

Chaos Theory mode is another major addition. It offers a reimagined take on pivotal moments from the Jurassic World film franchise as players strive to make their own mark and change the course of events. Elsewhere, for those looking to unleash their creativity, Sandbox mode delivers everything players need to create their perfect Park, while Challenge mode tests their mastery of the game.

Across all modes we’ve dramatically improved our signature management and construction gameplay to give players everything needed to create their ultimate Jurassic Worlds. Whether it’s deeper management tools and creative options, fresh buildings to construct and customise, or handy shortcuts to make life easier, in Jurassic World Evolution 2, players can truly flex their managerial muscle.

Jurassic World Evolution 2 launches in late 2021 on PC, PS5, Xbox Series X|S, PS4, and Xbox One.”

With the continuation of this fantastic park builder, there remains the question of whether or not we will see other game titles released soon. Will there be a continuation of the popular ‘Lego Jurassic World’ game? Or will we finally get a brand-new first-person exploration of the islands, and beyond? Only time, the ever-flowing river, will tell.

Be sure to check out our detailed analysis of the announcement trailer and screenshots below:

Are you excited for this continuation of ‘Jurassic World: Evolution’? Let us know in the comments below, and as always, stay tuned to Jurassic Outpost for more!

Colin Trevorrow Confirms ‘Camp Cretaceous’ Has Connections With ‘Dominion’

SPOILER ALERT: If you haven’t watched Season 3 of ‘Jurassic World: Camp Cretaceous’ yet, do yourself a favor and get on it! In this writer’s opinion it is the best, and darkest, season of the show yet!

Season 3 of ‘Camp Cretaceous’ has a lot going on: island escape attempts, fun callbacks at the Visitor Center of ‘Jurassic Park’, and the scary scene-stealing poisonous hybrid Scorpious Rex (also known as E750). The kids that were left behind during Isla Nublar’s second breakout, thanks to the Indominus Rex, spent 6 months on the island before finally getting off the shores. Presumably they are off the island for good, but who knows where they will end up or return to?

Right before their departure, the kids have an unfortunate clash with the same team that was sent by Eli Mills (a rather untrustworthy man who would eventually steal dinosaurs out from under Benjamin Lockwood’s nose and sell them in an auction) to retrieve genetic information from the Indominus Rex so Dr. Henry Wu can create a new hybrid: the Indoraptor. This connects the series directly, not just to ‘Jurassic World’, but to its first sequel ‘Fallen Kingdom’.

Entertainment Weekly shared a conversation they had with showrunner Scott Kreamer and executive producer Colin Trevorrow (co-writer & director of ‘Jurassic World’), where Trevorrow explains:

“They’re on this island and, at a certain point, it seems as if they’ve been there for this indeterminate amount of time. To make clear, first of all, what the timeline was at the beginning of ‘Fallen Kingdom’ — it was about six months after the fall of ‘Jurassic World’ — for kids who’ve grown up on it, it’s cool to allow them to connect to these touchstones in the story and recognize that the story we’re telling is part of the larger story. It’s not just some cartoon show for kids…”

‘Camp Cretaceous’ reveals that a lot more was going on at the island during the incredible opening sequence of ‘Fallen Kingdom’. After the kids are forced back ashore by part of the same team sent by Mills, about half of them are rushed on board a helicopter until our lady T-rex charges in and chomps on an unsuspecting mercenary. The helicopter takes off prematurely due to the attack, leaving behind the other half of the kids to fend for themselves. This sends the helpless kids on a chase through the jungle, until the T-rex is distracted by the same helicopter we see in ‘Fallen Kingdom’ near the Mosasaur Lagoon. We watch from the perspective of the kids as the event plays out, with their reaction to the Mosasaur chomping on the guy at the last moment mimicking how many had felt when they saw it on theater screens in 2018.

It doesn’t stop there. Entertainment Weekly’s article continues with additional anecdotes regarding Dr. Wu’s return to the island with a group of mercenaries and more. However, the most interesting details are about how this series ties into what lies ahead for ‘Dominion’, the second upcoming ‘Jurassic World’ sequel. Trevorrow explains:

“There are connections that we’re making for sure […] When you see ‘Dominion’, it will be clear that it takes place on the same timeline and in the same world as our show.”

