Interview with Funko Games and Prospero Hall – Inspirations Behind NEW Jurassic World: The Legacy of Isla Nublar Game!

Earlier this month we were fortunate to be able to participate in a playthrough event at Funko Hollywood HQ with Funko Games and Prospero Hall for their new game: Jurassic World: The Legacy of Isla Nublar!

During this event we had the immense privilege of interviewing two of the top minds behind the development of this brand new tabletop legacy game: Deirdre Cross, Vice President of Funko Games, and Ruby Wishnietsky, Editorial Lead for Prospero Hall. These two are big fans of the Jurassic franchise and have done an incredible job with this game. Read on to hear how they injected their passion for Jurassic and tabletop gaming into Jurassic World: The Legacy of Isla Nublar!


From left to right: Jennifer Durst (Jurassic Jen), Brad Jost (The Jurassic Park Podcast), Deirdre Cross (Funko Games), Ruby Wishnietsky (Prospero Hall), Nima Neemz Nakhshab (JurassicYourWorld), and Caleb Burnett (Jurassic Outpost).


What is your relationship with Jurassic Park and Jurassic World, and how did that influence developing this game?

Ruby Wishnietsky:

“My relationship with Jurassic Park and Jurassic World was definitely deepened through the development of this game. I am a huge amusement park fan. So honestly, my clearest relationship to them is riding the ride in Florida – going through that wonderful boat ride and getting freaked out by dinosaurs.”

Deirdre Cross:

“My relationship with the Jurassic World franchise is, I would say, very deep and quite intimate. I reread the book every year and I don’t even know how many times I’ve seen the first film. But really, I celebrate the whole thing. I’m so into Jurassic World that I have two cats at my house – one of them is named Dr. Grant and the other one is named Dr. Malcolm. And they’ve both grown too big to fit in our game box.”


That is so awesome. So the word “legacy” – it feels like that’s important. How does the word legacy connect with the franchise, this game, and everything that’s going on with the new films?

Ruby:

“Well, the, the word ‘legacy’ in the title of the game, Jurassic World: The Legacy of Isla Nublar, has a few different meanings. One of the meanings of course is that the whole story is John Hammond’s legacy, right? As it goes, you know, from the inception of the park, his dream of the park, and then carries on through the whole Jurassic story. The whole thing is his legacy.

The other meaning that it has is that legacy is a type of gameplay, which means that the game changes over time. As you make decisions, it changes permanently as you and your playgroup explore the stories and the adventure and build your own park. That’s really the meaning of legacy for us in this context.”

Deirdre:

“And as you may have noticed playing the game, and as you will continue to notice, it has even deeper meanings as you play through our particular game. Not just Hammond but other characters will leave their legacy on the island and on your part. And so you’ll see how that plays out as you continue your adventures.”


What themes from the Jurassic franchise, whether it’s the books or the films, were important to you to put into this game?

Ruby:

“I have a couple that relate to some specific aspects of the game that I love to talk about. One of the big themes that played a big role in our art direction is the early fear of how technology is going to affect the natural world. In the art direction of the game, we went very much from the perspective of what influenced the creators of the Jurassic stories: 1950s and ’60s pulp comics, monster movie posters, and even scientific textbooks. Thinking about how this exciting new technology field of genetics is going to change things for the better or for the worse – who knows?

One of the other themes that I think we play on a lot in the gameplay sense is the wonder at the unknown and learning with our new scientific knowledge – learning some aspects of what used to be and what was extinct, but not having the whole story.”

Deirdre:

“I mean, we’re filling in the gaps. You know, there’s still gaps in the code, the DNA. And we’re sort of guessing at what it was. And in the mechanical gameplay of our game, there are gaps there and the players can guess – maybe they’ll guess right and be a little more prepared, or maybe something’s going to go very differently than what they expected.

I also feel like a theme is ‘you can’t put it back in the box.’ Like, there are things you can’t undo.”


The artwork is gorgeous. Can you talk a little bit more about what it was like developing the artwork and all of the stickers and game pieces and everything?

Deirdre:

“Like Ruby was saying about where we went to look for our inspiration for the art style and everything – back to the fifties and sixties, pulp and scientific textbooks, scientific magazines. But beyond that we also had this great opportunity to do these sculpts in the game, the sculpted miniatures. And we worked very closely with Universal and Amblin to get their files for 3D dinosaurs and stuff. We’re getting all this amazing stuff and we start to realize, well, yeah, we can just make the dinosaurs.

A lot of games just have dinosaurs in them, but what if our game had a more immersive sculpture that tells a story on its own that is also a really beautiful storytelling piece? So when you look at our sculpted velociraptor game piece, it’s two raptors coming out of the door of the kitchen. It’s so cool.

It’s so great to get to really pour so much creativity into those tiny pieces that are on the table. And I think as you look at the whole product, from the stickers to the card art to even the liner of the box, everything is bespoke and original to the product.”


Last question: You said you read the books often. Was there anything from those that influenced this game at all?

Deirdre:

“I think, like what Ruby’s saying about the exploration of science and the tension of the unknown… If you’ve also read the books, you understand what Steven Spielberg was doing when he created the films, because that was his source material. The story he’s trying to tell, when you also read the books as more backstory, there’s a lot more in there about that tension. Though our game does not technically cover the books, you can definitely feel their DNA.”



We cannot thank Deirdre Cross, Vice President of Funko Games, and Ruby Wishnietsky, Editorial Lead for Prospero Hall, enough for taking the time to speak with us about their passions for Jurassic and this fantastic new game. It’s clear their love for all things Jurassic and board games has been woven into this product, and the beautiful result speaks for itself. Jurassic fans are going to love experiencing this game.

You can still secure your copy of the game by backing its Kickstarter campaign here! What do you think so far about this game, its visual style, and the influences of the creators? Let us know in the comments below, and stay tuned to Jurassic Outpost for all Jurassic news!

Beyond the Gates Returns With First-Ever Lex Murphy Figure and Phil Tippett Guest Appearance!

What is it? It’s a Velociraptor. It’s inside.

A new set joins Mattel’s Jurassic World Legacy Collection in this new episode of Beyond The Gates! Last month we showcased an item from The Lost World, this month we’re heading 87 miles Northeast of Isla Sorna back to Isla Nublar, with the Jurassic Park Kitchen Encounter Set.

The Jurassic Park Kitchen Encounter brings one of the most beloved scenes from Jurassic Park to life, featuring a Velociraptor, Tim, and the first-ever action figure of Lex Murphy! Lex has long been requested since the Kenner days, and Mattel has finally brought her to life in collectible form. The episode shows off the new set in action, and goes behind the scenes with toy designer Rafael Bencosme so if you haven’t already be sure to watch.

Not only that – the Dinosaur Supervisor himself Phil Tippett, guides us through his work contributing to the creation of this now infamous scene the toy set was based upon. It was an absolute honor to talk to Phil, and his work on Jurassic Park was absolutely key to making the scene – and velociraptors – so terrifying.

Finally, this episode included one more surprise — the announcement of fans-first “Generation Jurassic” event occurring at Universal Studios Hollywood April 28th! While we can’t share more details about the event quite yet, we’re quite excited about it and will have more to say soon. We really hope to see you there!

As always, stay tuned to Jurassic Outpost for more news – there’s a lot of exciting things on the horizon.

4-Part Interview With Storyboard Artist David Lowery Unveils New Art & Details From The Making Of The ‘Jurassic’ Films!

Join me on a lengthy and engaging discussion with David Lowery! He was the storyboard artist on the entire ‘Jurassic Park’ trilogy and the first ‘Jurassic World’ film. His talents were also part of the productions for ‘Honey, I Shrunk The Kids’, ‘Rango’, ‘Solo: A Star Wars Story’, ‘The Mandalorian’, and many others. Included in the interview are a myriad of David’s storyboards, with some that have never been seen before!

Click Image To Watch The Full Interview Playlist!

There are four parts to the interview, with each one focusing on a different film. The first part delves into how it all began with ‘Jurassic Park’! David explains how he got involved with the film, what it was like to shape classic sequences with Steven Spielberg, why certain scenes were cut, and a lot more! Newly-revealed storyboards show Robert Muldoon attempting to tranquilize the Tyrannosaurus Rex after it has escaped from its paddock; a scene inspired by the novel that was never filmed! There is also a drawing featured that was made by Spielberg himself!

In Part Two, David recounts his memories from working on ‘The Lost World: Jurassic Park’. Before the film even began, he first helped Spielberg create a new studio: DreamWorks! From there, his role expanded in the first ‘Jurassic’ sequel, working even closer with Spielberg and storyboarding many sequences, including: the thrilling Stegosaurus meeting, the terrifying trailer attack by the Tyrannosaurs, and the divisive San Diego chase (a bigger climax that was created due to pressure from the success of ‘Independence Day’ the year prior)! For the first time, we also get a look at the full storyboards for the Rex raid on the hunter camp and the raptor attack in the long grass! He also details how the film’s paleontologist advisor, Jack Horner, helped shape the look of a shot involving footprints that was left largely unfilmed!