This admission certainly makes ‘Camp Cretaceous’ much more of an important show than many may have guessed. While some can argue until the skies are gray that it is only “soft canon”, this is still an incredibly entertaining way to tie in new elements of the same story that we would have never gotten otherwise.

Trevorrow continues further, expressing just how mapped out the story for ‘Camp Cretaceous’ is:

“We do have a beginning, middle, and an end for it […] I certainly wouldn’t want anyone to think that we don’t have a plan. We do, and there is an ending in sight.”

Given that ‘Dominion’ has already finished filming, and the story for this television series is already set, it would appear that there will certainly be many more connections ahead that will blend the stories of the film and the show into one (hopefully) coherent whole. Everyone here at Jurassic Outpost are certainly looking forward to it.

Are you excited for more ‘Camp Cretaceous’? Do you like how the show continues to connect to the films? Let us know in the comments below, and as always, stay tuned to Jurassic Outpost for more!

Never-Before-Seen Early Concept Video Of The “Raptors In The Kitchen” Sequence From ‘Jurassic Park’!

Ever since ‘Jurassic World’ put a spotlight back on the ‘Jurassic Park’ franchise, things from the productions of the original films that were long buried in the depths of files, folders, and boxes have been unearthed. Scripts, storyboards, original artwork, and now a previously unseen concept video presented by Jurassic Time!

One of the scenes from ‘Jurassic Park’ that the production spent a lot of pre-planning was the famous “Raptors In The Kitchen” sequence near the climax of the film. It went through many variations as evidenced in the scripts, storyboards, and animatics. However, this newly-revealed concept video shows yet another variation on the entire sequence with a key difference that sets it apart from anything previously known.

The concept video (which Jurassic Time has enhanced with resources and added music from the ‘Rick Carter’s Jurassic Park’ score to make it more watchable) begins with a series of storyboards that depict Dr. Alan Grant, Tim, and Lex entering the Visitor Center after they have trekked through the park. And unlike every known version of the sequence, Grant leaves them in the restaurant with a park worker who just happens to still be in there. After Grant leaves to find the others, the worker goes into the kitchen to prepare a meal for the hungry kids.

Previously unseen storyboard of a park worker meeting with Grant and the kids in the Visitor Center.

Shortly after, a raptor’s shadow grazes over a mural against a restaurant wall that features its likeness. The kids retreat into the kitchen to hide. As the raptor approaches the door to the kitchen and opens it, the storyboards change into actual video footage of an unfinished raptor suit worn by John Rosengrant from Stan Winston Studios. He walks into a makeshift version of the kitchen set, using a collection of tables, real items, and even some hand-drawn representations. But he isn’t alone; he is quickly joined by another raptor represented by a life-size cardboard cutout! Together, the two “raptors” stalk Tim and Lex; played by the production’s Art Director John Bell and Art Department Coordinator Caroline Quinn. From here, video footage becomes intermixed with additional storyboards.

Carboard cutout raptor in foreground with raptor suit in background.

Head of the raptor suit looking toward the camera.

Lex (Caroline Quinn) and Tim (John Bell) crawling and hiding from the raptors.

Together, the two “kids” avoid the raptors by crawling around the kitchen floor between the long tables, similar to the final version of the film. However, in this version both kids climb into the cubby that is reflected against the shiny cabinetry (or in this video’s case, an actual mirror is used to sell the idea) as a raptor charges into it instead of them. The kids crawl away once again, but before the raptors can make another move, the park worker enters the kitchen from the pantry where he had been preparing the kids’ meal. The park worker, played by set designer John Berger, sees the raptors and drops the meal.

The park worker (John Berger) emerges from the pantry with the kids’ meal in tow, surprised by the sight of the raptors.

To protect himself and the children from the raptors, the park worker grabs a pair of knives that are nearby. Unfortunately, he is no match for the teeth and claws of the raptors as they both leap on top of him! The kids watch as the park worker is maimed by the vicious dinosaurs, but then take advantage of the distraction to escape from the kitchen. Of course, the raptors spot their exit… and it is only a matter of time before they catch up to them. (It is interesting to note that the freezer is not featured at all in this concept, despite it being used in some form in all the other versions.)