The third part of the interview touches on ‘Jurassic Park 3’, and what it was like shifting to a different director: Joe Johnston. David remembers what it was like being at the extraordinary indoor jungle sets! He also details the challenges he and the production faced to please eager audiences with the anticipated film. The story went through many changes, with several never-before-seen storyboard sequences featuring a group of kids as they are faced with Isla Sorna’s fierce inhabitants! We also discuss the interesting change of the film’s lead dinosaur from Baryonyx to Spinosaurus; something that was evident in an early logo!

In the final part of the interview, we discuss the early storyboards David did for ‘Jurassic Park 4’, which would eventually become ‘Jurassic World’. Many of the sequences he storyboarded either didn’t make it into the film or were tweaked in various ways after he had left the project. He explains what the original opening of the film was before Colin Trevorrow came on board to direct, and it definitely sounded… interesting! Despite leaving the film during its production hiatus to work for Jon Favreau on Disney’s ‘The Jungle Book’ remake (leading David to eventually storyboard for the highly-praised ‘Star Wars’ Disney+ show, ‘The Mandalorian’), he was thrilled with how the film, and largely the series as whole, turned out. At the end of the interview, we are treated with a video “animatic” of David Lowery’s “Opening Montage” storyboards from the film, fan-made by Bernard A. Kyer (beginning with footage from the fantastic computer game ‘Jurassic Explorer‘)! It shows a vastly expanded version of what the opening to ‘Jurassic World’ could have been!

I’d like to thank David Lowery for taking the time to reminisce about his experiences working on the ‘Jurassic’ films, and the many fantastic storyboards he created that are truly a work of art!

I hope you enjoy this multi-part interview! After watching it, what were some of your favorite stories David told? Which storyboard sequences captured your imagination the most! Share your thoughts in the comments below, and as always stay tuned to Jurassic Outpost for the latest!

Insight Editions “Jurassic Park Visual History” Book Is Released, But Is It “Ultimate”?

For years, fans of ‘Jurassic Park’ have wanted an art book of the franchise’s original three films. While we have had wonderful “making of” books for both ‘Jurassic Park’ and ‘The Lost World: Jurassic Park’ since the films were released, there was only so many of the thousands of production artwork that could have been displayed. ‘Jurassic Park 3’ never even got any form of a “behind the scenes” book at all.

Insight Editions has a new book that claims to change all of that, with “Jurassic Park: The Ultimate Visual History“. They describe it as:

The most comprehensive book about the Jurassic Park trilogy to date, Jurassic Park: The Ultimate Visual History begins with an in-depth account of the making of Spielberg’s original film, including rare and never-before-seen imagery and exclusive interviews with key creatives. Readers will then unearth the full history of the trilogy, from The Lost World: Jurassic Park to Jurassic Park III, through unprecedented access to the creative process behind the films. Fans will also find a fascinating look at the wider world of the saga, including video games, toys, comics, and more, exploring the lasting legacy of the movies and their influence on pop culture.

But after all this time, is this new book truly the “ultimate visual history”? Unfortunately, it’s not; but it is a good attempt with some beautiful new images and information thanks to the “key creatives” from the film’s production.

WHAT’S GOOD?

VISUAL STYLE

The book is visually pleasing, featuring Jurassic-inspired borders around the pages, filling them up with as much colorful artwork and photographs as they can. The text is neatly placed within it all, and nothing ever feels too crammed or out of place.

EXCLUSIVE INTROS/OUTROS FROM THE ORIGINAL TRIO

Sam Neil, Laura Dern, and Jeff Goldblum each get their very own pages in the book to speak about the franchise from their own words. This is a nice personal touch to the book that fans will love. For example, Laura Dern recounts:

My favorite memory is going to the Amblin offices to watch Jurassic Park for the first time. We were in this small screening room, and it was just me, Steven, Jeff, and Sam. Steven’s assistant very kindly brought us popcorn, the lights went down, and we watched our movie. It’s a beautiful thing to see a movie with your filmmaker. […] You really feel the beauty of the collaboration, and there is nothing like it. And, in that moment, we realized Steven had made a world none of us had ever seen before—not even in our wildest dreams. The four of us were screaming and crying. It’s one of the great memories of my life, and to be able to share in the magic he created was really incredible.

NEW IMAGES

As hoped for, there are some never-before-seen illustrations, and some that are seen in better quality than in the past. Across the board, ‘Jurassic Park”s Art Director John Bell fills this book with amazing artwork for all 3 films (most were recently seen in advance on his website). One of the new illustrations is of Dennis Nedry in his Jeep, driving during the storm toward the East Dock, thwarted by crashed machinery that blocks his path.