Knives can’t stop the raptors as the park worker meets his demise.

This storyboard/video hybrid was created by the film’s art department for director Steven Spielberg to see. It is unclear exactly when in the production this was made, but a good portion of the storyboards used were from later incarnations of the sequence (while also including some that have never been seen before). The raptor suit used is also unfinished, so this may have also been a concept to show off how it looked in the sequence for feedback on any desired tweaks. It’s also interesting that the pantry was once part of the set, as evidenced by blueprints that have been finding their way online; and this concept of the sequence shows why it was once included.

Section of blueprint featuring where the pantry was, beside the freezer.

Just when a fan, such as I, thinks they know all the production’s ideas that were brought to the table… something like this is found! Whether one agrees with the ideas in this concept or not, it is thrilling to see yet another variation of what could have been in the film. ‘Jurassic Park’ had a monumental production team, and this video proves once again just how free their ideas were allowed to shape the classic film we have today.

Be sure to also check out Jurassic Time‘s illustrated audio drama series, Rick Carter’s Jurassic Park, that explores an entirely different version of the film as envisioned by its production designer!

What do you think of this concept video? Do you think this would have been a better version of the sequence? Just who was this park worker? Share your comments down below!

See An Early Version Of ‘Jurassic Park’ With Concept Art & Storyboards In An EPIC Audio Drama

Experience an early version of ‘JURASSIC PARK’ through production designer Rick Carter’s adaptation of Michael Crichton’s final draft screenplay, brought to life in an entertaining audio drama with visual enhancements!

Watch the entire illustrated audio drama series, plus its introduction and teaser trailer, below.

RICK CARTER’S ‘JURASSIC PARK’ was an epic project born out of the dire 2020 pandemic lockdown. Author Derrick Davis, the creator of JURASSIC TIME and writer at JURASSIC OUTPOST, had acquired many rare and previously unseen selections of concept art, storyboards, scripts, and other materials related to the original ‘Jurassic Park’. One of the most interesting items he acquired was a unique script that had many elements that would eventually be scrapped, but would also shape the final film, and beyond.

The official history behind Jurassic Park’s screenwriting process had always included Michael Crichton, Malia Scotch Marmo, and David Koepp. During this time, the film’s production designer, Rick Carter, took on a bigger role than normal.

“I was brought onto ‘Jurassic Park’ about two years before we finally started shooting […] On most shows, the production designer is brought in and handed a script and asked to visualize it. Not so on this one. I was in on many early meetings with Steven where we would break down the scenes in the book and discuss which ones would work best for the film.”

-Rick Carter

In the beginning, Michael Crichton had provided several drafts of the screenplay for his novel before passing the pen to whoever would take a crack at future drafts. Director Steven Spielberg went on to film ‘HOOK’, as Jurassic Park’s production team continued to work.

“While Spielberg was doing ‘HOOK’, I would go to him with all these different ideas of how to make things work. It was a very managed production.”

-Rick Carter

One of the ways Rick Carter displayed his ideas was by crafting an entirely new script using much of Crichton’s as the backbone.

“After our last script meetings, I began collecting together my notes. I realized that the only way for me to see how the ideas might actually play out in the story was for me to “collage” them into Michael’s latest script. Well, one thing led to another and I found myself going through the entire story.”

-Rick Carter

Out of all the scripts written for ‘Jurassic Park’, Carter’s version is perhaps the most interesting. It includes the early process of making John Hammond a more sympathetic character, the sick triceratops replacing the sick stegosaurus, and other changes from Crichton that will feel more familiar to how the film ended up. At the same time, the script introduces some interesting changes that would not carry over. This includes using the opening of the novel at the Costa Rican clinic, a condensed version of the river sequence, the removal of Donald Gennaro, Hammond’s idea of recruiting Grant and Sattler to work at the park, the discovery of a raptor den secretly nestled far beyond their pen, trees that are deforested by the giant dinosaurs, and the inclusion of lava fields. There’s even an umbrella designed to look like a “spitter” that is used as a distraction against a velociraptor; an idea similarly used in ‘Jurassic World’.

A “spitter” umbrella from the gift shop, used in defense against a velociraptor.