Storyboard Artist David Lowery also provides several new storyboards from all 3 films, including little Benjamin’s point of view in his San Diego house when the T-Rex arrives (complete with an E.T. toy reference that didn’t make it into the film, but later would in ‘Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom’).

NEW INFORMATION

While many stories do get recounted to drive a narrative for the book, there are plenty of bits of new information thanks to new interviews.

For ‘Jurassic Park’, several details are revealed: Spielberg’s infatuation with dinosaurs as a kid thanks to museum exhibits, lowering the budget was the reason the baby Triceratops scene was ultimately cut, John Williams expresses his delight writing the music for the Raptors, and even Spielberg’s take on there suddenly being a drop in the T-rex paddock: There’s a T. rex [there]! [The audience isn’t] gonna notice anything else but that!. There is also mention of how Ian Malcolm was almost cut from the film, more than once, until Jeff Goldblum auditioned for the role:

Reading lines from the novel, Goldblum, known for playing a brilliant yet troubled scientist in The Fly (1986), immediately captured Malcolm’s essence. “I watched the tape with Steven and we just went, ‘Yes!’” says Hirshenson. Jim Carrey, a few years away from his breakthrough role in 1994’s The Mask, also tried out for the part and made a strong impression. But Hirshenson instinctively knew Goldblum was perfect for Malcolm: “He just has a persona and speech pattern like nobody else . . . such a wonderful oddball!” Goldblum’s take on Malcolm was so compelling that it convinced Spielberg to keep the character. Recalls Koepp: “Steven said, ‘I know why you want to cut him. But Jeff Goldblum came in and was just reading from the book, and he was so good.’” With the actor’s distinct vocal patterns in mind, the character finally clicked for Koepp, and he wrote Malcolm back into the script: “Once I started picturing Jeff, it was easy. He’s such a distinctive actor. He was perfect for the part.”

For ‘The Lost World’, Spielberg reveals how he originally was going to do a third film where dinosaurs got off the island until he realized he likely wouldn’t do another one, which was a big reason why the climax of ‘The Lost World’ changed to San Diego’s T-Rex rampage. There is also a brief mention of why Kelly became Malcolm’s daughter instead of a student, like she was in the novel: to mirror the protection of the T-Rex’s offspring with that of Malcolm’s. But perhaps the most interesting new detail is that screenwriter David Koepp directed some second unit footage for the film, which shaped how one sequence played out due to a circumstance:

After Spielberg and the main crew returned to LA, David Koepp stayed in Kaua‘i to direct the second unit, principally shooting an early sequence where a chartered boat ferries Malcolm, Van Owen, and Carr to the island. “It was supposed to be a sequence of them landing the boat,” says Koepp. “People and equipment pour off the boat, and they have this conversation on the beach.” But on the day of the shoot, the tide changed and the boat they were filming on got stuck on a sandbar. Panicked, Koepp called Spielberg. “I remember Steven was on a plane, and I was talking to him, saying, ‘We’re stuck on a sandbar. I can’t do the landing.’ And he said, ‘Oh . . . what are you gonna do?’” On the spot, Koepp reshaped the scene so that the captain of the ship refuses to go further upriver, spooked by stories of fishermen disappearing near the island: “I kind of rewrote it on the boat as we were all sitting there.”

JURASSIC PARK 3′

As mentioned, ‘Jurassic Park 3’ never had a behind-the-scenes book before; so that automatically gives this book a major bonus point. While some stories and quotes are lifted directly from other sources over the years (more on that later), to finally have a compilation of the film’s history is praise alone. Unlike the old DVD bonus features, the book takes a more honest look at the film’s troubled history involving its script. In fact, David Lowery recounts how there was even a contest involved with coming up with the film’s opening sequence:

They had a contest: Who could come up with the best opening? We all pitched some version. Nobody won the contest, which was kind of a bummer.”

The compilation of information is joined by a myriad of artwork, both new and old, which is all incredible to see finally cobbled together.

FOCUS ON SCRIPTS

While touched upon in the prior books made for ‘Jurassic Park’ and ‘The Lost World’, this time there is a greater focus on the scriptwriting process of the film. David Koepp usually chimes in with commentary on his drafts, making the process that much more interesting to delve into. Several different drafts, in different stages, get summarized in this book for all three films, although there is one omission that is a bit puzzling (more on that later, as well).

THE INSERTS

One of the biggest standouts for the book are its various inserts, which is a staple of Insight Editions books. There are some replica prop designs throughout that are fun (but with some issues, that you will see below), beautiful character design illustrations for ‘The Lost World’, various selections of never-before-seen storyboards, a blueprint, and a lot more.

WHAT’S NOT SO GOOD?

THE INSERTS

The inserts are often held with an adhesive that will unfortunately leave a permanent stain on some items, whether they are removed or not.

INACCURACIES

Unfortunately, this book has inaccuracies. Some leeway must be given with the nearly 3 decades since the original film came out, for example, but there are some errors that easily would have been spotted by a fan if seen in advance. For example, it is mentioned that “Hasbro brought its relationship with Jurassic Park to an end in 2005“, which is not accurate at all. ‘Jurassic Park’ toys from the company continued in 2006, 2009, and 2013. Let alone 2015, when it took on the toys for ‘Jurassic World’ (though to be fair, one could say that is no longer ‘Jurassic Park’). Another flub is that the Stegosaurus animatronic in ‘The Lost World’ is completely out of the film when it can be seen, for multiple shots, in a cage during Sarah and Nick’s sneaking into the Hunter Camp. While it is easy for a writer unfamiliar to the franchise to make these kinds of mistakes, even with research, perhaps it should have been looked at further by people who could have averted this kind of misinformation.

OMISSIONS

While editing a book always involves “cutting the fat” out of its diet, I feel like some things should have been adapted that weren’t. For example, the biggest portion of new artwork comes mostly from John Bell and David Lowery: something NO ONE is complaining about seeing! But a countless number of artists worked on all three films, and it would have been nice to see more variety from some of the lesser-presented talent. There are also some surprising artwork omissions compared to the original books, such as no art at all for the omitted river sequence of ‘Jurassic Park’. Having key sequences like that from the film’s history not even present this time, when it was before, takes the word “ultimate” out of the equation. So don’t you dare throw away your old copies of the “Making Of” books!

This may feel personal, but I am also surprised that the widely documented (and even performed) script arranged by Rick Carter, ‘Jurassic Park”s Production Designer, which featured many storyboards as seen here, was not even brought up. While it may have been obscure or not even referenced in their files, it would have easily shown up online at the time the book was being worked on. Which brings us to…

YOU HAVE THE INTERNET… USE IT

While there is definitely new information in this book, due to whatever access they did have with people and places, it still doesn’t feel like they took full advantage of all opportunities at their disposal. Fan sites that have been around for years could have been courted with the wealth of additional materials they have procured if it wasn’t immediately available to them (many with images in high definition). It has also been known that special collections house materials from the films that could have been accessed for this book. An internet search would have likely picked up on these details easily.

Jurassic Outpost is quoted in this book numerous times for our Shelly Johnson interview, for example. It is clear they were aware of at least some parts of our site… yet we were never contacted. Had we been, and if they had seen our additional articles and interviews, they could have been greatly assisted. While we appreciate being referenced in the book, we were not fully utilized… and to their disadvantage.

THE COVER

The cover features a beautiful illustration by David J. Negrón that was made for the film during pre-production, featuring Grant and the kids being chased by the Tyrannosaurus Rex. It’s a striking image, and easy to see why it was used for the cover. Unfortunately, there is something very WRONG with it. The faces and even the bodies of the three humans have been photoshopped to resemble their film counterparts.

The REAL illustration features how the characters were conceived based on scripts at the time, and gave Grant the likeness of Harrison Ford due to a request that Spielberg made… which is even mentioned in this book:

Spielberg had considered [Harrison] Ford, his Indiana Jones, for the role of Grant. “I had a concept painting made featuring Grant with Timmy and Lex running toward camera, the T. rex in hot pursuit,” he says. Mulling over the possibility of casting his longtime leading man, he asked the artist to paint in Ford’s face and sent it to the actor with a copy of the script. “I know he read the script and he saw the picture,” recalls Spielberg. “And he just said . . . at this point in his life and career, this wasn’t his cup of tea.”

Now, from a marketing perspective it makes sense to perhaps touch up the image to make the characters resemble as they do in the film to better sell their product. However, the big problem here is that the same illustration is featured later in the book… in the same photoshopped form. Worst of all, it credits David J. Negrón only, and has no mention of the alterations or who did them. While it is POSSIBLE David had been contacted to do it himself, this seems rather unlikely. What we have here then is a case of art being misrepresented, and it’s a big issue. It’s like painting a smile on the Mona Lisa.

Also, why not just use another image for the cover that didn’t require any photoshop at all?