It’s not every day that a production designer writes a screenplay to get his ideas across in order to make the film a success. But Rick Carter was a special production designer. While his version of the script would not end up being used for the film, it wasn’t his intent anyway. He simply wanted the best way to further continue the production progress of ‘Jurassic Park’, and he felt altering the script was the best way to do it.

But what if it had been made? What would it have been like? Would it have felt just as grand, just engaging, and just as memorable? Or would it have had its own unique flavor that no one else could have concocted?

Lava fields that Grant and the kids must traverse through.

After nearly 30 years since it had been written, Derrick Davis had discovered the script and wanted to know the answers to all of those questions. He decided the best way to experience this early version of the film was to bring it to life. This led to him teaming up with another fan of the franchise, music composer Bernard A. Kyer. Derrick presented him with the idea of creating an audio drama experience from the script. He would do this by using concept art, storyboards, and other official artwork to illustrate it; many of which had never been seen before. Bernard took the script and adjusted it to flow in this format, while Derrick went to several fans of ‘Jurassic Park’ that could perform various roles, including himself as Tim Murphy and John Hammond.

One of those fans suggested by Bernard was artist, filmmaker, and actor Joshua Malone; the voice of Ed Regis, Dr. Alan Grant, and Lex Murphy. He also provided the narration for the program’s teaser trailer and further consultation throughout. Other cast members include Jurassic Outpost’s Samantha Endres as Dr. Ellie Sattler, and Caleb Burnett as Dr. Ian Malcolm; as well as designer Casey Wayne Cook, Jr. as Dr. Henry Wu and others.

Within almost a year’s time, Bernard assembled all the character performances while providing the script narration and additional voices, such as Dennis Nedry. The process included mixing a vast library of sound effects, many obtained from the film itself to instill further authenticity. Once that was completed, he composed a fantastic music score to bring it all to life; inspired not only by John Williams but other composers like Jerry Goldsmith, James Horner, and Danny Elfman.

After the audio was completed, Derrick assembled all the artwork he could find to match what was described, while enhancing it for high definition. Despite obtaining rare materials for years, including an entire binder of storyboards from ‘Dinosaur Supervisor’ Phil Tippett‘s collection, there was still much more that he needed. One of the people he had been in contact with over the years that had a great source for artwork and storyboards from the film was fellow collector and fan Astríd Vega of The Jurassic Park Collection and its YouTube channel. Derrick had shared and discussed the Rick Carter script with her long ago, and had even offered her various voice roles in an earlier-proposed version of the audio drama. Tragically, Astríd passed away in May of 2019… almost a year since Derrick had finally met her in-person at Universal Studios Hollywood’s Jurassic Park 25th Anniversary Event in May of 2018. Without her collection that she had shared, large portions of the video for this audio drama would not have been possible. The production is dedicated in her memory.

From Jurassic Park’s 25th Anniversary Event at Universal Studios Hollywood, 2018. From left to right: Roberto Díaz, Matthew Danczak, Derrick Davis, Astríd Vega, & Brian Belukha.

Despite amassing quite a collection of original and official materials, there was still a need for additional artwork. This task was completed by fellow fan and artist Felipe Humboldt. Felipe created several character sketches and scenic paintings based on descriptions in the script, which sometimes differed greatly from how they ended up in the final film. It should also be noted that character appearances changed even during the process of the original production itself, creating unavoidable inconsistencies throughout. Felipe also illustrated some additional moments from the script where no official artwork existed or could be found.

Felipe Humboldt’s depiction of Dr. Alan Grant wearing a makeshift papoose with a baby raptor; Lex and Tim at his side.

The end result is a one-of-a-kind experience that was an ultimate labor of love from everyone involved. While the debate can rage forever if this early version of the film would have been better than what we got, it is still fascinating to see it performed in such a dramatic way. It is also great to finally have an engaging way of presenting the art from those who worked on the film, such as Art Director John Bell, instead of having it locked away or forgotten forever.

Derrick Davis thanks everyone in the production for bringing his dream to life and realizing the imaginations of those who worked so hard to create our cherished, classic film: ‘JURASSIC PARK’.

An early “raptor pen” concept by John Bell, which was also seen briefly in the background of Jurassic Park in the film; during the lunch scene, projected on a wall.