IT’S JUST NOT “ULTIMATE”

When it comes down to it, it’s hard to call this book “The Ultimate Visual History” when it isn’t. Is it a beautiful book, loaded with wonderful imagery and with plenty of details and goodies? Yes, it certainly is. Will many fans love it? Definitely. But the criticisms must be pointed out, because if they are not, these kinds of things will just keep happening. Inaccuracies can become facts, omissions can become lost to time, and not taking advantage of materials easily at your disposal is a detriment to the fans for a product like this. This book is good, but it isn’t great; which is truly unfortunate. It comes with a mild recommendation, if you can afford it at its current price point.

If anyone involved with this book sees this article, please don’t take it personally. We are passionate fans who are just passionate about these kinds of products. The Insight Editions Back To The Future book had a revised version; perhaps the same can be done for ‘Jurassic Park’? I hope it happens so these issues can be resolved, at least to some degree.

While we did NOT quite endorse this book, what do you think? If you agree, comment below. If not, don’t bother. Only joking!

Interview with BEASTS OF THE MESOZOIC Creator David Silva!

Fresh off completion of the Kickstarter Campaign for the Beasts of the Mesozoic: Tyrannosaur Series, creator David Silva joined Jurassic Outpost to talk about his work with Neca, McFarlane, the 2009 Jurassic Park Hasbro toy line, and his own collectible line: Beasts of the Mesozoic!

In the interview, David talks about his passion for creating and collecting action figures, his interests in natural history and scientific accuracy, and what it took to bring this project to life. Watch the interview below!

From the Beasts of the Mesozoic Kickstarter:


“Beasts of the Mesozoic is a line of scientifically accurate, dinosaur action figure collectibles with elaborate detail and articulation.”

Created by David Silva

After completing a Beasts of the Mesozoic: Raptor Series in 2016, a Beasts of the Mesozoic: Ceratopsian Series in 2019, and finding success in creating nearly 40 different figures, David and Creative Beast Studio began work on the Tyrannosaur Series. The campaign exceeded its goal and is aiming to begin distribution next year. Previous series and other merchandise can be viewed and purchased in the Creative Beast Shop.

You can view some of the Tyrannosaur Series’ incredible package art below, created by artists Raph Lomotan, Gabriel Ugueto, Raul Ramos, Shannon Beaumont, and RJ Palmer.


Be sure and check out our interview with David Silva on our YouTube channel, and stay tuned to see more from the Beasts of the Mesozoic action figure line. Let us know your thoughts on these figures below!

Images courtesy of Creative Beast Studio and Beasts of the Mesozoic.

Ariana Richards Teases a Possible Return to the World of Jurassic!

Jurassic Park‘s Lex Murphy, Ariana Richards, was recently interviewed by the Celebrity Catch Up podcast and offered some interesting thoughts on her career and Jurassic. Though Richards stepped away from the acting world many years ago to focus on her very successful art career, she didn’t rule out a return.

During the interview, host Genevieve took listeners through a retrospective of Richards’ film career. Richards portrayed Lex Murphy in Jurassic Park in 1993 and briefly in The Lost World: Jurassic Park in 1997. Things got interesting when they reached that portion of the retrospective. When asked if she would ever return to the Jurassic franchise or in Jurassic World: Dominion for adult scenes of Lex Murphy, Richards responded:

Now that is something I wouldn’t be able to comment on.”

That is certainly a very intriguing answer. She was subsequently asked if she’d ever consider a return to acting, and said she would “if the right project comes along.”

With Laura Dern, Sam Neill, and Jeff Goldblum confirmed to return for major roles in Jurassic World: Dominion next summer, could an even further Jurassic reunion be in store? And in light of producer Frank Marshall’s hints that Dominion won’t be the end but the “start of a new era,” could there be a return in mind for Lex in future Jurassic projects? We’ll have to wait and see.

Excitement is high for the return of Jurassic Park‘s ‘big three’, and the possibility of Richards’ return only heightens that anticipation. We’d love to see her return, and perhaps with her brother Tim! No matter what’s in store, we celebrate the amazing Ariana Richards and wish her continued success.

You can listen to the entire Ariana Richards episode of the Celebrity Catch Up podcast here. The interview is a great listen. If nothing else, it unearths a few great stories that fans will love about Jeff Goldblum, Steven Spielberg, and the T. rex animatronic from the production of Jurassic Park.

What do you think about this interview, and how do you feel about Lex returning for Jurassic World: Dominion or other future Jurassic projects? Let us know in the comments below!

Images courtesy of the Celebrity Catch Up podcast and The Jurassic Vault.

BD Wong Shares His Appreciation for JURASSIC PARK and Excitement for JURASSIC WORLD: DOMINION!

BD Wong sporting a Jurassic World: Dominion jacket while making his directorial debut on the set of “Nora From Queens.”

Jurassic Park and Jurassic World icon BD Wong (Dr. Henry Wu himself) recently joined the Lights, Camera, Barstool podcast for an interview about his life, directing and acting, and of course, Jurassic.

The interview discussed what it’s like to be an actor and director in today’s world, the classic nature of Jurassic Park, and most excitingly BD’s thoughts and excitement for next summer’s Jurassic World: Dominion.


Before we move on: This interview contains mild spoilers for Jurassic World: Dominion. If you don’t wish to see them, we advise not reading further.


When asked if he had a different appreciation for Jurassic Park as a cornerstone of cinema after all this time, he responded:

“I would say I do have a growing appreciation, and there’s a kind of depth to that appreciation. I started out doing the first movie and I didn’t take it seriously at all. First of all, it didn’t feel like I was taken seriously as a character in that first movie; they didn’t explain what happened to that person. And the fact that they didn’t explain what happened to that person opened the door for him to return… So their negligence actually became something that was an opportunity for me. And now I’ve done three more of these Jurassic World films, the third one just having been completed.”

Continuing on about his character in Jurassic World: Dominion:

“In the arc (of the Jurassic World films), the filmmakers have a real allegiance to the character, a real affection for him, and want that arc to be satisfying to the fans. And so I feel that effort being made on his behalf, and I appreciate that because I didn’t want to just do the same thing every single time. I feel like it evolves, and it evolves to a very satisfying place to me. He had this incredibly epic death in the book that just never really got delivered in the first movie. And so now we have this, no spoilers, but, this resolution and an ending that is really satisfying to me.”

When asked about the scale of Jurassic World: Dominion and if he could tease it at all, he said:

“I’m not allowed to give spoilers, but I will say – it is bigger. Like, they really wanted to go out with a bang, and they made the last one really big. I think it’s bigger and longer and more like a ‘film’ than just ‘another installment of‘… All the principles from Jurassic Park are in it. Laura Dern, Sam Neill, and Jeff Goldblum are in it, and they’re not just like ‘Oh, look, there they are.’ They’re playing leading parts in the movie. So there’s Bryce and Chris Pratt who are the Jurassic World couple, and then there are these three honorary, huge, iconic characters that are coming back, resolving their relationships and their relationships to the whole conundrum of dinosaurs existing… and so it’s kinda big! There’s a weight to it that I like thinking about.”

You can watch a clip of that moment in the interview below:

Wong also spoke to the unique nature of production during the pandemic, saying:

“It was the first movie that came back into production after the movies all shut down last year, and that was meaningful because it set up a lot of protocols that are still being used today and that were so important to getting the industry back on its feet… The side effect of that for us was that we were all quarantined in the same hotel, and there was this kind of ‘team spirit’ feeling that came as a result of that… We were all there, working on the same scene the night of the election… and so that was memorable.”

And continuing about the scale of the film:

“But it is big… Every single person who has gone in to the studio to re-record their lines – it’s called looping – gets to see, like three minutes of the film. Every single person has come back to the group text that we have saying, “Guys, this is incredible. Like, incredibly beautifully shot and, you know, really epic. And I can’t believe that it’s even more than the other two were before it.”


You can listen to the entire interview on Apple Podcasts here, and on Spotify here. BD Wong’s portion of the episode begins at around 1:02:00.

All in all, Wong seemed extremely grateful to be able to revisit a character decades later and to be a part of the Jurassic franchise as a whole. It is thrilling to hear his excitement and affection for Jurassic World: Dominion and the Jurassic franchise.

What do you think about what BD Wong shared in this interview and what it means for the next Jurassic World film? Let us know in the comments below!

Julianne Moore has never been asked to reprise role of Dr. Sarah Harding in Jurassic sequels

In an interview with Collider, talking about her upcoming film The Glorias, actress Julianne Moore let it be known that she would be on board to return to the Jurassic franchise, but up to this moment she has not been asked.

After starring as Dr. Sarah Harding in 1997’s second installment, The Lost World: Jurassic Park, there has been no in film mention of what happened to or became of her character.

“Yeah, Sarah Harding. Maybe she’s not done yet. I don’t know. But no one has approached me. That’s ok! But if they did? Yeah, sure! Of course, of course!

In The Lost World: Jurassic Park, it is mentioned that Sarah Harding flew to Costa Rica shortly after the 1993 accident on Isla Nublar to visit Dr. Ian Malcolm in the hospital to find out if the rumors were true about an island full of dinosaurs. The two would form a personal relationship and after being recruited by John Hammond in 1997 to visit Isla Sorna, Site B, with a team to document the dinosaurs, Malcolm reluctantly agrees to go also to the island in an attempt to rescue her.