Learn more about Bernard’s process of crafting the sound design and music score for the illustrated audio drama by checking out each of his four in-depth articles from his site. Be sure to also hear Bernard’s album release of his music score for the project!

Be sure to watch the entire series for the ultimate experience of this early version of ‘JURASSIC PARK’! Also check out everything else available at JURASSIC TIME, including the John Hammond Memoir!

Poster Created by Casey Wayne Cook Jr.

Would this earlier version of the film have been better, or are you glad we ended up with the film we got? Share your thoughts in the comments below!

This article includes quotes and information from ‘The Making Of Jurassic Park’ book, ‘Starlog’ and ‘Cinefantastique’ magazines, and additional public and private collections.

Jurassic Park’s Art Director John Bell Posts Unseen Art From The Original Films & Jurassic World!

Jurassic Park had an army of artists that helped shape the visual look of the film. Pre-production began in the summer of 1990, a full three years before its 1993 release date. During that time, the scripts changed pens between different writers, but the art department kept churning out images that didn’t necessarily match anything from them. Ideas were freely explored using Michael Crichton’s novel as the main source, while the artists injected their own personalities.

Leading the art department was Jurassic Park‘s Art Director John Bell, who we interviewed back in 2015. He also worked on the sequels: The Lost World: Jurassic Park, Jurassic Park 3, and Jurassic World. Despite his involvement in the franchise beginning almost 30 years ago, there are still many pieces of artwork he created that have yet to see the light of day. There was so much that his team created that it would likely fill an entire library!

That is why we are elated with the new posts John made on his website of previously unseen art from Jurassic Park!

Below are a small sample of what you will see:

His site also features some new amazing artwork from The Lost World: Jurassic Park! The amount of detail and ideas he had for the film’s various vehicles is astounding; including a “life pod” used as protection against big predators such as Tyrannosaurs Rex!

John has also shown, for the first time, artwork he created for Jurassic Park 3! This is especially fascinating to see since Jurassic Park 3 never had a “Making Of” book like the first two films did; leaving insights on its filmmaking process only on DVD/BLU-RAY bonus features, magazine articles, and other websites from those involved. His new page features impressive unused vehicle designs and early versions of the incubators!

And finally, we have additional artwork John created for Jurassic World, or as it was simply known to him at the time as Jurassic Park 4. We now have an incredible look at some of his more futuristic designs meshed with his older ideas for Jurassic Park in a way that would have been incredible to have seen on film!

It’s amazing that after all this time we are still getting never-before-seen material from the older films of this franchise! No matter how any of the films turned out, it goes to show just how much time and effort went into the creation of them. And who knows, maybe more will be seen someday?

In a darkened room, in an empty building with a dirty floor, it waits…

Be sure to visit John Bell’s site for additional art and browse his very own shop where you can buy some of his original work!

Jurassic World: Dominion’s Pandemic Production Inspires A Netflix Comedy In Judd Apatow’s “The Bubble”

Thanks to Collider & The Hollywood Reporter, we have discovered a very strange result of Jurassic World: Dominion‘s production during the pandemic: apparently it’s rife for comedy.

If you weren’t aware, the film’s production was halted at the start of the pandemic last year. When filming resumed, it was under a much stricter regiment than any of the film’s cast and crew had likely ever been part of. They were all forced to quarantine with each other at the UK production location and… well everyone’s seen The Shining, right? Perhaps no one chased anybody with an axe (that we’re aware of), but you can imagine the dread of isolation mixed with plenty of COVID tests. Not sure which would be scarier.

Apparently, an unnamed member of Jurassic World: Dominion‘s production told all the delicious details of the quarantine to actress Leslie Mann (Cable Guy, This Is 40). She just happens to be the wife of comedy writer/producer/director icon Judd Apatow (Knocked Up, Freaks & Geeks, Undeclared), who of course also heard what she had been told. Well, something went off in Judd’s mind that led him to believe the situation was funny enough to be made into a Netflix comedy.