While documenting alone on Sorna prior to the rest of the team joining her, she discovers why the dinosaurs have have survived without without being given supplemental enzymes since they were bred lysine-deficient. Sarah also plays a key role in capturing the male T-Rex that escapes from the S.S. Venture and runs wild in the streets of San Diego.

So what happened to Sarah in the last 23 years? Is she still an Animal Behaviorist and Paleontologist? Is she still interested in seeing living dinosaurs up close? Do her and Malcolm still have a relationship? Apparently these answers will not come in Jurassic World: Dominion, at least not in the format of her being on screen. It would seem that her expertise could come in handy in a modern world where dinosaurs are roaming free globally.

Are you disappointed that Julianne Moore as never been asked back for a Jurassic sequel? Would you like to see her return at some point in the future, possibly in a Jurassic Park 7? Please let us know your thoughts in the comments section down below!

New Interview With ‘Jurassic Park’ Sound Designer Gary Rydstrom, and ‘Jurassic Park 3’ Cinematographer Shelly Johnson

Earlier this year we had the opportunity to interview cinematographer Shelly Johnson, who brought Isla Sorna to life in 2001’s Jurassic Park 3. The two hour interview explores Shelly’s work on the third movie along with diving into concepts and ideas that never made it to screen – along with some Jurassic Park 4 concepts too!

A new interview with Shelly which further expands upon our discussion has now released over at Soundstage Access. Check it out below:

The interview dives deeper into Jurassic Park 3’s recycling of old sets from The Lost World and what it was like taking over the Universal backlot shooting throughout the fall of 2000.

Brando at Soundstage Access also interviewed Gary Rydstrom who was the sound designer for Jurassic Park and who has signed on as the sound designer for the upcoming Jurassic World: Dominion.

In the interview Gary discusses his creative process designing the dino-sounds for the first Jurassic Park.

Thanks to Brando for sharing these with us, what a great couple of interviews! The interviews are both available on iTunes along with Spotify, so be sure to check out the Shelly interview and Gary interview there. Let us know what you think in the comments down below!

Jurassic Time Interviews Creature Artist Rick Galinson About The Dilophosaurus’ Hidden Venom Sacs

The Dilophosaurus is arguably one of the most interesting dinosaurs seen in Jurassic Park, and while it doesn’t hold up as well scientifically as some of the other dinosaurs, the colourful frill and poisonous venom make it one of the more terrifying and unique encounters in the movie.

While the dinosaur has only appeared once in the franchise, a revival of this species is something many are hoping for in Jurassic World: Dominion. Until we see it on screen once again, we can only look back at original concept art and it’s original appearance and that is exactly what Jurassic Time have done.

And they’ve discovered something new. Hidden beneath the mouth of the juvenile Dilophosaurus that Dennis Nedry encounters is a venom sac, that was intended to inflate before the dinosaur spits the venom.

The original creator and puppeteer recently spoke with Bernard from Jurassic Time, revealing more about this mechanism that unfortunately failed on set. They had intended to film a close-up of the Dilophosaurus that showed the expansion of the frill and the mouth opening, the venom sacs filling up, and then the venom actually leaving the mouth. Instead, the shot cut away to a close-up Nedry’s face as the venom hit.

“When the Dilo spit, it worked but we tested in hot, dry air in our Van Nuys studio. Compressed air cools down rapidly as it expands during the ‘spit’. This cooling created a visible cloud of gas and gave away the gag in the cold/humid stage at Universal. They cut the film around it. But the mouth would open wide, the venom sac would sell up in its throat and the tongue would lift up like a serpent revealing the spit openings.

He also detailed the mechanism behind the dinosaur’s tongue which originally would be seen moving.

“The tongue was a two stage tentacle mechanism and the base was on an ‘up/down’ pulley, too.  The tentacles would allow the two sections of the tongue to move up and down and left and right independently of each other making it very serpent-like.  Then, the base would rotate the tongue up to the top of the mouth to reveal the venom pits beneath.”

The full interview with Rick dives into the Dilophosaurs’ design and concepts through the production of Jurassic Park, which you can read here. Bernard has also put together a video that tells this story and showcases some of the concept art showing the venom sacks:

It’s a really interesting feature that never fully made it to the screen. The venom sacs can be hard to spot but are seen briefly on the Dilophosaurus when inside the car. The sacs can be seen on most of the concept art and storyboards too!

What do you make of this discovery, and had you noticed the venom sacs yourself? Are you hoping the Dilophosaurus returns in Jurassic World: Dominion? Let us know in the comments section down below, and a huge thanks to Jurassic Time for sharing this discovery with us!