(Photo by Michael Tullberg/Getty Images)

The film is titled: The Bubble. No doubt it is in reference to the bubble everyone was forced to be in during the production. Directing from a script Judd co-wrote with Pam Brady (Hamlet 2), the film has an impressive all-star cast, featuring:

Pedro Pascal (The Mandalorian, Wonder Woman 1984), Karen Gillan (Guardians Of The Galaxy, Jumanji: Welcome To The Jungle), Maria Bakalova (Borat 2), Fred Armisen (SNL, Anchorman), David Duchovny (X-Files, Twin Peaks), Peter Serafinowicz (Guardians Of The Galaxy, Shaun Of The Dead), and Keegan-Michael Key (Toy Story 4, Parks & Recreation). Leslie Mann will also star, along with her daughter Iris Apatow (This Is 40, Love, Funny People).

According to The Hollywood Reporter, the film will be about a fictional film production where:

“Gillan and Pascal will play the made-up franchise’s stars while Mann and Duchovny will play a once-married acting duo now forced to quarantine under one roof. Netflix insiders, however, say the movie has no connection to Dominion.”

While neither the story nor the cast are directly related to any of the Jurassic films, it is interesting to note that David Duchovny was once married to Jurassic Park 3 actress Téa Leoni (Amanda Kirby) from 1997-2014. The fact that he is playing part of a “once-married acting duo now forced to quarantine under one roof” is already amusing just by knowing this fact alone. While no one from Jurassic World: Dominion was ever married to one another (as far as I can investigate), Laura Dern (Ellie Sattler) and Jeff Goldblum (Ian Malcolm) were once engaged between 1995-1997. Could Mann and Duchovny’s characters be inspired by some uncomfortable scenarios between Dern and Goldblum? The fire is stoked!

While there is no release date yet set for Judd Apatow’s new comedy, The Bubble, rest assured we will be curious to see just how much is real and just how much is simply good, tasty fiction.

(Some information obtained from IMDB)

Sam Neill On Jurassic World: Dominion Feeling Like A “Six-Hour Movie” Plus More About Grant & Sattler

In Variety’s new article, Sam Neill (Alan Grant) reveals a juicy comment about the length and scope of the upcoming Jurassic World: Dominion film:

It’s going be a big film. [Director] Colin Trevorrow has that childlike sense of wonder, playfulness and inventiveness that [Steven] Spielberg has. We really shot a six-hour movie. We were all very gung-ho.”

Before you start spreading the news that Jurassic World: Dominion will be a six-hour movie, let’s remember that this film has had a lengthy and unusual production, which Neill touches on later in the article:

No one knew whether ‘Jurassic’ would continue, be postponed or be abandoned altogether […] [When we resumed] it was somewhere between rehab, summer camp and Easter break. We were compulsorily in each other’s company and much richer for it. If we were shooting in L.A., we’d go off to our different caves every night, but we got to know each other so much better.”

Given the delays and incredible circumstances, it is quite easy for everyone on the production to feel like they had made such a long film. As any Jurassic fan will also tell you, things always end up on the cutting room floor as a film is shaped into its final form. However, given the scope of this “big” film and his statement, this could mean Jurassic World: Dominion will likely be the longest film of the series. And on the chance Neill is being entirely literal, then will we see the film split in two, ala Avengers: Infinity War/Endgame? It’s entirely possible.

The article also lightly touches upon Neill’s character of Alan Grant and the relationship (or lack of) between him and Ellie Sattler (performed by Laura Dern):

“[Alan Grant is the] same character, but different world, different times. Dr. Grant and Dr. Sattler haven’t seen each other for some time, so you’ll see how that pans out.”

This likely nixes the fan theories of Grant and Sattler somehow ending up together before the start of the film. At the beginning of Jurassic Park 3, it was clear that Grant and Sattler did not stay together or raise their own family as it was set up to happen in the first Jurassic Park. This creative choice on the franchise’s story upset many fans, but director/co-writer Colin Trevorrow appears to not be retconning it for Jurassic World: Dominion based on Neill’s comment. Still, there is a chance that the story of the new film could play out in favor of what fans wanted all along, or perhaps it really will stick to what some consider as a realistic endgame of their relationship.

More information leads to more questions than answers about the story and length of Jurassic World: Dominion. Given that we have over a year to wait for this epic installment of the series, expect more tantalizing details to come!

Check out the rest of Variety’s article for more details about filming during the pandemic and Sam Neill’s new film, Rams!